Program

Below is the program from the 2019 MIT Sustainability Summit.

Friday 26 April 2019
8:00 AM
Register/Breakfast
9:00 AM
Introductory Remarks

Location: 7th Floor MIT

David Keith
Mitsui Career Development Professor and Assistant Professor of System Dynamics, MIT Sloan School of Management
Drawing on his experience working in the automotive industry, David studies consumer behavior, firm strategy and the formation of markets for emerging automotive technologies. His research examines issues including spatial patterns of technology adoption, supply constraints in production, platform competition, and the impact of new technologies on energy consumption and the environment.

David has received several awards for his research, including a Fulbright scholarship, an Alcoa Foundation Fellowship from the American-Australian Association, and a Martin Family Sustainability Fellowship from the MIT Energy Initiative. David previously worked for Holden, the Australian subsidiary of General Motors, and URS Corporation, a global engineering and environmental consultancy.

David holds BEng (Hons.), BCom, and MEnv degrees from the University of Melbourne (Australia) and a PhD from the MIT Engineering Systems Division.
9:20 AM
Opening Keynote: What IS Sustainable Mobility?

Location: 7th Floor MIT

Sustainability and mobility: two buzzwords thrown around at will in today’s most pressing conversations, but what do they really mean? How do they relate to each other? And what can we do to more effectively intertwine them? Kent Larson, Director of City Science at the MIT Media Lab, will explore the core issues at stake in today’s landscape of sustainable mobility, introducing concrete measures of sustainability to be addressed in each of the day’s panel conversations and challenging panelists and attendees to work through today’s most difficult yet pressing sustainable mobility challenges.
Kent Larson
Director of City Science, MIT Media Lab
Kent Larson directs the City Science (formerly Changing Places) group at the MIT Media Lab. His research focuses on developing urban interventions that enable more entrepreneurial, livable, high-performance districts in cities. To that end, his projects include advanced simulation and augmented reality for urban design, transformable micro-housing for millennials, mobility-on-demand systems that create alternatives to private automobiles, and Urban Living Lab deployments in Hamburg, Andorra, Taipei, and Boston.

Larson and researchers from his group received the “10-Year Impact Award” from UbiComp 2014. This is a “test of time” award for work that, with the benefit of hindsight, has had the greatest impact over the previous decade.
Larson practiced architecture for 15 years in New York City, with design work published in Architectural Record, Progressive Architecture, Global Architecture, The New York Times, A+U, and Architectural Digest. The New York Times Review of Books selected his book, Louis I. Kahn: Unbuilt Masterworks (2000) as one of that year’s ten best books in architecture.
10:00 AM
The Preeminence of the Car and US Exceptionalism

Location: 6th Floor D3& D4

The car has been king for the past 70 years. It is entrenched in American infrastructure, financial systems, and even cultural heritage. Cars have been one of the hallmarks of the American dream and freedom. In facing a new world of (seemingly) sustainable transportation innovations, how do we extract ourselves from the shadow of yesterday’s automobility and reimagine the next generation of transportation? Is it even feasible to envision a future without cars/personal motorized transportation? Or have we dug a hole too deep to get out of?
MODERATOR David Keith
Mitsui Career Development Professor and Assistant Professor of System Dynamics, MIT Sloan School of Management
Drawing on his experience working in the automotive industry, David studies consumer behavior, firm strategy and the formation of markets for emerging automotive technologies. His research examines issues including spatial patterns of technology adoption, supply constraints in production, platform competition, and the impact of new technologies on energy consumption and the environment.

David has received several awards for his research, including a Fulbright scholarship, an Alcoa Foundation Fellowship from the American-Australian Association, and a Martin Family Sustainability Fellowship from the MIT Energy Initiative. David previously worked for Holden, the Australian subsidiary of General Motors, and URS Corporation, a global engineering and environmental consultancy.

David holds BEng (Hons.), BCom, and MEnv degrees from the University of Melbourne (Australia) and a PhD from the MIT Engineering Systems Division.
Jon Coleman
Director of City Solutions, Ford Smart Mobility, LLC
Dr. Jon Coleman is Director, City Solutions, Ford Smart Mobility, LLC. He leads Ford’s mobility policy and strategy efforts to engage municipalities in the implementation of solutions that address growing urban mobility needs. He plays a key role in connecting Ford’s internal capabilities and thought leadership with external partners to increase accessibility to everyone moving in and around cities and to the goods they need.
Jon has been involved with sustainability at Ford for almost 20 years working to embed advanced technologies into products and services. He has represented Ford at venues such as the United Nations, TED, the Clinton Global Initiative and the Academy of Management. His passion for sustainability is evident in his research focusing on how large organizations engage in sustainable behavior and how that decision making process can be embedded in an organization's day–to-day operations. Jon’s view of sustainability goes far beyond "green" to include human rights, urban mobility and societal well-being, embracing the ideal that true sustainability involves "doing more good, not doing less bad."
He earned his Bachelor’s degree in Marketing from Ohio State, his Master’s degree in Finance from Xavier and his Doctorate in Management from Case Western Reserve University.
Angela Johnson-Rodriguez
Transportation Justice Organizer, Transportation for Massachusetts
Angela Johnson-Rodriguez is the Transportation Justice Organizer at Transportation for Massachusetts. She works with the coalition’s members and community-based organizations to promote equitable access to transportation all across the Commonwealth, and to help ensure fairness and opportunity as technology transforms mobility. Angela is also the Vice President of the Board of Directors at the Boston Cyclists Union, where she works with her fellow board members and BCU staff to promote bicycling as a viable and accessible mode of transportation for all ages and abilities.

Angela hails from the land of twenty-odd lane freeways and Ford F-350s, a.k.a. Houston, Texas, and moved to Boston in 2012 to complete a MS in Urban and Regional Policy from Northeastern University. She likes to probe deeper into how broader American culture has fostered a sense of identity with the transportation modes we’ve chosen - or have been encouraged to choose - for better or worse, and how this manifests itself in planning & policy.
Kate Fichter
Assistant Secretary for Policy Coordination, Massachusetts Department of Transportation
Kate Fichter is the Assistant Secretary for Policy Coordination at the Massachusetts Department of Transportation, where she has served in various capacities since 2004. Kate is a graduate of the University of Chicago and MIT, and has professional expertise in transportation planning and policy. Prior to her current role, Kate served as the Project Manager for the extension of the MBTA Green Line to Somerville and Medford and the expansion of Boston South Station. She has also worked for the US Department of Transportation, and for the Massachusetts Legislature, where she worked on transportation-related issues. Kate is now responsible for overseeing multiple policy initiatives at MassDOT, including de-carbonization and other issues at the intersection of the transportation and climate arenas.
Sasha Manoosingh
General Manager, Motivate
10:00 AM
Vision 2025: Tech Taking on Government’s Problems

Location: 6th Floor D5

Technology is reinventing the way people and goods move from point A to point B. Apps, gadgets and AI are all converging to offer creative and novel solutions to mobility issues of all kinds. But, are these tech solutions addressing the right issues? What is required for these technological developments to serve society’s needs and increase sustainability? This panel will explore the latest innovations in mobility technology, ranging from infrastructure tech to sharing platforms and big data analytics, and analyze them from a sustainability perspective.
MODERATOR Dante Ramos
Senior Editor, The Atlantic
Dante Ramos is a senior editor at The Atlantic. He was previously an opinion columnist and Ideas editor at The Boston Globe and a reporter, opinion writer, and editor at The Times-Picayune in New Orleans. He has written extensively about transportation and development. He was a Pulitzer Prize finalist for his editorials on how a buttoned-down culture limits Boston's vitality.
Eleanor Joseph
Director of Business Development, Via
Eleanor Joseph is a Director of Business Development at Via, where she helps lead the company’s public sector portfolio. Eleanor uses her municipal government experience, policy acumen, and business degree to help U.S. cities and transit agencies identify opportunities to deploy Via's on-demand transit technology into public fleets, and on behalf of cities, building increasingly sustainable, equitable, environmentally friendly transportation ecosystems. Eleanor arrived at Via after four years in the private sector, two years at a large international foundation, and a year in public service as a Policy Advisor to City of Boston Mayor Martin J. Walsh. Eleanor uses her multi-sector experience to foster strong public-private partnerships.
Justin Holmes
Director of corporate communications & public policy, Zipcar
Justin is Zipcar’s director of corporate communications and public policy where he leads efforts to promote Zipcar’s brand of “wheels when you want them” to Zipcar members, city leaders, media and other stakeholders. Leveraging his experience in technology as well as public and government relations, Justin works with cities and policy makers to help accelerate the adoption of car sharing as a vital, sustainable part of the urban transportation ecosystem. Before joining Zipcar, Justin served as chief information officer to Boston Mayor Martin Walsh, where he led a number of initiatives to use technology to make the city work smarter and serve its citizens better. He is a native Bostonian and graduate of the College of the Holy Cross.
John Burgoyne
Program Associate, BCG Centre for Public Impact
John Burgoyne works for the Centre for Public Impact (CPI), a global nonpartisan, not-for-profit organization founded by the Boston Consulting Group. CPI is committed to developing breakthrough ideas and partnering with governments and other changemakers to translate those ideas into action. John contributes to the City Innovation work in North America, where the team helps cities innovate with intention to address the most pressing challenges facing their residents. He helped lead Mobiliti, a cross-sectoral co-design session that led to the development of 20 transportation pilots for the city of Pittsburgh. Prior to joining CPI, John worked at Mission Measurement, a social impact consulting firm, where he built an evidence base that helps organizations measure and improve their impact. He earned his Bachelor’s degree in urban geography from Dartmouth College.
11:00 AM
Mass Mobilization: How Local Stakeholders are Identifying and Collaboratively Addressing Mobility Challenges in the Commonwealth

Location: 6th Floor D3& D4

As we move into the future of transportation and we watch the former predominantly analog world digitize into the palm of our hands, we’re left with huge questions of access, scale, and sustainability. In this panel we will be diving into the local perspective to understand how various stakeholders are addressing these challenges given particular Massachusetts-specific constraints. How does the state with the oldest continuously running streetcar in the world develop and/or update the infrastructure needed for transportation 2.0? How does Massachusetts prepare to address the issue of congestion when according to a report by research firm INRIX, its capital city wasted an average of 164 hours in traffic in 2018 (the highest in nation)? How much of the state’s $17.2 billion transportation capital budget will go towards these innovations, and how will public/private partnerships impact and shape the use of these taxpayer dollars? This context-specific lens will help to understand if/how these concerns translate to other places and mobility issues, and present the opportunity for dialogue around solutions being implemented, considered, or in need of policy-based or technological innovation.
MODERATOR Ceasar McDowell
Professor of Civic Design and Co-Chair, MCP Program, MIT Urban Planning
Ceasar L. McDowell is Professor of the Practice of Civic Design at MIT. His current work is on the design of civic infrastructures and processes to connect the increasingly demographically complex public. Ceasar teaches on civic and community engagement and the use of social media to enhance both. Ceasar brings his deep commitment to the work of building beloved, just and equitable communities that can – as his friend Carl Moore says – ”struggle with the traditions that bind them and the interests that separate them so they can build a future that is an improvement on the past.”

Ceasar is the founder podcast series TheMove , MIT's CO-Lab and co-initiator of America’s Path Forward. Outside of MIT Ceasar firm Civic Designers LLC works with organizations ranging from Massport and the Kendal Square Association to, the Obama and W.K. Kellogg Foundations and Beyond Conflict on public participation, community engagement and civic leadership.

Dr. McDowell served as Director of the global civic engagement organization Dropping Knowledge International, President of Interaction Institute for Social Change, co-founder of The Civil Rights Forum on Telecommunications Policy, and founding Board member of The Algebra Project. Engagement Projects include GoBoston 2030, Springfield Northend Campaign, 21Days, Cambridge, MA and Global Table of Free Voice, Berlin.
Chris Dempsey
Director, Transportation for Massachusetts
Chris Dempsey serves as Director of Transportation for Massachusetts, a diverse coalition of more than 70 member and partner organizations with a stake in improving transportation across the Commonwealth. Chris was formerly Assistant Secretary of Transportation for the Commonwealth. In that role, he co-founded the MBTA’s open-data program, which was named Innovation of the Year by WTS-Massachusetts in 2010. Chris has also worked as a consultant at Bain & Co., on a number of local and statewide political campaigns including that of Congressman Joe Kennedy III, and at a transportation technology startup that provides mobile ticketing for transit systems in New York, Boston, and Los Angeles. Chris is a graduate of Pomona College (B.A., 2005) and Harvard Business School (M.B.A, 2012). Chris has taught transportation policy at the graduate level at Northeastern University. In 2015, Chris was named Bostonian of the Year by the Boston Globe Magazine for his volunteer work leading No Boston Olympics. Chris is a lifelong transit rider who has never owned a car.
Chris Osgood
Mayor Walsh's Chief of the Streets, Transportation & Sanitation, City of Boston
Chris Osgood serves as Mayor Walsh's Chief of the Streets, Transportation & Sanitation. He works with the Public Works and Transportation Departments to deliver exceptional City services, build great streets, and implement a transportation plan that works for everyone.
Prior to serving in this role, Chris co- founded, in 2010, the Mayor's Office of New Urban Mechanics, a nationally replicated civic innovation group that experiments with new ways of using data, design and technology to improve the constituent experience.
Osgood joined the City in 2006, serving as a Mayoral Policy Advisor and working on the team that implemented the City's performance management program and rebuilt its 24-hour hotline. Chris is a graduate of City Year, Haverford College and the Harvard Business School.
Matthew Ciborowski
Senior Planner, Arup
Matthew Ciborowski is a Senior Planner in Arup’s Boston office with 10 years of experience in the public and private sectors. His work to date has focused on the Boston area through positions with the state department of transportation (MassDOT) and transit authority (MBTA), and he has worked across the United States in previous roles. He received both bachelor's and master's degrees from MIT's Department of Urban Studies and Planning.
Matthew’s experience includes service planning, alternatives analysis, economic development, environmental review, and the integration of engineering services. He has extensive project management experience, having managed multi-million-dollar planning studies and P3 efforts, most of which are now in the implementation phase.
Having advised a number of MassDOT Secretaries and MBTA General Managers as well as elected officials in Massachusetts, Matthew is well positioned to understand the interface between technical planning and political reality. His policy work for both MassDOT and the MBTA has progressed into investment strategy for both agencies.
As the leader of Arup’s Boston Planning practice, Matthew delivers projects for public and private sector clients that shape the future of our cities. His key areas of focus include fare and pricing policy, passenger facility design, transit micro-investments, the integration of emerging technologies into existing networks, the interface between planning and engineering, bridging the gap between government regimes, and P3 financing strategy.
Gretchen Effgen
VP of Global Partnerships, Aptiv Autonomous Mobility
Gretchen Effgen is VP of Global Partnerships for Aptiv Autonomous Mobility, where she leads the company’s go-to-market team in developing and executing the strategy and partnerships required to bring autonomous vehicles to market. A former Zipcar executive, Gretchen was responsible for the company’s strategic partnership initiatives, including those with Ford, Honda, Toyota. These partnerships were some of the earliest collaborations between the then-emerging mobility-as-a-service industry and established OEMs. She was awarded a specially-created Zipcar Innovator award in 2012. She serves on the Board of Directors of CivicSmart, a globally deployed V2X parking solutions provider, where she fulfilled an interim executive role on mobility services. Gretchen convened the Boston Mobility Roundtable in 2016, is a three-time appointee to the World Economic Forum’s Global Future Councils and served on the Commission on the Future of Transportation at the appointment of Massachusetts Governor Charlie Baker.
11:00 AM
Rethinking Infrastructure for the Future of Mobility

Location: 6th Floor D5

New mobility technologies are revolutionizing the way people travel and the use of urban space. How should governments be thinking about integrating ridesharing, micromobilty, electric vehicles, and autonomous vehicles into the existing urban infrastructure network? How can private companies and governments work together to ensure the optimal roll-out of these technologies, especially given the large upfront cost and long lifespan of infrastructure investments? And when should all of this happen? This panel will explore all of the pertinent opportunities and challenges facing government and companies alike in the integration of new mobility technologies into urban infrastructure paying attention to access/equity, and the environmental impact of massive infrastructure investments.
MODERATOR Andrew Hawkins
Transportation Reporter, The Verge
Andrew is a senior transportation reporter at The Verge, where he covers self-driving cars, flying cars, ride-hailing services like Uber and Lyft, public transportation, infrastructure, electric scooters, the hyperloop, and anything that involves the physical act of moving through space and time. Prior to this, he wrote about politics at Crain's New York Business and the New York Daily News. He lives in Brooklyn with his wife, two kids, and many different brands of peanut butter.
Colin Murchie
Senior Director of Business Development, Utilities and Public Partnerships, EVgo
Colin Murchie is the Senior Director of Business Development, Utilities and Public Partnerships for EVgo, the nation’s largest fast charging network for electric vehicles.
He brings more than 15 years of experience in the solar energy industry to his new role at EVgo, previously working at the intersection of infrastructure deployment, finance, and public policy. His prior roles span leadership roles during the exponential growth of real-world cleantech infrastructure deployment in the solar energy space, including State and Federal government affairs, business development and commercial sales/account management, and wholesale energy markets in the solar energy and cleantech space. His previous professional history includes positions with Sol Systems, SolarCity (now Tesla), SunEdison, and the Solar Energy Industries Association. He holds an MBA from the University of Maryland and a BS from Cornell University’s College of Agriculture and Life Sciences.
Melinda Hanson
Senior Manager for Sustainability, Bird
Melinda Hanson joined Bird from the National Association of City Transportation Officials, where she served as deputy director of NACTO's international programs. Before that, Melinda was a consultant for the Asian Development Bank, helping design and implement public transit projects in Pakistan and the Philippines. Earlier in her career, she was a founding staff member of the ClimateWorks Foundation, where she oversaw the sustainable transport portfolio.
Willa Ng
Director of Mobility- Streets, Urban Systems, Sidewalk Labs
Willa Ng is Director of Mobility – Streets, Urban Systems at Sidewalk Labs. Her background is in transportation engineering and community engagement, with a focus on parking and transportation demand management.

At the City of Berkeley, Willa implemented a demand-responsive parking program, as well as transit and biking programs, under the city’s goBerkeley pilot. Willa previously worked at the New York City Department of Transportation managing the PARK Smart value-pricing program, the parking technology pilot program, two community-based transportation pilots, and the congestion pricing proposal environmental review.

Willa began as a transportation engineer at AECOM. She graduated from UC-Berkeley with an MS in transportation engineering and from MIT with BS degrees in civil engineering and management. She is a proud native New Yorker and recreational eater.
Nigel Jacob
Co-Founder, City of Boston, Office of New Urban Mechanics
Nigel Jacob is the Co-founder of the Mayor’s Office of New Urban Mechanics, a civic innovation incubator and R&D Lab within Boston’s City Hall. Nigel’s work is about making urban life better via innovative, people-oriented applications of technology and design. Prior to joining the City of Boston in 2006, Nigel worked in a series of technology start-ups in the Boston area.
He was also previously the Urban Technologist in Residence at Living Cities, a philanthropic collaboration of 22 of the world’s largest foundations and financial institutions, is currently a board member at organizations such as Code For America and coUrbanize, and is an Executive-in-Residence at Boston University.
Nigel’s work has been written about extensively in magazines such as Wired, MIT Technology Review, Fast Company and books including The Responsive City, by Stephen Goldsmith and Susan Crawford and Smart Cities by Anthony Townsend.
This ground-breaking work has earned Nigel a number of awards including being named a Public Official of the year in 2011 by Governing Magazine, a Whitehouse Champion of Change and the Tribeca Disruptive Innovation award for 2012. Nigel is also a 12th level Wizard-Pirate with a special focus on causing chaos in large municipal bureaucracies via befuddlement spells.
Andrew Salzberg
Head of Transportation Policy and Research, Uber
As Uber’s Head of Transportation Policy and Research, Andrew focuses on making Uber an integral part of the future of urban transportation through research, partnerships, and policy development. He joined Uber in 2013 and became the Senior Operations Manager for New York City, Uber’s largest global market, before joining the global policy team. Prior to joining Uber, Andrew worked at the World Bank supporting public transportation investment projects in East Asia. He holds a bachelor of civil engineering degree from McGill University and Master in Urban Planning degree from Harvard University.
12:00 PM
Lunch Showcase: MIT Mobility World

Location: 7th Floor Salon West

Just as the car replaced the horse-drawn carriage in a matter of decades, there are technologies out there that have the potential to totally upend our understanding of transportation today. This showcase will offer an opportunity for participants to interact with cutting edge technologies that have the potential to upend transportation as we know it today. Drones, AV bikes...no cars at all?
MIT Solve
https://solve.mit.edu,
MIT Solve is a marketplace for social impact. We find tech entrepreneurs from around the world and broker partnerships across our community to scale their innovative work—driving lasting, transformational change.

Solve issues four Challenges each year to find the most promising Solver teams with solutions to the world's most pressing problems. Solve then deploys its global community of private, public, and nonprofit leaders to form the partnerships these Solver teams need to scale their impact.

In the last two years, Solve's cross-sector community has committed more than $7 million in funding to Solver teams, in addition to in-kind support such as mentorship, technical expertise, media and conference exposure, and business and entrepreneurship training.
City Science
https://www.media.mit.edu/projects/mod/overview/,
The PEV (Persuasive Electric Vehicle) provides an alternate option to private heavy machines, as an electric, shared robotic solution. We propose that new mobility systems must be explored to meet the profound challenges of the future and to enable dynamic and evolving places that respond to the complexities of life.
City Scanner
http://senseable.mit.edu/cityscanner/,
City Scanner proposes a drive-by solution to capture the spatiotemporal variation in environmental indicators in urban areas, such as air quality or the thermal flux of the built environment. Instead of deploying a dedicated fleet, we have deployed various types of environmental sensors on garbage trucks in the City of Cambridge.
Joro
https://joro.tech,
Joro is building an app and community that makes it easy to automatically track and improve your carbon footprint.
MIT Sustainable Logistics Initiative
http://sustainablelogistics.mit.edu/,
[1] The “Green home delivery consolidation” focuses on testing the environmental effects of extending time delivery window from 1-2 to 4-5 days via the transportation consolidation of home deliveries.

[2] The “Topography routing problem” project focuses on analyzing, how to improve routing transportation decisions?, What is the effect of topography in routing decisions? and when solutions affected by topography affect the distance-min route
MIT Hyperloop II
https://www.mithyperloop.mit.edu/,
The MIT Hyperloop Team is designing and building a prototype to compete in Space X’s annual Hyperloop Pod Competition (July 2019). The pod design competition is intended to increase participation and promote innovation in what will undoubtedly be a monumental engineering challenge. The ultimate vision of the Hyperloop is to have transport pods glide >800mph through a partially vacuumed tube. Hyperloop has the potential to transform personal and freight transportation as we know it.

The MIT team is excited to be a part of this competition and aspires to help make the Hyperloop dream a reality. Alongside mentorship from renowned MIT professors, our team brings together significant depts in knowledge and experience. Through cross disciplinary collaboration across mechanical engineering, systems engineering, structural engineering, and business, we hope to showcase MIT’s engineering caliber and truly make an impact in the frontier of transportation.
The Okoa Project
http://theokoaproject.com,
The Okoa Project is a nonprofit dedicated to developing creative technologies to increase access to healthcare in these communities. We are a group of MIT engineers who are working in collaboration with Tanzanian innovation centers and community leaders, to achieve this goal. Over the past 3 years we have developed a motorcycle ambulance trailer that can transport a patient, medical supplies and one other person. Our locally made trailer can attach to any motorcycle and be integrated into existing taxi norms, making it a realistic and affordable solution.
12:45 PM
Lunch Keynote: The Geography of Innovation

Location: 7th Floor MIT

Introducing sustainability into the future of mobility is far from a one-size-fits-all challenge. Different countries—and different communities—have different transportation needs and different societal end goals. Reynold D'Silva from Go-Jek, Indonesia’s unicorn TNC (Transportation Network Company), will dive into the subject of geographic differences in the realm of sustainable mobility. He will discuss the rise of the company, its structure, and different needs and demand that they have found in different markets.
Reynold D'Silva
Senior Vice President, Head of Data Marketing Innovation, Go-Jek
Reynold is Senior Vice President at Go-Jek, which has combined smartphone-based technology and motorcycles to provide people with traffic-beating rides, piping-hot food delivery, electronic payments online and offline, in-home beauty treatments and many other life-enhancing conveniences. He heads Data Monetization, Marketing Solutions and Brand Partnerships, working with a team of product marketers, data scientists and developers to create marketing tools and solutions that help our brand partners to grow.

In previous roles, Reynold learned how to create cocktails and design dining experiences at the Taj Group of Hotels, managed sales and shopper activation for Modern Trade at Hindustan Lever, developed brands, products, advertising and digital innovation in Home & Personal Care at Unilever and led sales and marketing for Brands and E-Commerce at Facebook APAC.
1:40 PM
Sustainable Mobility: The Challenge of Balancing Innovation with Social and Economic Equity

Location: 6th Floor D3& D4

As technological innovation makes seismic waves in mobility, not everyone benefits equally. Thus, there is a growing need for the private and public sectors to collaborate and ensure that gains are shared. These two sectors will need to find ways of aligning incentives in order to effectively manage major socio-economic challenges including: transportation access, improving social inclusion, creating jobs, and reducing vehicle congestion. This panel dives into current equity challenges within the mobility landscape and explores how the public and private sectors can work together to address them.
MODERATOR Zeninjor Enwemeka
Reporter, WBUR
Zeninjor Enwemeka is a reporter at WBUR, Boston's NPR station, where she covers news both online and on air. She reports on business, tech and culture as part of WBUR's Bostonomix team, which focuses on the innovation economy. Before joining WBUR, she worked at The Boston Globe as a breaking news writer for Boston.com. She also spent several years as a news/homepage producer for the website. Zeninjor was part of the 2014 Pulitzer Prize-winning team for The Boston Globe's breaking news coverage of the Boston Marathon bombings.

She was also an adjunct lecturer at Boston University, where she taught a class on multimedia and online journalism. Zeninjor is a graduate of the Medill School of Journalism at Northwestern University. She serves as the
secretary of the Boston Association of Black Journalists.
Paul Healy
JD Candidate at Yale Law, Contributor to oxford Urbanists, Oxford Urbanists
Paul Healy is a student at Yale Law School, where he focuses on the relationship between law and economic development. He also holds a master’s degree in development economics from Oxford University, where he focused on the spatial components of development—for instance, his dissertation evaluated the effect of a national highway project on crop markets in India. He also contributed to the Oxford Urbanists, including writing several articles about mobility. Prior to graduate school, Paul was a consultant at McKinsey & Co., where he worked with transit agencies, city and state governments, and investors on mobility and infrastructure projects. He also did a brief stint at a mobility tech startup in South Africa called WhereIsMyTransport, supporting the company’s social impact team and preparing for future fundraising rounds.
Ammar Malik
Associate Director of Research, Evidence for Policy Design at the Harvard Kennedy School
Ammar A. Malik is the Associate Director of Research at Evidence for Policy Design at the Harvard Kennedy School. Ammar’s research focuses on spatial urban forms and their economic implications, the political economy of public service delivery, and the distributional effects of urban public transport. For his work on the economic impact of sexual harassment in urban public spaces, he was awarded the World Bank Group and Sexual Violence Research Initiative’s 2017 Development Marketplace Innovation Award.

Before joining EPoD, Ammar was a Senior Research Associate at the Urban Institute in Washington D.C. He has also previously worked at the World Bank, International Food Policy Research Institute, Pakistan’s National Disaster Management Authority and Standard Chartered Bank.

Ammar holds a Ph.D. in Public Policy from George Mason University, MA in Public Affairs from Institut d’Etudes Politiques (Sciences Po) Paris, MA in Public Policy from the National University of Singapore, and BA in Economics and Mathematics from the Lahore University of Management Sciences.
Kathryn Carlson
Director of Transportation, A Better City
Kathryn Carlson joined A Better City in August 2017 as the Director of Transportation. In this role, she directs the transportation research and policy agendas for the organization as well as oversees the two Transportation Management Associations (TMAs).

Prior to joining A Better City, Kathryn founded Buca Boot LLC, a bicycle product company and invented their flagship product, the Buca Boot, a patented bike-mounted storage system that won Inc. Magazine’s “Best In Class” Design Award in 2015.

Previously, her professional experiences encompass research and policy positions. She spent eight years as a research analyst and economist at Fidelity Investments in Boston covering energy and commodity markets. From 2003-2005, Kathryn served in the Administration of Wisconsin Governor Jim Doyle as a senior-level appointee at the Department of Financial Institutions – the state banking and securities regulator where she managed all legislative, policy and communications functions of the department.

She is a board member of the LivableStreets Alliance in Boston and holds both Bachelors of Arts and Masters of Science degrees in Economics from Wellesley College and the London School of Economics, respectively.
Joël Hazan
Head of "Future of Mobility", BCG
Joël Hazan is a core member of the Consumer, and the Marketing, Sales & Pricing practices of The Boston Consulting Group. Joël is also a BCG Henderson Institute fellow, exploring the future of mobility. Since joining BCG in 2005, Joël has advised several global leading consumer products, luxury, and transportation and mobility players. Joël launched and piloted Mobility Nation, a unique initiative that brought together public and private, startups and research institutes around the definition of a vision for Mobility in 2030 in the Paris region. Additionally, Joël leads BCG’s work in railways around the world. On this topic, he has deep experience in strategy, network optimization, marketing, and operations.
1:40 PM
People and Goods Transportation: Tech Synergies for Lasting Sustainability?

Location: 6th Floor D5

Within cities, people and goods have traditionally travelled on different vehicles and had different origins and destinations. Yet, today e-commerce is changing customer behavior and urban logistics patterns, increasing the number of last mile vehicles while complexifying urban logistics operations. With the aim of rendering cities more livable, reducing vehicle miles traveled, and allowing for sustainable urban transportation, could goods and people transportation exploit their once siloed technologies/industries to learn from one another and explore potential synergies?
MODERATOR Brooke McKenna
Department of Traffic, Parking & Transportation, Cambridge, MA, Assistant Director for Street Management
Brooke McKenna is the Assistant Director for Street Management with the Department of Traffic, Parking & Transportation in Cambridge, MA. In this role, Brooke is responsible for overseeing the safe operation of Cambridge’s street network and leading the City’s Vision Zero Initiative. Brooke previously spent ten years with the New York City Department of Transportation.
Josué Velázquez-Martínez
Director of MIT CTL Sustainable Logistics Initiative, MIT CTL
Josué C. Velázquez Martínez is a Research Scientist at the MIT Center for Transportation and Logistics specialized in Logistics and Supply Chain Management in manufacturing, food, and retail industries, and has vast experience in conducting applied research on Sustainable Logistics in emerging markets. Dr. Velázquez Martínez leads two research streamlines: the MIT Sustainable Logistics Initiative, which involves research projects on green logistics sponsored by multinational companies, with the purpose of improving fuel consumption and CO2 emissions in logistics operations, and the MIT GeneSys, which aims to improve the efficiency of small firms, and involves on-site research at approximately 200 small enterprises across Latin America in collaboration with the region’s top universities. Dr. Velázquez Martínez also serves as the Executive Director of the MIT Supply Chain Management Blended Program, an elite program that allows learners to combine the MITx MicroMasters credential with one+ semester at MIT. As a part of his teaching activities, Dr. Velázquez Martínez is a frequent lecturer in the Executive Education courses at the center, and he is also the lead instructor of the graduate course SCM.290 Sustainable Supply Chain Management at MIT.
Omar Hoda
Principal, Deloitte
Omar Hoda is a principal at Deloitte who serves transportation and automotive clients. As part of the Deloitte’s strategy practice, Monitor-Deloitte, he focuses in the areas of corporate and business unit strategy, innovation, marketing and commercial strategy.
Over the past several years he has served as the Transportation and Automotive Lead for Deloitte’s Future of Mobility Initiative – which focuses on the cross-industry disruption that is occurring as a result of autonomous technologies and the sharing economy. Prior to his focus on the auto and transportation sectors he served clients in the technology, media and telecommunications sector advising them around the disruption driven by internet technologies and the information economy.
Mr. Hoda, began his career as an engineer and entrepreneur with a number of enterprise software and telecommunications equipment manufacturers. Mr. Hoda holds a Bachelor’s and Master’s Degree in Computer Science from the University of Massachusetts and Boston University respectively, as well as a MBA from Babson College. He lives in the suburbs of Boston with his wife and two daughters.
Patrick Browne
Director of Global Sustainability, UPS
Patrick Browne serves as Director of Global Sustainability for UPS, a worldwide leader in supply chain and logistics solutions. Working with cross-functional teams and executive leadership, Patrick leads strategies and initiatives to advance the company’s long-term sustainability vision.

Patrick has managed UPS’s sustainability programs since 2008, including overseeing the company’s global GHG inventory and reporting, and has held various assignments in Plant Engineering and Environmental Affairs during his 30-year tenure with UPS.

Patrick is an active participant in organizations focused on advancing sustainable business practices around the world, including BSR’s Future of Fuels working group and Global Reporting Initiative’s GOLD Community.
William Chernicoff
Senior Manager, Global Research & Innovation Toyota Mobility Foundation
Dr. Chernicoff currently serves as the Senior Manager of Global Research and Innovation for the Toyota Mobility Foundation. He defines and coordinates the foundation’s research agenda, initiatives, programs, and provides technology guidance to projects. With both near- and long-term perspectives, Dr. Chernicoff helps conceive, identify, and execute new technology approaches that enable and improve the solutions implemented by the foundation and its partners. He brings a strong background across energy, technology, mobility, and climate policy from his prior work as a Manager and Principle Researcher with Toyota North America’s Energy & Environmental Research Group and his eight years with the US DOT’s Research Administration.
Dr. Chernicoff earned a Bachelor of Science in Materials Science and Engineering at M.I.T., a Master of Science in Manufacturing Engineering from Boston University, and a Ph.D. in Systems Engineering and Engineering Management at the George Washington University.
2:40 PM
Plenary Panel: The Future of Mobility- Who Should be Responsible for Which Investment and Where?

Location: 7th Floor MIT

Far from the old car/public transportation dichotomy, mobility today is a cluttered field featuring all kinds of services, apps and systems. Public transit is suddenly just one of many options to get from Point A to Point B, accompanied by TNC (Transportation Network Company) rides, scooters, shared bikes and everything in between. This, in turn, has sparked rumblings that mobility might be moving in the direction of being a service rather than a public good. If so, who is responsible for investing in this new tech that has the potential to drastically affect the lives of citizens? Should governments offer incentives for businesses to ensure that their innovations are sustainable? How can public private partnerships offer more tailored solutions? What legacy mobility items need to be preserved and what can we look to the future to solve? The questions are endless. This panel promises to solve them all.
MODERATOR Molly Turner
Professor, UC Berkeley
Molly Turner is an urban innovation pioneer and a leading expert on technology startups and cities. Through her teaching at Haas and her work in the field, she has shaped the contemporary conversation about technology’s impacts on urban life and governance. At Haas, Turner teaches the popular class Tech and the City: How to Get Urban Innovation Right to graduate MBAs. She is also the co-host and co-producer of the podcast Technopolis from Atlantic Media and CityLab. Turner is deeply engaged in contemporary tech and urban policy issues through her advisory role with civic tech startups, and board membership of urban policy think tank SPUR.

Turner was an early employee of Airbnb, where she established the company’s public policy team in 2011 and directed its groundbreaking regulatory collaboration with cities. As the Global Head of Civic Partnerships, Turner directed Airbnb’s partnerships with governments around the world, including its international disaster response program, neighborhood tourism development program, and 2015 launch in Cuba. Before Airbnb, Turner worked for the San Francisco Mayor’s Office of Economic Development, the UNESCO World Heritage Cities Program, and an urban planning consulting firm. Turner holds a Master in Urban Planning from Harvard University and a BA from Dartmouth College.
Marc Klein
Vice President of Data and Digital Advocacy Solutions, Majority Strategies LLC
Marc Klein is the Vice President of Data and Digital Advocacy Solutions at Majority Strategies LLC. With over 20 years of experience, Majority Strategies offers a wide range of specialized product solutions focused on awareness, persuasion and activation of voters, constituents, consumers, elected officials, and membership organizations through analytical targeting, data-driven messaging, and omni-channel voter contact, including digital, mobile, and print advertising.

Most recently, Mr. Klein was the Vice President of Microtransit Government Partnerships at Chariot Transit, Inc., which is owned by Ford Smart Mobility LLC, and he focused on improving Sustainability, Accessibility, and Automobility options for the residents and visitors of cities across America. Mr. Klein is a member of the Chairman’s Council at Bette Midler’s “New York Restoration Project” and is on the Executive Advisory Board at Techweek. Mr. Klein was Vice President of National Accounts and Airports at Clean Energy Fuels Corp., which is the largest provider of natural gas fuel for fleets in North America.

Mr. Klein is a Co-Founder of The Vehicle Production Group which manufactured the MV-1, the first factory-direct vehicle that meets the vehicle guidelines of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) and runs on clean-burning natural gas. More than 500 MV-1’s operate today in New York City as part of the MTA's Access-A-Ride paratransit fleet. In 2011, Mr. Klein was selected by the White House as a “Champion of Change” in the fields of sustainability and accessibility. Mr. Klein also served as President and CEO of the London Fleet Companies that acquired the North American distribution, sales, and advertising rights for the world-famous London Taxi (U.S. left-hand drive model). By trade, Mr. Klein is a commercial business lawyer who represented commercial banks and finance companies and he is admitted to practice law in New York and Connecticut.
Clara Brenner
Co-founder and Managing Partner, Urban Innovation Fund
Clara is co-founder and Managing Partner of the Urban Innovation Fund, a venture capital firm that invests in the future of cities. The fund provides seed capital and regulatory support to entrepreneurs solving our toughest urban challenges – helping them grow into tomorrow’s most valued companies.
Previously, she co-founded Tumml, a startup hub for urban tech. The organization has provided 38 startups with seed funding and mentorship, and hosts thought leadership events around urban innovation. In 2014, Forbes listed her as one of its “30 Under 30” for Social Entrepreneurship. Clara’s work energizing urban entrepreneurship has been featured in numerous press outlets, including MSNBC and TechCrunch, among others. She serves on the Board of Tumml, as well as the Local Initiatives Support Corporation (LISC) Bay Area Local Advisory Committee. Clara earned her MBA from MIT Sloan and BA from NYU.
Rich Davey
Associate Director, BCG
Rich is an Associate Director at the Boston Consulting Group’s New York office working with the Public Sector practice areas, and leads BCG’s State and Local Public Sector Practice. Since joining BCG, Rich has advised public transportation and transit systems, railroads, highway operators and private transportation firms across a wide variety of topics.

Prior to joining BCG, Rich had a 15 years of C-suite experience in high profile, publicly accountable organizations in state government and the private sector. Rich served as the Secretary and Chief Executive Officer of the Massachusetts Department of Transportation (“MassDOT”) from September 2011 until October 2014. Under Rich’s leadership, MassDOT was credited with implementing reforms that improved customer service and saved taxpayer money, pushed for accelerated construction procurement and techniques that improved on-time and on-budget metrics, championed P3s, and used innovation and technology to improve service delivery. Rich was also credited with steadily guiding MassDOT through numerous crises, including two historic blizzards and the Boston Marathon bombings.

Prior to serving as Secretary, Rich served as the General Manager of the Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority (“MBTA”) the 5th largest public transit system in the United States. Rich was able to effectively manage the MBTA during time of fiscal challenges by achieving both a balanced budget and the highest annual ridership since 1946. And just prior to joining BCG, Rich served as the CEO of Boston 2024, the organization that sought to bring the 2024 Summer Olympic and Paralympic Games to Boston.

He is a graduate of the College of the Holy Cross in Worcester, MA and holds a juris doctorate, summa cum laude,from Gonzaga University School of Law in Spokane, WA and live in the Back Bay with his wife, Jane Willis.
Seleta Reynolds
General Manager, Los Angeles Department of Transportation
Seleta Reynolds is General Manager of the Los Angeles Department of Transportation (LADOT) appointed by the Administration of Mayor Eric Garcetti. Ms. Reynolds is responsible for implementing Great Streets for
Los Angeles, a plan to reduce traffic fatalities, double the number of people riding bikes, and expand access to integrated transportation choices for Angelenos and the region.
Ms. Reynolds has over 20 years of transportation experience throughout the United States. She has advised transportation technology companies like WalkScore, contributed to the state-of-the-practice as an Association of Pedestrian and Bicycle Professionals Board Member, mentored young professionals through Women’s Transportation Seminar, and nurtured research on Transportation Research Board committees. Ms. Reynolds serves as the President of the National Association for City Transportation Officials.
4:00 PM
Closing Keynote: Innovation and Turmoil in the Transportation Sector- Where Can it Take Us?

Location: 7th Floor MIT

As we will see throughout the day, ongoing innovation in the transportation sector is offering unheard of opportunities for growth and progress both in cities and beyond. Yet innovation is invariably connected to turmoil—and the challenge of the new: how to adopt policies and build a new regulatory structure around innovation so that it can be properly harnessed and work towards desirable end goals? And do we even know what those desirable end goals are? What kind of future and what kinds of cities do we really want to build? Robin Chase, co-founder and former CEO of Zipcar, will dive into the pressing questions raised throughout the day’s conference, offering insights into how best to chart a path forward.
Robin Chase
Co-Founder and Former CEO, Zipcar
Robin Chase is a transportation entrepreneur. She is co-founder and former CEO of Zipcar, the largest car-sharing company in the world; as well as co-founder of Veniam, a network company that moves terabytes of data between vehicles and the cloud. Her recent book is Peers Inc: How People and Platforms are Inventing the Collaborative Economy and Reinventing Capitalism. Her current passion is working with cities to maximize the transformation possible with the introduction of self driving cars.

She sits on the Boards of the World Resources Institute and Tucows, and serves on the Dutch multinational DSM’s Sustainability Advisory Board. In the past, she has served on the boards of Veniam and the Massachusetts Department of Transportation, the French National Digital Agency, the National Advisory Council for Innovation & Entrepreneurship for the US Department of Commerce, the Intelligent Transportations Systems Program Advisory Committee for the US Department of Transportation, the OECD’s International Transport Forum Advisory Board, the Massachusetts Governor’s Transportation Transition Working Group, and Boston Mayor’s Wireless Task Force.
4:20 PM
Closing Remarks

Location: 7th Floor MIT

Jason Jay
Senior Lecturer and Director, SUSTAINABILITY INITIATIVE, MIT Sloan School of Management
Jason Jay is a Senior Lecturer at the MIT Sloan School of Management and Director of the Sustainability Initiative at MIT Sloan. His research focuses on how people navigate the tensions between personal, business, and social goals in sustainability efforts. His first book is Breaking Through Gridlock: The Power of Conversation in a Polarized World and he has published articles in the Academy of Management Journal and California Management Review. He teaches courses on strategy, innovation, and leadership for sustainable business at MIT, and engages students and alumni in hands-on projects with leading companies and organizations. Prior to MIT, Jason was a management consultant for Dialogos International, where he consulted on leadership development and organizational change for major international corporations and NGO's including BP and the World Bank. Jason holds a Ph.D. in Organization Studies from the MIT Sloan School of Management, and an AB and M.Ed from Harvard University. He lives in Newton, Massachusetts.
4:30 PM
Reception

Location: 7th Floor Salon West

Join us for a networking reception after the event!
Friday 26 April 2019
8:00 AM
Register/Breakfast

Location: 7th Floor Lobby

9:00 AM

Introductory Remarks

Location: 7th Floor MIT

READ MORE »
9:20 AM

Opening Keynote: What IS Sustainable Mobility?

Location: 7th Floor MIT

READ MORE »
10:00 AM

The Preeminence of the Car and US Exceptionalism

Location: 6th Floor D3& D4

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Vision 2025: Tech Taking on Government’s Problems

Location: 6th Floor D5

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11:00 AM

Mass Mobilization: How Local Stakeholders are Identifying and Collaboratively Addressing Mobility Challenges in the Commonwealth

Location: 6th Floor D3& D4

READ MORE »

Rethinking Infrastructure for the Future of Mobility

Location: 6th Floor D5

READ MORE »
12:00 PM

Lunch Showcase: MIT Mobility World

Location: 7th Floor Salon West

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12:45 PM

Lunch Keynote: The Geography of Innovation

Location: 7th Floor MIT

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1:40 PM

Sustainable Mobility: The Challenge of Balancing Innovation with Social and Economic Equity

Location: 6th Floor D3& D4

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People and Goods Transportation: Tech Synergies for Lasting Sustainability?

Location: 6th Floor D5

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2:40 PM

Plenary Panel: The Future of Mobility- Who Should be Responsible for Which Investment and Where?

Location: 7th Floor MIT

READ MORE »
4:00 PM

Closing Keynote: Innovation and Turmoil in the Transportation Sector- Where Can it Take Us?

Location: 7th Floor MIT

READ MORE »
4:20 PM

Closing Remarks

Location: 7th Floor MIT

READ MORE »
4:30 PM

Reception

Location: 7th Floor Salon West

READ MORE »


Session descriptions


Introductory Remarks

Location: 7th Floor MIT

David Keith
MITSUI CAREER DEVELOPMENT PROFESSOR AND ASSISTANT PROFESSOR OF SYSTEM DYNAMICS, MIT Sloan School of Management
Drawing on his experience working in the automotive industry, David studies consumer behavior, firm strategy and the formation of markets for emerging automotive technologies. His research examines issues including spatial patterns of technology adoption, supply constraints in production, platform competition, and the impact of new technologies on energy consumption and the environment.

David has received several awards for his research, including a Fulbright scholarship, an Alcoa Foundation Fellowship from the American-Australian Association, and a Martin Family Sustainability Fellowship from the MIT Energy Initiative. David previously worked for Holden, the Australian subsidiary of General Motors, and URS Corporation, a global engineering and environmental consultancy.

David holds BEng (Hons.), BCom, and MEnv degrees from the University of Melbourne (Australia) and a PhD from the MIT Engineering Systems Division.


Opening Keynote: What IS Sustainable Mobility?

Location: 7th Floor MIT

Sustainability and mobility: two buzzwords thrown around at will in today’s most pressing conversations, but what do they really mean? How do they relate to each other? And what can we do to more effectively intertwine them? Kent Larson, Director of City Science at the MIT Media Lab, will explore the core issues at stake in today’s landscape of sustainable mobility, introducing concrete measures of sustainability to be addressed in each of the day’s panel conversations and challenging panelists and attendees to work through today’s most difficult yet pressing sustainable mobility challenges.

Kent Larson
DIRECTOR OF CITY SCIENCE, MIT Media Lab
Kent Larson directs the City Science (formerly Changing Places) group at the MIT Media Lab. His research focuses on developing urban interventions that enable more entrepreneurial, livable, high-performance districts in cities. To that end, his projects include advanced simulation and augmented reality for urban design, transformable micro-housing for millennials, mobility-on-demand systems that create alternatives to private automobiles, and Urban Living Lab deployments in Hamburg, Andorra, Taipei, and Boston.

Larson and researchers from his group received the “10-Year Impact Award” from UbiComp 2014. This is a “test of time” award for work that, with the benefit of hindsight, has had the greatest impact over the previous decade.
Larson practiced architecture for 15 years in New York City, with design work published in Architectural Record, Progressive Architecture, Global Architecture, The New York Times, A+U, and Architectural Digest. The New York Times Review of Books selected his book, Louis I. Kahn: Unbuilt Masterworks (2000) as one of that year’s ten best books in architecture.


The Preeminence of the Car and US Exceptionalism

Location: 6th Floor D3& D4

The car has been king for the past 70 years. It is entrenched in American infrastructure, financial systems, and even cultural heritage. Cars have been one of the hallmarks of the American dream and freedom. In facing a new world of (seemingly) sustainable transportation innovations, how do we extract ourselves from the shadow of yesterday’s automobility and reimagine the next generation of transportation? Is it even feasible to envision a future without cars/personal motorized transportation? Or have we dug a hole too deep to get out of?

MODERATOR David Keith
MITSUI CAREER DEVELOPMENT PROFESSOR AND ASSISTANT PROFESSOR OF SYSTEM DYNAMICS, MIT Sloan School of Management
Drawing on his experience working in the automotive industry, David studies consumer behavior, firm strategy and the formation of markets for emerging automotive technologies. His research examines issues including spatial patterns of technology adoption, supply constraints in production, platform competition, and the impact of new technologies on energy consumption and the environment.

David has received several awards for his research, including a Fulbright scholarship, an Alcoa Foundation Fellowship from the American-Australian Association, and a Martin Family Sustainability Fellowship from the MIT Energy Initiative. David previously worked for Holden, the Australian subsidiary of General Motors, and URS Corporation, a global engineering and environmental consultancy.

David holds BEng (Hons.), BCom, and MEnv degrees from the University of Melbourne (Australia) and a PhD from the MIT Engineering Systems Division.


Jon Coleman
DIRECTOR OF CITY SOLUTIONS, Ford Smart Mobility, LLC
Dr. Jon Coleman is Director, City Solutions, Ford Smart Mobility, LLC. He leads Ford’s mobility policy and strategy efforts to engage municipalities in the implementation of solutions that address growing urban mobility needs. He plays a key role in connecting Ford’s internal capabilities and thought leadership with external partners to increase accessibility to everyone moving in and around cities and to the goods they need.
Jon has been involved with sustainability at Ford for almost 20 years working to embed advanced technologies into products and services. He has represented Ford at venues such as the United Nations, TED, the Clinton Global Initiative and the Academy of Management. His passion for sustainability is evident in his research focusing on how large organizations engage in sustainable behavior and how that decision making process can be embedded in an organization's day–to-day operations. Jon’s view of sustainability goes far beyond "green" to include human rights, urban mobility and societal well-being, embracing the ideal that true sustainability involves "doing more good, not doing less bad."
He earned his Bachelor’s degree in Marketing from Ohio State, his Master’s degree in Finance from Xavier and his Doctorate in Management from Case Western Reserve University.


Angela Johnson-Rodriguez
TRANSPORTATION JUSTICE ORGANIZER, Transportation for Massachusetts
Angela Johnson-Rodriguez is the Transportation Justice Organizer at Transportation for Massachusetts. She works with the coalition’s members and community-based organizations to promote equitable access to transportation all across the Commonwealth, and to help ensure fairness and opportunity as technology transforms mobility. Angela is also the Vice President of the Board of Directors at the Boston Cyclists Union, where she works with her fellow board members and BCU staff to promote bicycling as a viable and accessible mode of transportation for all ages and abilities.

Angela hails from the land of twenty-odd lane freeways and Ford F-350s, a.k.a. Houston, Texas, and moved to Boston in 2012 to complete a MS in Urban and Regional Policy from Northeastern University. She likes to probe deeper into how broader American culture has fostered a sense of identity with the transportation modes we’ve chosen - or have been encouraged to choose - for better or worse, and how this manifests itself in planning & policy.


Kate Fichter
ASSISTANT SECRETARY FOR POLICY COORDINATION, Massachusetts Department of Transportation
Kate Fichter is the Assistant Secretary for Policy Coordination at the Massachusetts Department of Transportation, where she has served in various capacities since 2004. Kate is a graduate of the University of Chicago and MIT, and has professional expertise in transportation planning and policy. Prior to her current role, Kate served as the Project Manager for the extension of the MBTA Green Line to Somerville and Medford and the expansion of Boston South Station. She has also worked for the US Department of Transportation, and for the Massachusetts Legislature, where she worked on transportation-related issues. Kate is now responsible for overseeing multiple policy initiatives at MassDOT, including de-carbonization and other issues at the intersection of the transportation and climate arenas.


Sasha Manoosingh
GENERAL MANAGER, Motivate


Vision 2025: Tech Taking on Government’s Problems

Location: 6th Floor D5

Technology is reinventing the way people and goods move from point A to point B. Apps, gadgets and AI are all converging to offer creative and novel solutions to mobility issues of all kinds. But, are these tech solutions addressing the right issues? What is required for these technological developments to serve society’s needs and increase sustainability? This panel will explore the latest innovations in mobility technology, ranging from infrastructure tech to sharing platforms and big data analytics, and analyze them from a sustainability perspective.

MODERATOR Dante Ramos
SENIOR EDITOR, The Atlantic
Dante Ramos is a senior editor at The Atlantic. He was previously an opinion columnist and Ideas editor at The Boston Globe and a reporter, opinion writer, and editor at The Times-Picayune in New Orleans. He has written extensively about transportation and development. He was a Pulitzer Prize finalist for his editorials on how a buttoned-down culture limits Boston's vitality.


Eleanor Joseph
DIRECTOR OF BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT, Via
Eleanor Joseph is a Director of Business Development at Via, where she helps lead the company’s public sector portfolio. Eleanor uses her municipal government experience, policy acumen, and business degree to help U.S. cities and transit agencies identify opportunities to deploy Via's on-demand transit technology into public fleets, and on behalf of cities, building increasingly sustainable, equitable, environmentally friendly transportation ecosystems. Eleanor arrived at Via after four years in the private sector, two years at a large international foundation, and a year in public service as a Policy Advisor to City of Boston Mayor Martin J. Walsh. Eleanor uses her multi-sector experience to foster strong public-private partnerships.


Justin Holmes
DIRECTOR OF CORPORATE COMMUNICATIONS & PUBLIC POLICY, Zipcar
Justin is Zipcar’s director of corporate communications and public policy where he leads efforts to promote Zipcar’s brand of “wheels when you want them” to Zipcar members, city leaders, media and other stakeholders. Leveraging his experience in technology as well as public and government relations, Justin works with cities and policy makers to help accelerate the adoption of car sharing as a vital, sustainable part of the urban transportation ecosystem. Before joining Zipcar, Justin served as chief information officer to Boston Mayor Martin Walsh, where he led a number of initiatives to use technology to make the city work smarter and serve its citizens better. He is a native Bostonian and graduate of the College of the Holy Cross.


John Burgoyne
PROGRAM ASSOCIATE, BCG Centre for Public Impact
John Burgoyne works for the Centre for Public Impact (CPI), a global nonpartisan, not-for-profit organization founded by the Boston Consulting Group. CPI is committed to developing breakthrough ideas and partnering with governments and other changemakers to translate those ideas into action. John contributes to the City Innovation work in North America, where the team helps cities innovate with intention to address the most pressing challenges facing their residents. He helped lead Mobiliti, a cross-sectoral co-design session that led to the development of 20 transportation pilots for the city of Pittsburgh. Prior to joining CPI, John worked at Mission Measurement, a social impact consulting firm, where he built an evidence base that helps organizations measure and improve their impact. He earned his Bachelor’s degree in urban geography from Dartmouth College.


Mass Mobilization: How Local Stakeholders are Identifying and Collaboratively Addressing Mobility Challenges in the Commonwealth

Location: 6th Floor D3& D4

As we move into the future of transportation and we watch the former predominantly analog world digitize into the palm of our hands, we’re left with huge questions of access, scale, and sustainability. In this panel we will be diving into the local perspective to understand how various stakeholders are addressing these challenges given particular Massachusetts-specific constraints. How does the state with the oldest continuously running streetcar in the world develop and/or update the infrastructure needed for transportation 2.0? How does Massachusetts prepare to address the issue of congestion when according to a report by research firm INRIX, its capital city wasted an average of 164 hours in traffic in 2018 (the highest in nation)? How much of the state’s $17.2 billion transportation capital budget will go towards these innovations, and how will public/private partnerships impact and shape the use of these taxpayer dollars? This context-specific lens will help to understand if/how these concerns translate to other places and mobility issues, and present the opportunity for dialogue around solutions being implemented, considered, or in need of policy-based or technological innovation.

MODERATOR Ceasar McDowell
PROFESSOR OF CIVIC DESIGN AND CO-CHAIR, MCP PROGRAM, MIT Urban Planning
Ceasar L. McDowell is Professor of the Practice of Civic Design at MIT. His current work is on the design of civic infrastructures and processes to connect the increasingly demographically complex public. Ceasar teaches on civic and community engagement and the use of social media to enhance both. Ceasar brings his deep commitment to the work of building beloved, just and equitable communities that can – as his friend Carl Moore says – ”struggle with the traditions that bind them and the interests that separate them so they can build a future that is an improvement on the past.”

Ceasar is the founder podcast series TheMove , MIT's CO-Lab and co-initiator of America’s Path Forward. Outside of MIT Ceasar firm Civic Designers LLC works with organizations ranging from Massport and the Kendal Square Association to, the Obama and W.K. Kellogg Foundations and Beyond Conflict on public participation, community engagement and civic leadership.

Dr. McDowell served as Director of the global civic engagement organization Dropping Knowledge International, President of Interaction Institute for Social Change, co-founder of The Civil Rights Forum on Telecommunications Policy, and founding Board member of The Algebra Project. Engagement Projects include GoBoston 2030, Springfield Northend Campaign, 21Days, Cambridge, MA and Global Table of Free Voice, Berlin.


Chris Dempsey
DIRECTOR, Transportation for Massachusetts
Chris Dempsey serves as Director of Transportation for Massachusetts, a diverse coalition of more than 70 member and partner organizations with a stake in improving transportation across the Commonwealth. Chris was formerly Assistant Secretary of Transportation for the Commonwealth. In that role, he co-founded the MBTA’s open-data program, which was named Innovation of the Year by WTS-Massachusetts in 2010. Chris has also worked as a consultant at Bain & Co., on a number of local and statewide political campaigns including that of Congressman Joe Kennedy III, and at a transportation technology startup that provides mobile ticketing for transit systems in New York, Boston, and Los Angeles. Chris is a graduate of Pomona College (B.A., 2005) and Harvard Business School (M.B.A, 2012). Chris has taught transportation policy at the graduate level at Northeastern University. In 2015, Chris was named Bostonian of the Year by the Boston Globe Magazine for his volunteer work leading No Boston Olympics. Chris is a lifelong transit rider who has never owned a car.


Chris Osgood
MAYOR WALSH'S CHIEF OF THE STREETS, TRANSPORTATION & SANITATION, City of Boston
Chris Osgood serves as Mayor Walsh's Chief of the Streets, Transportation & Sanitation. He works with the Public Works and Transportation Departments to deliver exceptional City services, build great streets, and implement a transportation plan that works for everyone.
Prior to serving in this role, Chris co- founded, in 2010, the Mayor's Office of New Urban Mechanics, a nationally replicated civic innovation group that experiments with new ways of using data, design and technology to improve the constituent experience.
Osgood joined the City in 2006, serving as a Mayoral Policy Advisor and working on the team that implemented the City's performance management program and rebuilt its 24-hour hotline. Chris is a graduate of City Year, Haverford College and the Harvard Business School.


Matthew Ciborowski
SENIOR PLANNER, Arup
Matthew Ciborowski is a Senior Planner in Arup’s Boston office with 10 years of experience in the public and private sectors. His work to date has focused on the Boston area through positions with the state department of transportation (MassDOT) and transit authority (MBTA), and he has worked across the United States in previous roles. He received both bachelor's and master's degrees from MIT's Department of Urban Studies and Planning.
Matthew’s experience includes service planning, alternatives analysis, economic development, environmental review, and the integration of engineering services. He has extensive project management experience, having managed multi-million-dollar planning studies and P3 efforts, most of which are now in the implementation phase.
Having advised a number of MassDOT Secretaries and MBTA General Managers as well as elected officials in Massachusetts, Matthew is well positioned to understand the interface between technical planning and political reality. His policy work for both MassDOT and the MBTA has progressed into investment strategy for both agencies.
As the leader of Arup’s Boston Planning practice, Matthew delivers projects for public and private sector clients that shape the future of our cities. His key areas of focus include fare and pricing policy, passenger facility design, transit micro-investments, the integration of emerging technologies into existing networks, the interface between planning and engineering, bridging the gap between government regimes, and P3 financing strategy.


Gretchen Effgen
VP OF GLOBAL PARTNERSHIPS, Aptiv Autonomous Mobility
Gretchen Effgen is VP of Global Partnerships for Aptiv Autonomous Mobility, where she leads the company’s go-to-market team in developing and executing the strategy and partnerships required to bring autonomous vehicles to market. A former Zipcar executive, Gretchen was responsible for the company’s strategic partnership initiatives, including those with Ford, Honda, Toyota. These partnerships were some of the earliest collaborations between the then-emerging mobility-as-a-service industry and established OEMs. She was awarded a specially-created Zipcar Innovator award in 2012. She serves on the Board of Directors of CivicSmart, a globally deployed V2X parking solutions provider, where she fulfilled an interim executive role on mobility services. Gretchen convened the Boston Mobility Roundtable in 2016, is a three-time appointee to the World Economic Forum’s Global Future Councils and served on the Commission on the Future of Transportation at the appointment of Massachusetts Governor Charlie Baker.


Rethinking Infrastructure for the Future of Mobility

Location: 6th Floor D5

New mobility technologies are revolutionizing the way people travel and the use of urban space. How should governments be thinking about integrating ridesharing, micromobilty, electric vehicles, and autonomous vehicles into the existing urban infrastructure network? How can private companies and governments work together to ensure the optimal roll-out of these technologies, especially given the large upfront cost and long lifespan of infrastructure investments? And when should all of this happen? This panel will explore all of the pertinent opportunities and challenges facing government and companies alike in the integration of new mobility technologies into urban infrastructure paying attention to access/equity, and the environmental impact of massive infrastructure investments.

MODERATOR Andrew Hawkins
TRANSPORTATION REPORTER, The Verge
Andrew is a senior transportation reporter at The Verge, where he covers self-driving cars, flying cars, ride-hailing services like Uber and Lyft, public transportation, infrastructure, electric scooters, the hyperloop, and anything that involves the physical act of moving through space and time. Prior to this, he wrote about politics at Crain's New York Business and the New York Daily News. He lives in Brooklyn with his wife, two kids, and many different brands of peanut butter.


Colin Murchie
SENIOR DIRECTOR OF BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT, UTILITIES AND PUBLIC PARTNERSHIPS, EVgo
Colin Murchie is the Senior Director of Business Development, Utilities and Public Partnerships for EVgo, the nation’s largest fast charging network for electric vehicles.
He brings more than 15 years of experience in the solar energy industry to his new role at EVgo, previously working at the intersection of infrastructure deployment, finance, and public policy. His prior roles span leadership roles during the exponential growth of real-world cleantech infrastructure deployment in the solar energy space, including State and Federal government affairs, business development and commercial sales/account management, and wholesale energy markets in the solar energy and cleantech space. His previous professional history includes positions with Sol Systems, SolarCity (now Tesla), SunEdison, and the Solar Energy Industries Association. He holds an MBA from the University of Maryland and a BS from Cornell University’s College of Agriculture and Life Sciences.


Melinda Hanson
SENIOR MANAGER FOR SUSTAINABILITY, Bird
Melinda Hanson joined Bird from the National Association of City Transportation Officials, where she served as deputy director of NACTO's international programs. Before that, Melinda was a consultant for the Asian Development Bank, helping design and implement public transit projects in Pakistan and the Philippines. Earlier in her career, she was a founding staff member of the ClimateWorks Foundation, where she oversaw the sustainable transport portfolio.


Willa Ng
DIRECTOR OF MOBILITY- STREETS, URBAN SYSTEMS, Sidewalk Labs
Willa Ng is Director of Mobility – Streets, Urban Systems at Sidewalk Labs. Her background is in transportation engineering and community engagement, with a focus on parking and transportation demand management.

At the City of Berkeley, Willa implemented a demand-responsive parking program, as well as transit and biking programs, under the city’s goBerkeley pilot. Willa previously worked at the New York City Department of Transportation managing the PARK Smart value-pricing program, the parking technology pilot program, two community-based transportation pilots, and the congestion pricing proposal environmental review.

Willa began as a transportation engineer at AECOM. She graduated from UC-Berkeley with an MS in transportation engineering and from MIT with BS degrees in civil engineering and management. She is a proud native New Yorker and recreational eater.


Nigel Jacob
CO-FOUNDER, City of Boston, Office of New Urban Mechanics
Nigel Jacob is the Co-founder of the Mayor’s Office of New Urban Mechanics, a civic innovation incubator and R&D Lab within Boston’s City Hall. Nigel’s work is about making urban life better via innovative, people-oriented applications of technology and design. Prior to joining the City of Boston in 2006, Nigel worked in a series of technology start-ups in the Boston area.
He was also previously the Urban Technologist in Residence at Living Cities, a philanthropic collaboration of 22 of the world’s largest foundations and financial institutions, is currently a board member at organizations such as Code For America and coUrbanize, and is an Executive-in-Residence at Boston University.
Nigel’s work has been written about extensively in magazines such as Wired, MIT Technology Review, Fast Company and books including The Responsive City, by Stephen Goldsmith and Susan Crawford and Smart Cities by Anthony Townsend.
This ground-breaking work has earned Nigel a number of awards including being named a Public Official of the year in 2011 by Governing Magazine, a Whitehouse Champion of Change and the Tribeca Disruptive Innovation award for 2012. Nigel is also a 12th level Wizard-Pirate with a special focus on causing chaos in large municipal bureaucracies via befuddlement spells.


Andrew Salzberg
HEAD OF TRANSPORTATION POLICY AND RESEARCH, Uber
As Uber’s Head of Transportation Policy and Research, Andrew focuses on making Uber an integral part of the future of urban transportation through research, partnerships, and policy development. He joined Uber in 2013 and became the Senior Operations Manager for New York City, Uber’s largest global market, before joining the global policy team. Prior to joining Uber, Andrew worked at the World Bank supporting public transportation investment projects in East Asia. He holds a bachelor of civil engineering degree from McGill University and Master in Urban Planning degree from Harvard University.


Lunch Showcase: MIT Mobility World

Location: 7th Floor Salon West

Just as the car replaced the horse-drawn carriage in a matter of decades, there are technologies out there that have the potential to totally upend our understanding of transportation today. This showcase will offer an opportunity for participants to interact with cutting edge technologies that have the potential to upend transportation as we know it today. Drones, AV bikes...no cars at all?

MIT Solve
HTTPS://SOLVE.MIT.EDU,
MIT Solve is a marketplace for social impact. We find tech entrepreneurs from around the world and broker partnerships across our community to scale their innovative work—driving lasting, transformational change.

Solve issues four Challenges each year to find the most promising Solver teams with solutions to the world's most pressing problems. Solve then deploys its global community of private, public, and nonprofit leaders to form the partnerships these Solver teams need to scale their impact.

In the last two years, Solve's cross-sector community has committed more than $7 million in funding to Solver teams, in addition to in-kind support such as mentorship, technical expertise, media and conference exposure, and business and entrepreneurship training.


City Science
HTTPS://WWW.MEDIA.MIT.EDU/PROJECTS/MOD/OVERVIEW/,
The PEV (Persuasive Electric Vehicle) provides an alternate option to private heavy machines, as an electric, shared robotic solution. We propose that new mobility systems must be explored to meet the profound challenges of the future and to enable dynamic and evolving places that respond to the complexities of life.


City Scanner
HTTP://SENSEABLE.MIT.EDU/CITYSCANNER/,
City Scanner proposes a drive-by solution to capture the spatiotemporal variation in environmental indicators in urban areas, such as air quality or the thermal flux of the built environment. Instead of deploying a dedicated fleet, we have deployed various types of environmental sensors on garbage trucks in the City of Cambridge.


Joro
HTTPS://JORO.TECH,
Joro is building an app and community that makes it easy to automatically track and improve your carbon footprint.


MIT Sustainable Logistics Initiative
HTTP://SUSTAINABLELOGISTICS.MIT.EDU/,
[1] The “Green home delivery consolidation” focuses on testing the environmental effects of extending time delivery window from 1-2 to 4-5 days via the transportation consolidation of home deliveries.

[2] The “Topography routing problem” project focuses on analyzing, how to improve routing transportation decisions?, What is the effect of topography in routing decisions? and when solutions affected by topography affect the distance-min route


MIT Hyperloop II
HTTPS://WWW.MITHYPERLOOP.MIT.EDU/,
The MIT Hyperloop Team is designing and building a prototype to compete in Space X’s annual Hyperloop Pod Competition (July 2019). The pod design competition is intended to increase participation and promote innovation in what will undoubtedly be a monumental engineering challenge. The ultimate vision of the Hyperloop is to have transport pods glide >800mph through a partially vacuumed tube. Hyperloop has the potential to transform personal and freight transportation as we know it.

The MIT team is excited to be a part of this competition and aspires to help make the Hyperloop dream a reality. Alongside mentorship from renowned MIT professors, our team brings together significant depts in knowledge and experience. Through cross disciplinary collaboration across mechanical engineering, systems engineering, structural engineering, and business, we hope to showcase MIT’s engineering caliber and truly make an impact in the frontier of transportation.


The Okoa Project
HTTP://THEOKOAPROJECT.COM,
The Okoa Project is a nonprofit dedicated to developing creative technologies to increase access to healthcare in these communities. We are a group of MIT engineers who are working in collaboration with Tanzanian innovation centers and community leaders, to achieve this goal. Over the past 3 years we have developed a motorcycle ambulance trailer that can transport a patient, medical supplies and one other person. Our locally made trailer can attach to any motorcycle and be integrated into existing taxi norms, making it a realistic and affordable solution.


Lunch Keynote: The Geography of Innovation

Location: 7th Floor MIT

Introducing sustainability into the future of mobility is far from a one-size-fits-all challenge. Different countries—and different communities—have different transportation needs and different societal end goals. Reynold D'Silva from Go-Jek, Indonesia’s unicorn TNC (Transportation Network Company), will dive into the subject of geographic differences in the realm of sustainable mobility. He will discuss the rise of the company, its structure, and different needs and demand that they have found in different markets.

Reynold D'Silva
SENIOR VICE PRESIDENT, HEAD OF DATA MARKETING INNOVATION, Go-Jek
Reynold is Senior Vice President at Go-Jek, which has combined smartphone-based technology and motorcycles to provide people with traffic-beating rides, piping-hot food delivery, electronic payments online and offline, in-home beauty treatments and many other life-enhancing conveniences. He heads Data Monetization, Marketing Solutions and Brand Partnerships, working with a team of product marketers, data scientists and developers to create marketing tools and solutions that help our brand partners to grow.

In previous roles, Reynold learned how to create cocktails and design dining experiences at the Taj Group of Hotels, managed sales and shopper activation for Modern Trade at Hindustan Lever, developed brands, products, advertising and digital innovation in Home & Personal Care at Unilever and led sales and marketing for Brands and E-Commerce at Facebook APAC.


Sustainable Mobility: The Challenge of Balancing Innovation with Social and Economic Equity

Location: 6th Floor D3& D4

As technological innovation makes seismic waves in mobility, not everyone benefits equally. Thus, there is a growing need for the private and public sectors to collaborate and ensure that gains are shared. These two sectors will need to find ways of aligning incentives in order to effectively manage major socio-economic challenges including: transportation access, improving social inclusion, creating jobs, and reducing vehicle congestion. This panel dives into current equity challenges within the mobility landscape and explores how the public and private sectors can work together to address them.

MODERATOR Zeninjor Enwemeka
REPORTER, WBUR
Zeninjor Enwemeka is a reporter at WBUR, Boston's NPR station, where she covers news both online and on air. She reports on business, tech and culture as part of WBUR's Bostonomix team, which focuses on the innovation economy. Before joining WBUR, she worked at The Boston Globe as a breaking news writer for Boston.com. She also spent several years as a news/homepage producer for the website. Zeninjor was part of the 2014 Pulitzer Prize-winning team for The Boston Globe's breaking news coverage of the Boston Marathon bombings.

She was also an adjunct lecturer at Boston University, where she taught a class on multimedia and online journalism. Zeninjor is a graduate of the Medill School of Journalism at Northwestern University. She serves as the
secretary of the Boston Association of Black Journalists.


Paul Healy
JD CANDIDATE AT YALE LAW, CONTRIBUTOR TO OXFORD URBANISTS, Oxford Urbanists
Paul Healy is a student at Yale Law School, where he focuses on the relationship between law and economic development. He also holds a master’s degree in development economics from Oxford University, where he focused on the spatial components of development—for instance, his dissertation evaluated the effect of a national highway project on crop markets in India. He also contributed to the Oxford Urbanists, including writing several articles about mobility. Prior to graduate school, Paul was a consultant at McKinsey & Co., where he worked with transit agencies, city and state governments, and investors on mobility and infrastructure projects. He also did a brief stint at a mobility tech startup in South Africa called WhereIsMyTransport, supporting the company’s social impact team and preparing for future fundraising rounds.


Ammar Malik
ASSOCIATE DIRECTOR OF RESEARCH, Evidence for Policy Design at the Harvard Kennedy School
Ammar A. Malik is the Associate Director of Research at Evidence for Policy Design at the Harvard Kennedy School. Ammar’s research focuses on spatial urban forms and their economic implications, the political economy of public service delivery, and the distributional effects of urban public transport. For his work on the economic impact of sexual harassment in urban public spaces, he was awarded the World Bank Group and Sexual Violence Research Initiative’s 2017 Development Marketplace Innovation Award.

Before joining EPoD, Ammar was a Senior Research Associate at the Urban Institute in Washington D.C. He has also previously worked at the World Bank, International Food Policy Research Institute, Pakistan’s National Disaster Management Authority and Standard Chartered Bank.

Ammar holds a Ph.D. in Public Policy from George Mason University, MA in Public Affairs from Institut d’Etudes Politiques (Sciences Po) Paris, MA in Public Policy from the National University of Singapore, and BA in Economics and Mathematics from the Lahore University of Management Sciences.


Kathryn Carlson
DIRECTOR OF TRANSPORTATION, A Better City
Kathryn Carlson joined A Better City in August 2017 as the Director of Transportation. In this role, she directs the transportation research and policy agendas for the organization as well as oversees the two Transportation Management Associations (TMAs).

Prior to joining A Better City, Kathryn founded Buca Boot LLC, a bicycle product company and invented their flagship product, the Buca Boot, a patented bike-mounted storage system that won Inc. Magazine’s “Best In Class” Design Award in 2015.

Previously, her professional experiences encompass research and policy positions. She spent eight years as a research analyst and economist at Fidelity Investments in Boston covering energy and commodity markets. From 2003-2005, Kathryn served in the Administration of Wisconsin Governor Jim Doyle as a senior-level appointee at the Department of Financial Institutions – the state banking and securities regulator where she managed all legislative, policy and communications functions of the department.

She is a board member of the LivableStreets Alliance in Boston and holds both Bachelors of Arts and Masters of Science degrees in Economics from Wellesley College and the London School of Economics, respectively.


Joël Hazan
HEAD OF "FUTURE OF MOBILITY", BCG
Joël Hazan is a core member of the Consumer, and the Marketing, Sales & Pricing practices of The Boston Consulting Group. Joël is also a BCG Henderson Institute fellow, exploring the future of mobility. Since joining BCG in 2005, Joël has advised several global leading consumer products, luxury, and transportation and mobility players. Joël launched and piloted Mobility Nation, a unique initiative that brought together public and private, startups and research institutes around the definition of a vision for Mobility in 2030 in the Paris region. Additionally, Joël leads BCG’s work in railways around the world. On this topic, he has deep experience in strategy, network optimization, marketing, and operations.


People and Goods Transportation: Tech Synergies for Lasting Sustainability?

Location: 6th Floor D5

Within cities, people and goods have traditionally travelled on different vehicles and had different origins and destinations. Yet, today e-commerce is changing customer behavior and urban logistics patterns, increasing the number of last mile vehicles while complexifying urban logistics operations. With the aim of rendering cities more livable, reducing vehicle miles traveled, and allowing for sustainable urban transportation, could goods and people transportation exploit their once siloed technologies/industries to learn from one another and explore potential synergies?

MODERATOR Brooke McKenna
DEPARTMENT OF TRAFFIC, PARKING & TRANSPORTATION, CAMBRIDGE, MA, Assistant Director for Street Management
Brooke McKenna is the Assistant Director for Street Management with the Department of Traffic, Parking & Transportation in Cambridge, MA. In this role, Brooke is responsible for overseeing the safe operation of Cambridge’s street network and leading the City’s Vision Zero Initiative. Brooke previously spent ten years with the New York City Department of Transportation.


Josué Velázquez-Martínez
DIRECTOR OF MIT CTL SUSTAINABLE LOGISTICS INITIATIVE, MIT CTL
Josué C. Velázquez Martínez is a Research Scientist at the MIT Center for Transportation and Logistics specialized in Logistics and Supply Chain Management in manufacturing, food, and retail industries, and has vast experience in conducting applied research on Sustainable Logistics in emerging markets. Dr. Velázquez Martínez leads two research streamlines: the MIT Sustainable Logistics Initiative, which involves research projects on green logistics sponsored by multinational companies, with the purpose of improving fuel consumption and CO2 emissions in logistics operations, and the MIT GeneSys, which aims to improve the efficiency of small firms, and involves on-site research at approximately 200 small enterprises across Latin America in collaboration with the region’s top universities. Dr. Velázquez Martínez also serves as the Executive Director of the MIT Supply Chain Management Blended Program, an elite program that allows learners to combine the MITx MicroMasters credential with one+ semester at MIT. As a part of his teaching activities, Dr. Velázquez Martínez is a frequent lecturer in the Executive Education courses at the center, and he is also the lead instructor of the graduate course SCM.290 Sustainable Supply Chain Management at MIT.


Omar Hoda
PRINCIPAL, Deloitte
Omar Hoda is a principal at Deloitte who serves transportation and automotive clients. As part of the Deloitte’s strategy practice, Monitor-Deloitte, he focuses in the areas of corporate and business unit strategy, innovation, marketing and commercial strategy.
Over the past several years he has served as the Transportation and Automotive Lead for Deloitte’s Future of Mobility Initiative – which focuses on the cross-industry disruption that is occurring as a result of autonomous technologies and the sharing economy. Prior to his focus on the auto and transportation sectors he served clients in the technology, media and telecommunications sector advising them around the disruption driven by internet technologies and the information economy.
Mr. Hoda, began his career as an engineer and entrepreneur with a number of enterprise software and telecommunications equipment manufacturers. Mr. Hoda holds a Bachelor’s and Master’s Degree in Computer Science from the University of Massachusetts and Boston University respectively, as well as a MBA from Babson College. He lives in the suburbs of Boston with his wife and two daughters.


Patrick Browne
DIRECTOR OF GLOBAL SUSTAINABILITY, UPS
Patrick Browne serves as Director of Global Sustainability for UPS, a worldwide leader in supply chain and logistics solutions. Working with cross-functional teams and executive leadership, Patrick leads strategies and initiatives to advance the company’s long-term sustainability vision.

Patrick has managed UPS’s sustainability programs since 2008, including overseeing the company’s global GHG inventory and reporting, and has held various assignments in Plant Engineering and Environmental Affairs during his 30-year tenure with UPS.

Patrick is an active participant in organizations focused on advancing sustainable business practices around the world, including BSR’s Future of Fuels working group and Global Reporting Initiative’s GOLD Community.


William Chernicoff
SENIOR MANAGER, Global Research & Innovation Toyota Mobility Foundation
Dr. Chernicoff currently serves as the Senior Manager of Global Research and Innovation for the Toyota Mobility Foundation. He defines and coordinates the foundation’s research agenda, initiatives, programs, and provides technology guidance to projects. With both near- and long-term perspectives, Dr. Chernicoff helps conceive, identify, and execute new technology approaches that enable and improve the solutions implemented by the foundation and its partners. He brings a strong background across energy, technology, mobility, and climate policy from his prior work as a Manager and Principle Researcher with Toyota North America’s Energy & Environmental Research Group and his eight years with the US DOT’s Research Administration.
Dr. Chernicoff earned a Bachelor of Science in Materials Science and Engineering at M.I.T., a Master of Science in Manufacturing Engineering from Boston University, and a Ph.D. in Systems Engineering and Engineering Management at the George Washington University.


Plenary Panel: The Future of Mobility- Who Should be Responsible for Which Investment and Where?

Location: 7th Floor MIT

Far from the old car/public transportation dichotomy, mobility today is a cluttered field featuring all kinds of services, apps and systems. Public transit is suddenly just one of many options to get from Point A to Point B, accompanied by TNC (Transportation Network Company) rides, scooters, shared bikes and everything in between. This, in turn, has sparked rumblings that mobility might be moving in the direction of being a service rather than a public good. If so, who is responsible for investing in this new tech that has the potential to drastically affect the lives of citizens? Should governments offer incentives for businesses to ensure that their innovations are sustainable? How can public private partnerships offer more tailored solutions? What legacy mobility items need to be preserved and what can we look to the future to solve? The questions are endless. This panel promises to solve them all.

MODERATOR Molly Turner
PROFESSOR, UC Berkeley
Molly Turner is an urban innovation pioneer and a leading expert on technology startups and cities. Through her teaching at Haas and her work in the field, she has shaped the contemporary conversation about technology’s impacts on urban life and governance. At Haas, Turner teaches the popular class Tech and the City: How to Get Urban Innovation Right to graduate MBAs. She is also the co-host and co-producer of the podcast Technopolis from Atlantic Media and CityLab. Turner is deeply engaged in contemporary tech and urban policy issues through her advisory role with civic tech startups, and board membership of urban policy think tank SPUR.

Turner was an early employee of Airbnb, where she established the company’s public policy team in 2011 and directed its groundbreaking regulatory collaboration with cities. As the Global Head of Civic Partnerships, Turner directed Airbnb’s partnerships with governments around the world, including its international disaster response program, neighborhood tourism development program, and 2015 launch in Cuba. Before Airbnb, Turner worked for the San Francisco Mayor’s Office of Economic Development, the UNESCO World Heritage Cities Program, and an urban planning consulting firm. Turner holds a Master in Urban Planning from Harvard University and a BA from Dartmouth College.


Marc Klein
VICE PRESIDENT OF DATA AND DIGITAL ADVOCACY SOLUTIONS, Majority Strategies LLC
Marc Klein is the Vice President of Data and Digital Advocacy Solutions at Majority Strategies LLC. With over 20 years of experience, Majority Strategies offers a wide range of specialized product solutions focused on awareness, persuasion and activation of voters, constituents, consumers, elected officials, and membership organizations through analytical targeting, data-driven messaging, and omni-channel voter contact, including digital, mobile, and print advertising.

Most recently, Mr. Klein was the Vice President of Microtransit Government Partnerships at Chariot Transit, Inc., which is owned by Ford Smart Mobility LLC, and he focused on improving Sustainability, Accessibility, and Automobility options for the residents and visitors of cities across America. Mr. Klein is a member of the Chairman’s Council at Bette Midler’s “New York Restoration Project” and is on the Executive Advisory Board at Techweek. Mr. Klein was Vice President of National Accounts and Airports at Clean Energy Fuels Corp., which is the largest provider of natural gas fuel for fleets in North America.

Mr. Klein is a Co-Founder of The Vehicle Production Group which manufactured the MV-1, the first factory-direct vehicle that meets the vehicle guidelines of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) and runs on clean-burning natural gas. More than 500 MV-1’s operate today in New York City as part of the MTA's Access-A-Ride paratransit fleet. In 2011, Mr. Klein was selected by the White House as a “Champion of Change” in the fields of sustainability and accessibility. Mr. Klein also served as President and CEO of the London Fleet Companies that acquired the North American distribution, sales, and advertising rights for the world-famous London Taxi (U.S. left-hand drive model). By trade, Mr. Klein is a commercial business lawyer who represented commercial banks and finance companies and he is admitted to practice law in New York and Connecticut.


Clara Brenner
CO-FOUNDER AND MANAGING PARTNER, Urban Innovation Fund
Clara is co-founder and Managing Partner of the Urban Innovation Fund, a venture capital firm that invests in the future of cities. The fund provides seed capital and regulatory support to entrepreneurs solving our toughest urban challenges – helping them grow into tomorrow’s most valued companies.
Previously, she co-founded Tumml, a startup hub for urban tech. The organization has provided 38 startups with seed funding and mentorship, and hosts thought leadership events around urban innovation. In 2014, Forbes listed her as one of its “30 Under 30” for Social Entrepreneurship. Clara’s work energizing urban entrepreneurship has been featured in numerous press outlets, including MSNBC and TechCrunch, among others. She serves on the Board of Tumml, as well as the Local Initiatives Support Corporation (LISC) Bay Area Local Advisory Committee. Clara earned her MBA from MIT Sloan and BA from NYU.


Rich Davey
ASSOCIATE DIRECTOR, BCG
Rich is an Associate Director at the Boston Consulting Group’s New York office working with the Public Sector practice areas, and leads BCG’s State and Local Public Sector Practice. Since joining BCG, Rich has advised public transportation and transit systems, railroads, highway operators and private transportation firms across a wide variety of topics.

Prior to joining BCG, Rich had a 15 years of C-suite experience in high profile, publicly accountable organizations in state government and the private sector. Rich served as the Secretary and Chief Executive Officer of the Massachusetts Department of Transportation (“MassDOT”) from September 2011 until October 2014. Under Rich’s leadership, MassDOT was credited with implementing reforms that improved customer service and saved taxpayer money, pushed for accelerated construction procurement and techniques that improved on-time and on-budget metrics, championed P3s, and used innovation and technology to improve service delivery. Rich was also credited with steadily guiding MassDOT through numerous crises, including two historic blizzards and the Boston Marathon bombings.

Prior to serving as Secretary, Rich served as the General Manager of the Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority (“MBTA”) the 5th largest public transit system in the United States. Rich was able to effectively manage the MBTA during time of fiscal challenges by achieving both a balanced budget and the highest annual ridership since 1946. And just prior to joining BCG, Rich served as the CEO of Boston 2024, the organization that sought to bring the 2024 Summer Olympic and Paralympic Games to Boston.

He is a graduate of the College of the Holy Cross in Worcester, MA and holds a juris doctorate, summa cum laude,from Gonzaga University School of Law in Spokane, WA and live in the Back Bay with his wife, Jane Willis.


Seleta Reynolds
GENERAL MANAGER, Los Angeles Department of Transportation
Seleta Reynolds is General Manager of the Los Angeles Department of Transportation (LADOT) appointed by the Administration of Mayor Eric Garcetti. Ms. Reynolds is responsible for implementing Great Streets for
Los Angeles, a plan to reduce traffic fatalities, double the number of people riding bikes, and expand access to integrated transportation choices for Angelenos and the region.
Ms. Reynolds has over 20 years of transportation experience throughout the United States. She has advised transportation technology companies like WalkScore, contributed to the state-of-the-practice as an Association of Pedestrian and Bicycle Professionals Board Member, mentored young professionals through Women’s Transportation Seminar, and nurtured research on Transportation Research Board committees. Ms. Reynolds serves as the President of the National Association for City Transportation Officials.


Closing Keynote: Innovation and Turmoil in the Transportation Sector- Where Can it Take Us?

Location: 7th Floor MIT

As we will see throughout the day, ongoing innovation in the transportation sector is offering unheard of opportunities for growth and progress both in cities and beyond. Yet innovation is invariably connected to turmoil—and the challenge of the new: how to adopt policies and build a new regulatory structure around innovation so that it can be properly harnessed and work towards desirable end goals? And do we even know what those desirable end goals are? What kind of future and what kinds of cities do we really want to build? Robin Chase, co-founder and former CEO of Zipcar, will dive into the pressing questions raised throughout the day’s conference, offering insights into how best to chart a path forward.

Robin Chase
CO-FOUNDER AND FORMER CEO, Zipcar
Robin Chase is a transportation entrepreneur. She is co-founder and former CEO of Zipcar, the largest car-sharing company in the world; as well as co-founder of Veniam, a network company that moves terabytes of data between vehicles and the cloud. Her recent book is Peers Inc: How People and Platforms are Inventing the Collaborative Economy and Reinventing Capitalism. Her current passion is working with cities to maximize the transformation possible with the introduction of self driving cars.

She sits on the Boards of the World Resources Institute and Tucows, and serves on the Dutch multinational DSM’s Sustainability Advisory Board. In the past, she has served on the boards of Veniam and the Massachusetts Department of Transportation, the French National Digital Agency, the National Advisory Council for Innovation & Entrepreneurship for the US Department of Commerce, the Intelligent Transportations Systems Program Advisory Committee for the US Department of Transportation, the OECD’s International Transport Forum Advisory Board, the Massachusetts Governor’s Transportation Transition Working Group, and Boston Mayor’s Wireless Task Force.


Closing Remarks

Location: 7th Floor MIT

Jason Jay
SENIOR LECTURER AND DIRECTOR, SUSTAINABILITY INITIATIVE, MIT Sloan School of Management
Jason Jay is a Senior Lecturer at the MIT Sloan School of Management and Director of the Sustainability Initiative at MIT Sloan. His research focuses on how people navigate the tensions between personal, business, and social goals in sustainability efforts. His first book is Breaking Through Gridlock: The Power of Conversation in a Polarized World and he has published articles in the Academy of Management Journal and California Management Review. He teaches courses on strategy, innovation, and leadership for sustainable business at MIT, and engages students and alumni in hands-on projects with leading companies and organizations. Prior to MIT, Jason was a management consultant for Dialogos International, where he consulted on leadership development and organizational change for major international corporations and NGO's including BP and the World Bank. Jason holds a Ph.D. in Organization Studies from the MIT Sloan School of Management, and an AB and M.Ed from Harvard University. He lives in Newton, Massachusetts.


Reception

Location: 7th Floor Salon West

Join us for a networking reception after the event!