Program

Below is the program from the 2018 MIT Sustainability Summit.

Friday 9 March 2018
8:00 AM
Registration / Breakfast
9:00 AM
Welcome & Opening Remarks
9:20 AM
Opening Keynote
10:00 AM
Interactive
10:25 AM
Founding Your Company on Good Jobs: A fireside chat with Managed by Q
Managed by Q is an office management company founded in 2014 to support office operations, including cleaning, maintenance, administration, IT, security, and supplies. From the beginning, Managed by Q was committed to implementing "The Good Jobs Strategy" by hiring and empowering their workers (or "operators"). In this panel, we will explore the decision by Managed by Q to employ their Operators instead of using a gig economy model. Aamir will discuss the origin story of Managed by Q, what makes the company's model successful, and what challenges his team faces running the operational day to day of Q Services (the company's in-house office management division).
Aamir Sarwar
VP Services, Managed by Q
Aamir Sarwar leads Managed by Q's service company, Q Services. He manages over 700 people who provide thousands of companies with office services, including market-leading cleaning, porter, maintenance, and administrative support. He applies the good jobs strategy to Q Services' operational decisions, and recently the business unit became nationally profitable. Aamir was one of Managed by Q's first employees, and built out its first mature business in office cleaning. Prior to Q, Aamir worked as a consultant at Oliver Wyman, where he worked with the firm's telecoms and technology clients to identify operational cost efficiencies and improve customer satisfaction and retention. Aamir attended Northwestern University and majored in Economics and Political Science.
10:25 AM
PANEL: Employee Training: Evolving Skills in a Fast-Changing Environment
In the face of a rapidly evolving labor landscape, matching workers with demand can sometimes feel like chasing a moving target. This panel will discuss innovative solutions to support employee training, including internal and industry-wide perspectives. The panel includes speakers from private and public sectors to analyze what's worked, what hasn't, and how to move forward.
Francisco Rodriguez
Manager, Integrated Robotics, DeLaval North America
Born and raised as a farmer in the beautiful mountains of Colombia.
Grown as a dairy entrepreneur.
Educated as a Doctor of Veterinary Medicine and Strategic Marketing Specialist.
Today, positioned as a global robotic farming consultant and Robotics business manager for DeLaval North America.
Francisco has been involved in the development and management of robotic dairies in North America, Latin America, Europe and Oceania. Author of multiple articles and blogs. Francisco and his wife Sofia reside in Chicago, IL where they enjoy the mix of Midwest farming and downtown living!
10:25 AM
PANEL: Data and Measurement: Data As a Tool For Becoming a High-Road Employer
How does data collection and subsequent reporting affect a company's motivation to provide good jobs (be a high-road employer)? What are the business implications of gathering data and reporting on it to external stakeholders?
Alison Omens
Director Corporate Engagement, Just Capital
Tom Woelfel
Director InSight, Pacific Community Ventures
Amanda Kizer
Analytics Associate, B-Lab
Clara Brenner
Managing Partner, Urban Innovation Fund
11:25 AM
PANEL: Spotlight on Good Jobs in Retail & Hospitality
The retail and hospitality sectors employ an increasingly high percentage of the American workforce, and companies in these industries have mixed track records with regards to the quality of jobs provided. Some retail and hospitality companies have recognized the fundamental link between empowering their employees and providing high levels of service to the customers in their stores, restaurants, and hotels. In this panel, we will hear from executives and employees from companies that have been leaders in viewing their customer-facing employees as assets to be empowered, not costs to be minimized. We will hear their different approaches to empowering employees, the success these policies have achieved, and the challenges of implementing large-scale change to employee policies.
Katie Bach
Director Global Strategy, Starbucks
Katie is a Director of Global Strategy at Starbucks, where she leads the development of the company’s
annual strategic plan and consults on a range of strategic initiatives, including Starbucks go-to- market
approach. Prior to joining Starbucks, Katie spent two years on the leadership team of a financial advisory
and management consulting firm in Kenya, where she worked with retail and other companies on
strategic and talent-focused issues; before that, Katie was at McKinsey, where she focused on strategy,
innovation, and social sector consulting. Katie has an M.B.A. from MIT Sloan, where she was a Siebel
Scholar, a Master’s Degree from the London School of Economics, and a B.A. from Oxford University.
She currently lives in Seattle with her husband and the dog that they adopted in Nairobi.
Todd Miner
Meat Manager, Costco
Catriona Eldemary
Sr Director of Human Resources, Four Seasons
Catriona joined the Four Seasons Hotel Boston in 19 89 as a server in the Bristol Lounge. She worked in several positions in Food and Beverage, worked her way up through the Rooms Division ending with Director of Housekeeping. She then moved Human Resources as Assistant Director. In 1919 she transferred to Four Seasons London as their Director of Human Resources. In 2003, she made her way back to Four Seasons Boston as Director of Human Resources.

Pre-Four Seasons, Catriona worked for Aer Lingus Hotels in London, In 1987 she moved to the United States and joined Omni Hotels in Boston as a management trainee and was promoted to Purchasing Manager.

Catriona graduated from a hotel college in Ireland in 1986.
MODERATOR Jason Jay
Senior Lecturer and Director, SUSTAINABILITY INITIATIVE, MIT Sloan School of Management
Jason Jay is a Senior Lecturer at the MIT Sloan School of Management and Director of the Sustainability Initiative at MIT Sloan. His research focuses on how people navigate the tensions between personal, business, and social goals in sustainability efforts. His first book is Breaking Through Gridlock: The Power of Conversation in a Polarized World and he has published articles in the Academy of Management Journal and California Management Review. He teaches courses on strategy, innovation, and leadership for sustainable business at MIT, and engages students and alumni in hands-on projects with leading companies and organizations. Prior to MIT, Jason was a management consultant for Dialogos International, where he consulted on leadership development and organizational change for major international corporations and NGO's including BP and the World Bank. Jason holds a Ph.D. in Organization Studies from the MIT Sloan School of Management, and an AB and M.Ed from Harvard University. He lives in Newton, Massachusetts.
11:25 AM
PANEL: The Business Case for Inclusive Hiring: Connecting People with Barriers to Employment to Quality Jobs
While the unemployment rate has remained low in recent years, quality jobs continue to be out of reach for many Americans who face barriers to employment, including opportunity youth and formerly incarcerated individuals. Through this panel, we will hear from companies that have successfully attracted, retained, and developed people with barriers to work. Panelists will discuss the business and social value generated through inclusive hiring strategies, providing the audience with practical tools to recruit and develop these untapped talent pools.
Mike Brady
CEO, Greyston Bakery
As CEO and President of Greyston since 2012, Mike has continued to build on the company’s 35‐year heritage as a pioneering social enterprise. Greyston Bakery is best known for manufacturing brownies that go into the Ben & Jerry’s Chocolate Fudge Brownie ice cream and for its practice of Open Hiring™, which embraces an individual’s potential by providing employment opportunities regardless of background or work history. Greyston has since become the first registered Beneβit Corporation in New York State, running a profitable business that supports the most economically disadvantages residents of the community.

Mike led Greyston Bakery as President for four years, driving strategic business development to 100% revenue growth with long‐standing partner Ben & Jerry’s, along with new partners such as Whole Foods Market. Recently, Mike took responsibility for all Greyston programs and businesses such as Workforce Development, Community Gardens, Housing and Health Services and the Greyston Early Learning Center.

Prior to joining Greyston, Mike was a partner with BAO Food and Drink, where he oversaw the development of the first incubator in the country dedicated to organic food production and distribution. He has more than 20 years of experience in strategy and management, identifying business opportunities in high‐growth and transitional industries. Mike serves as a business advisor to the American Sustainable Business Council (ASBC) and Social Enterprise Alliance (SEA) helping to promote policies for a sustainable economy.

Mike earned an M.B.A. from the University of Pennsylvania—the Wharton School.

Mike grew up in Rochester, New York and now lives outside of New York City with his wife and two sons.
MODERATOR Nicole Trimble
Executive Director Impact Hiring, FSG
As the Executive Director of the Impact Hiring Initiative, Nicole leads a community of pioneering employers and workforce partners interested in innovating best practices in hiring, retention, and advancement of Opportunity Youth and other populations facing barriers to employment.

Prior to joining the initiative, Nicole designed and led global Citizenship, Sustainability & Community Affairs strategies and was on the Human Resources Leadership Team at Outerwall, the company behind Redbox, Coinstar, and ecoATM. Previously she was a Program Officer at the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, advised foundation and corporate clients at Philanthropy Northwest, held several positions leading national service initiatives, and was named a White House Champion of Change.
11:25 AM
Interactive TBD
12:15 PM
Lunch
12:40 PM
Keynote Speaker
David Rolf
President, SEIU Seattle Chapter
David Rolf is known internationally as an innovative labor leader and thinker on the future of work and labor. Rolf was a leading architect of the historic fights to win a $15 living wage in SeaTac and Seattle, WA. He serves as an International Vice President of the Service Employees International Union (SEIU) and as President of SEIU 775, which represents more than 45,000 long-term care workers in the Pacific Northwest.

Rolf’s has been called “the most successful union organizer of the last 15 years” by The American Prospect, which said that “No American unionist has organized as many workers, or won them raises as substantial, as Rolf.”
Rolf writes and speaks frequently about alternative futures for U.S. worker movements, and is the author of the forthcoming book Fight for Fifteen: The Right Wage for a Working America (New Press, 2016). He has been published in The American Prospect, The Nation, Aspen Journal of Ideas, Social Policy, and Spotlight on Poverty.

Rolf is building a new labor movement, founding organizations like the Fair Work Center, Working Washington, and The Workers Lab. The Fair Work Center is a Seattle-based hub for workers to understand and exercise their legal rights, and also assists in enforcing labor law. Working Washington is a statewide organization fighting for economic justice and workers’ rights in Washington State. The California-based Workers Lab invests in projects that will create the next generation’s labor movement, building economic power for working people at a large scale while developing self-sufficient organizational revenue models.

Rolf is also the founder and board chair of the SEIU 775 Benefits Group, which provides training, health care and retirement benefits to Washington State’s home care workers. The Benefits Group is the largest long-term care workforce development organization in the country and the only organization providing Advanced Registered Apprenticeship training for home care workers. In addition to building career pathways for caregivers, the Benefits Group provides affordable, comprehensive health benefits and the nation’s first pension fund for home care workers.

Born and raised in Cincinnati, OH, Rolf graduated from Bard College and joined SEIU as an organizer in 1991. He lives with his wife in Seattle.
1:20 PM
Lunch Interactive
Tom Kochan
George Maverick Bunker Professor of Management; Professor, Work and Organization Studies, MIT Sloan School of Management
1:45 PM
PANEL: The Case for a Living Wage: What Does it Look Like and How Do We Get There?
After a brief orientation and overview on the meaning of a Living Wage, this panel will showcase a diverse set of actors and their experiences pursuing or advocating for a Living Wage, within the primary context of the United States labor market. From their own perspective, panelists will discuss the motivation, opportunities, and strategies involved in paying a Living Wage, as well as the deep-seated challenges and their vision for moving forward.
Peter MacKinnon
President, SEIU Local 509
1:45 PM
PANEL: Worker Voice in the 21st Century: How Workers & Business Can Co-Create Value
Explore how new forms of organizing are transforming business from the outside. Discuss new tactics for organizing, what works / what hasn’t, what’s changed about organizing, and how technology is changing the way workers (and other stakeholders) organize and make change. Attendees will come away with a better understanding of how workers can engage employers and other stakeholders effectively.
Abhi Adhikari
Founder, Workership
Brian Lang
President, UNITE HERE, Local 26 Union
1:45 PM
PANEL: Success Story: Activists and Businesses Raising the Standards for Agricultural Workers
Described as one of the “most important social-impact success stories of the past century” by the Harvard Business Review, this fireside chat will focus on the Fair Food Program, forged by the Coalition of Immokalee Workers in partnership with companies such as Whole Foods Market, Walmart, Yum Brands, and many more. In this panel, an activist and agricultural worker will be in conversation with a VP from Compass Group to discuss the challenges and opportunities in improving labor standards for agricultural workers.
Gerardo Reyes-Chavez
Leader and Organizer and Former Farmworker, Coalition of Immokalee Workers
GERARDO REYES CHAVEZ is a key leader of the Coalition of Immokalee Workers (CIW). Mr. Reyes is a farmworker himself and has worked in the fields since age 11, first as a peasant farmer in Zacatecas, Mexico and then in the fields of Florida picking oranges, tomatoes, blueberries, and watermelon. Mr. Reyes has worked closely with consumer allies to organize national actions -- renowned for their creativity and effectiveness -- designed to bring pressure on the large retail purchasers of Florida produce to join the Fair Food Program. He speaks publicly about the Fair Food Program at events across the country, such as the Harvard Law School Labor and Worklife Program Convening on Farm Labor Challenges and the Interfaith Council on Corporate Responsibility’s Multi-stakeholder Roundtable on Ethical Recruitment. As part of the implementation of the Fair Food Program, Mr. Reyes and his colleagues conduct workers’ rights education in the fields on all farms participating in the program. Mr. Reyes also receives complaints of abuses in the fields, manages wage theft claims, and assists in the investigation of cases of modern-day slavery when they arise.
Cheryl Queen
VP Communications & Corporate Affairs, Compass Group
MODERATOR Carmen Rojas
CEO, The Workers Lab
Carmen Rojas is the CEO of The Workers Lab, guides The Workers Lab to invest in entrepreneurs, community organizers, technologists, economic justice organizations, issue campaigns, and businesses to create scalable and self-sustaining solutions that improve conditions for low-wage workers. Under Carmen’s leadership and vision, The Workers Lab focuses on ideas, services, and products that will achieve sufficient scale to impact workers across sectors, industries, and geographies, and result in self-sufficient revenue models.

Previously, Carmen was the Acting Director of Collective Impact at Living Cities. In this capacity, she played a pivotal role supporting the work of Living Cities’ member institutions, which represented 22 of the largest foundations and financial institutions in the world. Her work focused on improving economic opportunity for low income people by supporting projects in the fields of economic and workforce development, energy efficiency, and asset building. From 2008 to 2011, Carmen was the Director of Strategic Programs at the Mitchell Kapor Foundation, where she oversaw the Foundation’s Green Access and Civic Engagement programs. Her charge involved participating in efforts to build power in low income communities and communities of color. Prior to joining the Kapor Foundation, Carmen was the Coordinator of the San Francisco Redevelopment Agency’s Taskforce on African American OutMigration. As Coordinator, she developed qualitative and quantitative reports for a taskforce established by San Francisco’s Mayor Gavin Newsom to address African American displacement from the city.

Carmen holds a Ph.D. in City and Regional Planning from the University of California, Berkeley and was a Fulbright Scholar in 2007. She taught in the Department of City & Regional Planning at the University of California at Berkeley from 2009-2011. Her teaching focused on the history of cities in the US, a practicum on local economic development, planning pedagogy, and race in the practice of city planning.
2:45 PM
Improving Job Quality Through Public Policy: Perspectives from the Private and Public Sectors
While many companies are at the forefront of promoting good jobs, the private sector alone cannot create the structural change our society needs. Policymakers and advocates must also play a crucial role in promoting job quality. Through this panel, we will learn about effective strategies to partner across the private and public sectors to achieve “wins” for workers such as paid sick days, fair scheduling, and robust benefits.
Ben Olinsky
Senior Vice President, Center for American Progess
Ben Olinsky is the senior vice president of Policy and Strategy at American Progress. He rejoined American Progress after serving as the special assistant to the president for labor and workforce policy under former President Barack Obama. At the White House, Olinsky helped craft the president’s agenda for labor and employment issues, including raising wages, expanding worker voice, protecting worker safety and health, advancing equal pay, combating discrimination, promoting paid leave, and creating pathways to jobs and opportunity. He coordinated federal efforts to update overtime protections and led the development and implementation of executive actions to raise wages, expand paid leave, and improve labor standards for federal contractors and employees. Olinsky was previously a senior fellow at American Progress, where he led the Middle-Out Economics project, researching and publishing policies to strengthen the middle class and reduce income inequality. Before his time at the White House and American Progress, Olinsky served as the legislative director for Sen. Al Franken (D-NY) and as the senior economic adviser for the late Sen. Ted Kennedy (D-MA).
Sharon Block
Professor, Harvard Law School
Sharon Block is the Executive Director of the Labor and Worklife Program at Harvard Law School. The Labor and Worklife Program is Harvard’s forum for research and teaching on the world of work an dits implications for society. Located at Harvard Law School, the LWP brings together scholars and policy experts from a variety of disciplines to analyze critical labor issues in the law, economy and society. Prior to coming to Harvard Law School in 2016, she was the Principal Deputy Assistant Secretary for Policy at the U.S. Department of Labor and Senior Counselor to the Secretary of Labor.

For twenty years, Block has held key labor policy positions across the legislative and executive branches of the federal government. Early in her career she worked as an attorney at the National Labor Relations Board, and returned to the NLRB in 2012 when she was appointed to serve as a member of the Board by President Obama. She was senior labor and employment counsel to the Senate Health, Education, Labor and Pensions Committee under Senator Edward Kennedy, playing a central role in the debate over the Employee Free Choice Act, the Mine Improvement and New Emergency Response Act, Protecting America’s Workers Act, and other major legislation related to collective bargaining, occupational safety and health, pay equity and workplace standards.

She has held senior positions in the U.S. Department of Labor throughout her career. Recently, as head of the policy office at the Department of Labor, Block hosted - with Wage and Hour Administrator David Weil and Open Societies Foundation's Ken Zimmerman - the Department's three-day symposium on the Future of Work. The symposium brought together a wide array of thought leaders to address how changes in labor markets and business models have impacts on key issues such as enforcement, labor standards, workforce development, employee benefits, and data in the U.S. and around the world.

While serving in the Obama White House as Senior Public Engagement Advisor for Labor and Working Families, Block led the historic White House Summit on Worker Voice, which explored ways for workers to fully participate in their economic future. At the President's direction, Block also conducted a series of regional worker voice summits across the country.

Block serves on a number of labor-related board and advisory committees, including as a board member of the National Employment Labor Project, advisory committee member for the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Education and Research Center, member of the Economic Policy Institute Perkins Project Advisory Committee, member of the Massachusetts Attorney General Labor Advisory Committee and member of the Higher Quality Jobs Advisory Council of the Federal Reserve Bank of Boston. In addition, she is a frequent contributor to Democracy Magazine’s Briefing Book blog and OnLabor.org.

Block received her B.A. from Columbia University and her J.D. from Georgetown University Law Center, where she received the John F. Kennedy Labor Law Award.
Vicki Shabo
VP Workplace Policies and Strategies, National Partnership for Women and Families
Vicki Shabo is vice president at the National Partnership for Women & Families and is one of the nation's leading experts on paid family and medical leave, paid sick days and the workplace policy advocacy landscape. She previously served for more than four years as the organization's director of work and family programs. Shabo is responsible for the strategic direction of the National Partnership’s work to promote fair and family friendly workplaces and leads the organization’s work on paid family and medical leave, paid sick days, expansion and enforcement of the Family and Medical Leave Act, workplace flexibility, fair pay and pregnancy discrimination. She serves as a contact on workplace policy issues for key national allies, researchers, businesses and state and local advocates and has been quoted in the New York Times, Washington Post, Associated Press, USA Today, CNN and MSNBC, among other outlets.

Shabo brings a unique background in law and politics to her work: Prior to joining the National Partnership in 2010, she practiced law in the litigation department at WilmerHale, a large international law firm. Before embarking on a legal career, she worked with both Celinda Lake and Harrison Hickman, serving as a pollster and political strategist to political candidates, ballot campaigns, advocacy organizations and media outlets. Through this work, she developed research and communications expertise on issues of particular concern to women. Shabo's earlier professional experience includes a stint with the U.S. House of Representatives Judiciary Committee.

Shabo graduated summa cum laude with a Bachelor of Arts in politics and American studies from Pomona College, and holds a Master of Arts in political science from the University of Michigan. She earned her law degree with high honors from the University of North Carolina, where she served as editor in chief of the North Carolina Law Review. After law school, she clerked for the Honorable Michael R. Murphy on the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Tenth Circuit in Salt Lake City.
MODERATOR Holly Fechner
Professor, Harvard Kennedy School
Holly Fechner is an Adjunct Lecturer in Public Policy, is a Partner at Covington & Burling LLP. Named a top lobbyist by The Hill, Ms. Fechner manages teams that handle public policy, government affairs and regulatory matters for clients in Washington, DC and around the world. Prior to joining Covington in 2007, Fechner was Policy Director for Senator Edward M. Kennedy (D-Massachusetts). In that position, she developed policy initiatives, legislation and campaigns on a broad range of issues, including the economy, health care, employment, education, retirement policy, and civil rights. She was also Chief Labor & Pensions Counsel for the Senate Health, Education, Labor & Pensions Committee. Ms. Fechner served as chief negotiator on legislation to reform the private pension system; increase the federal minimum wage; extend and reform unemployment insurance benefits; prevent genetic discrimination in health care and employment, and numerous other bills. She drafted the nation’s first paid sick days bill, which has served as a model for many states and municipalities. Fechner is Chair of the Board of the Institute for Women’s Policy Research and an appointed Member of the Maryland State Higher Education Labor Relations Board.
3:30 PM
Break
3:45 PM
Closing Keynote
The Closing Keynote will be given by Doug Rauch.
Doug Rauch
Founder/President, Daily Table
Doug is the founder/President of Daily Table, an innovative, nonprofit retail store bringing affordable nutrition to the food insecure by recovering the excess, wholesome food from growers, manufacturers and retailers to provide both ready-to-eat meals and basic groceries at prices that everyone can afford. They currently have two stores in Boston, MA.

Doug spent 31 years with Trader Joe's Company, the last 14 years as a President, helping grow the business from a small chain in Southern California, to a nationally acclaimed retail success story. He developed their prized buying philosophy, their unique private label food program, and wrote and executed the Business Plan for expanding Trader Joe’s nationally.

He graduated from Trader Joe’s in 2008.

From 2011 through June, 2017, Doug was CEO of Conscious Capitalism Inc., a nonprofit organization dedicated to elevating humanity through business; he’s is also a Trustee at Olin College of Engineering; on the Board of Overseers at WBUR; and serves on the board of several for-profit and non-profit companies.

Doug received his Executive M.B.A. from the Drucker School of Management, Claremont University. He also was a recent Senior Fellow at Harvard University where he hatched the idea of Daily Table.
4:25 PM
Closing Remarks
4:45 PM
Drinks & Networking
Friday 9 March 2018
8:00 AM
Registration / Breakfast
9:00 AM
Welcome & Opening Remarks
9:20 AM
Opening Keynote
10:00 AM
Interactive
10:25 AM

Founding Your Company on Good Jobs: A fireside chat with Managed by Q

READ MORE »

PANEL: Employee Training: Evolving Skills in a Fast-Changing Environment

READ MORE »

PANEL: Data and Measurement: Data As a Tool For Becoming a High-Road Employer

READ MORE »
11:25 AM

PANEL: Spotlight on Good Jobs in Retail & Hospitality

READ MORE »

PANEL: The Business Case for Inclusive Hiring: Connecting People with Barriers to Employment to Quality Jobs

READ MORE »
Interactive TBD
12:15 PM
Lunch
12:40 PM

Keynote Speaker

READ MORE »
1:20 PM

Lunch Interactive

READ MORE »
1:45 PM

PANEL: The Case for a Living Wage: What Does it Look Like and How Do We Get There?

READ MORE »

PANEL: Worker Voice in the 21st Century: How Workers & Business Can Co-Create Value

READ MORE »

PANEL: Success Story: Activists and Businesses Raising the Standards for Agricultural Workers

READ MORE »
2:45 PM

Improving Job Quality Through Public Policy: Perspectives from the Private and Public Sectors

READ MORE »
3:30 PM
Break
3:45 PM

Closing Keynote

READ MORE »
4:25 PM
Closing Remarks
4:45 PM
Drinks & Networking


Session descriptions


Founding Your Company on Good Jobs: A fireside chat with Managed by Q

Managed by Q is an office management company founded in 2014 to support office operations, including cleaning, maintenance, administration, IT, security, and supplies. From the beginning, Managed by Q was committed to implementing "The Good Jobs Strategy" by hiring and empowering their workers (or "operators"). In this panel, we will explore the decision by Managed by Q to employ their Operators instead of using a gig economy model. Aamir will discuss the origin story of Managed by Q, what makes the company's model successful, and what challenges his team faces running the operational day to day of Q Services (the company's in-house office management division).

Aamir Sarwar
VP SERVICES, Managed by Q
Aamir Sarwar leads Managed by Q's service company, Q Services. He manages over 700 people who provide thousands of companies with office services, including market-leading cleaning, porter, maintenance, and administrative support. He applies the good jobs strategy to Q Services' operational decisions, and recently the business unit became nationally profitable. Aamir was one of Managed by Q's first employees, and built out its first mature business in office cleaning. Prior to Q, Aamir worked as a consultant at Oliver Wyman, where he worked with the firm's telecoms and technology clients to identify operational cost efficiencies and improve customer satisfaction and retention. Aamir attended Northwestern University and majored in Economics and Political Science.


PANEL: Employee Training: Evolving Skills in a Fast-Changing Environment

In the face of a rapidly evolving labor landscape, matching workers with demand can sometimes feel like chasing a moving target. This panel will discuss innovative solutions to support employee training, including internal and industry-wide perspectives. The panel includes speakers from private and public sectors to analyze what's worked, what hasn't, and how to move forward.

Francisco Rodriguez
MANAGER, INTEGRATED ROBOTICS, DeLaval North America
Born and raised as a farmer in the beautiful mountains of Colombia.
Grown as a dairy entrepreneur.
Educated as a Doctor of Veterinary Medicine and Strategic Marketing Specialist.
Today, positioned as a global robotic farming consultant and Robotics business manager for DeLaval North America.
Francisco has been involved in the development and management of robotic dairies in North America, Latin America, Europe and Oceania. Author of multiple articles and blogs. Francisco and his wife Sofia reside in Chicago, IL where they enjoy the mix of Midwest farming and downtown living!


PANEL: Data and Measurement: Data As a Tool For Becoming a High-Road Employer

How does data collection and subsequent reporting affect a company's motivation to provide good jobs (be a high-road employer)? What are the business implications of gathering data and reporting on it to external stakeholders?

Alison Omens
DIRECTOR CORPORATE ENGAGEMENT, Just Capital


Tom Woelfel
DIRECTOR INSIGHT, Pacific Community Ventures


Amanda Kizer
ANALYTICS ASSOCIATE, B-Lab


Clara Brenner
MANAGING PARTNER, Urban Innovation Fund


PANEL: Spotlight on Good Jobs in Retail & Hospitality

The retail and hospitality sectors employ an increasingly high percentage of the American workforce, and companies in these industries have mixed track records with regards to the quality of jobs provided. Some retail and hospitality companies have recognized the fundamental link between empowering their employees and providing high levels of service to the customers in their stores, restaurants, and hotels. In this panel, we will hear from executives and employees from companies that have been leaders in viewing their customer-facing employees as assets to be empowered, not costs to be minimized. We will hear their different approaches to empowering employees, the success these policies have achieved, and the challenges of implementing large-scale change to employee policies.

Katie Bach
DIRECTOR GLOBAL STRATEGY, Starbucks
Katie is a Director of Global Strategy at Starbucks, where she leads the development of the company’s
annual strategic plan and consults on a range of strategic initiatives, including Starbucks go-to- market
approach. Prior to joining Starbucks, Katie spent two years on the leadership team of a financial advisory
and management consulting firm in Kenya, where she worked with retail and other companies on
strategic and talent-focused issues; before that, Katie was at McKinsey, where she focused on strategy,
innovation, and social sector consulting. Katie has an M.B.A. from MIT Sloan, where she was a Siebel
Scholar, a Master’s Degree from the London School of Economics, and a B.A. from Oxford University.
She currently lives in Seattle with her husband and the dog that they adopted in Nairobi.


Todd Miner
MEAT MANAGER, Costco


Catriona Eldemary
SR DIRECTOR OF HUMAN RESOURCES, Four Seasons
Catriona joined the Four Seasons Hotel Boston in 19 89 as a server in the Bristol Lounge. She worked in several positions in Food and Beverage, worked her way up through the Rooms Division ending with Director of Housekeeping. She then moved Human Resources as Assistant Director. In 1919 she transferred to Four Seasons London as their Director of Human Resources. In 2003, she made her way back to Four Seasons Boston as Director of Human Resources.

Pre-Four Seasons, Catriona worked for Aer Lingus Hotels in London, In 1987 she moved to the United States and joined Omni Hotels in Boston as a management trainee and was promoted to Purchasing Manager.

Catriona graduated from a hotel college in Ireland in 1986.


MODERATOR Jason Jay
SENIOR LECTURER AND DIRECTOR, SUSTAINABILITY INITIATIVE, MIT Sloan School of Management
Jason Jay is a Senior Lecturer at the MIT Sloan School of Management and Director of the Sustainability Initiative at MIT Sloan. His research focuses on how people navigate the tensions between personal, business, and social goals in sustainability efforts. His first book is Breaking Through Gridlock: The Power of Conversation in a Polarized World and he has published articles in the Academy of Management Journal and California Management Review. He teaches courses on strategy, innovation, and leadership for sustainable business at MIT, and engages students and alumni in hands-on projects with leading companies and organizations. Prior to MIT, Jason was a management consultant for Dialogos International, where he consulted on leadership development and organizational change for major international corporations and NGO's including BP and the World Bank. Jason holds a Ph.D. in Organization Studies from the MIT Sloan School of Management, and an AB and M.Ed from Harvard University. He lives in Newton, Massachusetts.


PANEL: The Business Case for Inclusive Hiring: Connecting People with Barriers to Employment to Quality Jobs

While the unemployment rate has remained low in recent years, quality jobs continue to be out of reach for many Americans who face barriers to employment, including opportunity youth and formerly incarcerated individuals. Through this panel, we will hear from companies that have successfully attracted, retained, and developed people with barriers to work. Panelists will discuss the business and social value generated through inclusive hiring strategies, providing the audience with practical tools to recruit and develop these untapped talent pools.

Mike Brady
CEO, Greyston Bakery
As CEO and President of Greyston since 2012, Mike has continued to build on the company’s 35‐year heritage as a pioneering social enterprise. Greyston Bakery is best known for manufacturing brownies that go into the Ben & Jerry’s Chocolate Fudge Brownie ice cream and for its practice of Open Hiring™, which embraces an individual’s potential by providing employment opportunities regardless of background or work history. Greyston has since become the first registered Beneβit Corporation in New York State, running a profitable business that supports the most economically disadvantages residents of the community.

Mike led Greyston Bakery as President for four years, driving strategic business development to 100% revenue growth with long‐standing partner Ben & Jerry’s, along with new partners such as Whole Foods Market. Recently, Mike took responsibility for all Greyston programs and businesses such as Workforce Development, Community Gardens, Housing and Health Services and the Greyston Early Learning Center.

Prior to joining Greyston, Mike was a partner with BAO Food and Drink, where he oversaw the development of the first incubator in the country dedicated to organic food production and distribution. He has more than 20 years of experience in strategy and management, identifying business opportunities in high‐growth and transitional industries. Mike serves as a business advisor to the American Sustainable Business Council (ASBC) and Social Enterprise Alliance (SEA) helping to promote policies for a sustainable economy.

Mike earned an M.B.A. from the University of Pennsylvania—the Wharton School.

Mike grew up in Rochester, New York and now lives outside of New York City with his wife and two sons.


MODERATOR Nicole Trimble
EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR IMPACT HIRING, FSG
As the Executive Director of the Impact Hiring Initiative, Nicole leads a community of pioneering employers and workforce partners interested in innovating best practices in hiring, retention, and advancement of Opportunity Youth and other populations facing barriers to employment.

Prior to joining the initiative, Nicole designed and led global Citizenship, Sustainability & Community Affairs strategies and was on the Human Resources Leadership Team at Outerwall, the company behind Redbox, Coinstar, and ecoATM. Previously she was a Program Officer at the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, advised foundation and corporate clients at Philanthropy Northwest, held several positions leading national service initiatives, and was named a White House Champion of Change.


Keynote Speaker

David Rolf
PRESIDENT, SEIU Seattle Chapter
David Rolf is known internationally as an innovative labor leader and thinker on the future of work and labor. Rolf was a leading architect of the historic fights to win a $15 living wage in SeaTac and Seattle, WA. He serves as an International Vice President of the Service Employees International Union (SEIU) and as President of SEIU 775, which represents more than 45,000 long-term care workers in the Pacific Northwest.

Rolf’s has been called “the most successful union organizer of the last 15 years” by The American Prospect, which said that “No American unionist has organized as many workers, or won them raises as substantial, as Rolf.”
Rolf writes and speaks frequently about alternative futures for U.S. worker movements, and is the author of the forthcoming book Fight for Fifteen: The Right Wage for a Working America (New Press, 2016). He has been published in The American Prospect, The Nation, Aspen Journal of Ideas, Social Policy, and Spotlight on Poverty.

Rolf is building a new labor movement, founding organizations like the Fair Work Center, Working Washington, and The Workers Lab. The Fair Work Center is a Seattle-based hub for workers to understand and exercise their legal rights, and also assists in enforcing labor law. Working Washington is a statewide organization fighting for economic justice and workers’ rights in Washington State. The California-based Workers Lab invests in projects that will create the next generation’s labor movement, building economic power for working people at a large scale while developing self-sufficient organizational revenue models.

Rolf is also the founder and board chair of the SEIU 775 Benefits Group, which provides training, health care and retirement benefits to Washington State’s home care workers. The Benefits Group is the largest long-term care workforce development organization in the country and the only organization providing Advanced Registered Apprenticeship training for home care workers. In addition to building career pathways for caregivers, the Benefits Group provides affordable, comprehensive health benefits and the nation’s first pension fund for home care workers.

Born and raised in Cincinnati, OH, Rolf graduated from Bard College and joined SEIU as an organizer in 1991. He lives with his wife in Seattle.


Lunch Interactive

Tom Kochan
GEORGE MAVERICK BUNKER PROFESSOR OF MANAGEMENT; PROFESSOR, WORK AND ORGANIZATION STUDIES, MIT Sloan School of Management


PANEL: The Case for a Living Wage: What Does it Look Like and How Do We Get There?

After a brief orientation and overview on the meaning of a Living Wage, this panel will showcase a diverse set of actors and their experiences pursuing or advocating for a Living Wage, within the primary context of the United States labor market. From their own perspective, panelists will discuss the motivation, opportunities, and strategies involved in paying a Living Wage, as well as the deep-seated challenges and their vision for moving forward.

Peter MacKinnon
PRESIDENT, SEIU Local 509


PANEL: Worker Voice in the 21st Century: How Workers & Business Can Co-Create Value

Explore how new forms of organizing are transforming business from the outside. Discuss new tactics for organizing, what works / what hasn’t, what’s changed about organizing, and how technology is changing the way workers (and other stakeholders) organize and make change. Attendees will come away with a better understanding of how workers can engage employers and other stakeholders effectively.

Abhi Adhikari
FOUNDER, Workership


Brian Lang
PRESIDENT, UNITE HERE, Local 26 Union


PANEL: Success Story: Activists and Businesses Raising the Standards for Agricultural Workers

Described as one of the “most important social-impact success stories of the past century” by the Harvard Business Review, this fireside chat will focus on the Fair Food Program, forged by the Coalition of Immokalee Workers in partnership with companies such as Whole Foods Market, Walmart, Yum Brands, and many more. In this panel, an activist and agricultural worker will be in conversation with a VP from Compass Group to discuss the challenges and opportunities in improving labor standards for agricultural workers.

Gerardo Reyes-Chavez
LEADER AND ORGANIZER AND FORMER FARMWORKER, Coalition of Immokalee Workers
GERARDO REYES CHAVEZ is a key leader of the Coalition of Immokalee Workers (CIW). Mr. Reyes is a farmworker himself and has worked in the fields since age 11, first as a peasant farmer in Zacatecas, Mexico and then in the fields of Florida picking oranges, tomatoes, blueberries, and watermelon. Mr. Reyes has worked closely with consumer allies to organize national actions -- renowned for their creativity and effectiveness -- designed to bring pressure on the large retail purchasers of Florida produce to join the Fair Food Program. He speaks publicly about the Fair Food Program at events across the country, such as the Harvard Law School Labor and Worklife Program Convening on Farm Labor Challenges and the Interfaith Council on Corporate Responsibility’s Multi-stakeholder Roundtable on Ethical Recruitment. As part of the implementation of the Fair Food Program, Mr. Reyes and his colleagues conduct workers’ rights education in the fields on all farms participating in the program. Mr. Reyes also receives complaints of abuses in the fields, manages wage theft claims, and assists in the investigation of cases of modern-day slavery when they arise.


Cheryl Queen
VP COMMUNICATIONS & CORPORATE AFFAIRS, Compass Group


MODERATOR Carmen Rojas
CEO, The Workers Lab
Carmen Rojas is the CEO of The Workers Lab, guides The Workers Lab to invest in entrepreneurs, community organizers, technologists, economic justice organizations, issue campaigns, and businesses to create scalable and self-sustaining solutions that improve conditions for low-wage workers. Under Carmen’s leadership and vision, The Workers Lab focuses on ideas, services, and products that will achieve sufficient scale to impact workers across sectors, industries, and geographies, and result in self-sufficient revenue models.

Previously, Carmen was the Acting Director of Collective Impact at Living Cities. In this capacity, she played a pivotal role supporting the work of Living Cities’ member institutions, which represented 22 of the largest foundations and financial institutions in the world. Her work focused on improving economic opportunity for low income people by supporting projects in the fields of economic and workforce development, energy efficiency, and asset building. From 2008 to 2011, Carmen was the Director of Strategic Programs at the Mitchell Kapor Foundation, where she oversaw the Foundation’s Green Access and Civic Engagement programs. Her charge involved participating in efforts to build power in low income communities and communities of color. Prior to joining the Kapor Foundation, Carmen was the Coordinator of the San Francisco Redevelopment Agency’s Taskforce on African American OutMigration. As Coordinator, she developed qualitative and quantitative reports for a taskforce established by San Francisco’s Mayor Gavin Newsom to address African American displacement from the city.

Carmen holds a Ph.D. in City and Regional Planning from the University of California, Berkeley and was a Fulbright Scholar in 2007. She taught in the Department of City & Regional Planning at the University of California at Berkeley from 2009-2011. Her teaching focused on the history of cities in the US, a practicum on local economic development, planning pedagogy, and race in the practice of city planning.


Improving Job Quality Through Public Policy: Perspectives from the Private and Public Sectors

While many companies are at the forefront of promoting good jobs, the private sector alone cannot create the structural change our society needs. Policymakers and advocates must also play a crucial role in promoting job quality. Through this panel, we will learn about effective strategies to partner across the private and public sectors to achieve “wins” for workers such as paid sick days, fair scheduling, and robust benefits.

Ben Olinsky
SENIOR VICE PRESIDENT, Center for American Progess
Ben Olinsky is the senior vice president of Policy and Strategy at American Progress. He rejoined American Progress after serving as the special assistant to the president for labor and workforce policy under former President Barack Obama. At the White House, Olinsky helped craft the president’s agenda for labor and employment issues, including raising wages, expanding worker voice, protecting worker safety and health, advancing equal pay, combating discrimination, promoting paid leave, and creating pathways to jobs and opportunity. He coordinated federal efforts to update overtime protections and led the development and implementation of executive actions to raise wages, expand paid leave, and improve labor standards for federal contractors and employees. Olinsky was previously a senior fellow at American Progress, where he led the Middle-Out Economics project, researching and publishing policies to strengthen the middle class and reduce income inequality. Before his time at the White House and American Progress, Olinsky served as the legislative director for Sen. Al Franken (D-NY) and as the senior economic adviser for the late Sen. Ted Kennedy (D-MA).


Sharon Block
PROFESSOR, Harvard Law School
Sharon Block is the Executive Director of the Labor and Worklife Program at Harvard Law School. The Labor and Worklife Program is Harvard’s forum for research and teaching on the world of work an dits implications for society. Located at Harvard Law School, the LWP brings together scholars and policy experts from a variety of disciplines to analyze critical labor issues in the law, economy and society. Prior to coming to Harvard Law School in 2016, she was the Principal Deputy Assistant Secretary for Policy at the U.S. Department of Labor and Senior Counselor to the Secretary of Labor.

For twenty years, Block has held key labor policy positions across the legislative and executive branches of the federal government. Early in her career she worked as an attorney at the National Labor Relations Board, and returned to the NLRB in 2012 when she was appointed to serve as a member of the Board by President Obama. She was senior labor and employment counsel to the Senate Health, Education, Labor and Pensions Committee under Senator Edward Kennedy, playing a central role in the debate over the Employee Free Choice Act, the Mine Improvement and New Emergency Response Act, Protecting America’s Workers Act, and other major legislation related to collective bargaining, occupational safety and health, pay equity and workplace standards.

She has held senior positions in the U.S. Department of Labor throughout her career. Recently, as head of the policy office at the Department of Labor, Block hosted - with Wage and Hour Administrator David Weil and Open Societies Foundation's Ken Zimmerman - the Department's three-day symposium on the Future of Work. The symposium brought together a wide array of thought leaders to address how changes in labor markets and business models have impacts on key issues such as enforcement, labor standards, workforce development, employee benefits, and data in the U.S. and around the world.

While serving in the Obama White House as Senior Public Engagement Advisor for Labor and Working Families, Block led the historic White House Summit on Worker Voice, which explored ways for workers to fully participate in their economic future. At the President's direction, Block also conducted a series of regional worker voice summits across the country.

Block serves on a number of labor-related board and advisory committees, including as a board member of the National Employment Labor Project, advisory committee member for the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Education and Research Center, member of the Economic Policy Institute Perkins Project Advisory Committee, member of the Massachusetts Attorney General Labor Advisory Committee and member of the Higher Quality Jobs Advisory Council of the Federal Reserve Bank of Boston. In addition, she is a frequent contributor to Democracy Magazine’s Briefing Book blog and OnLabor.org.

Block received her B.A. from Columbia University and her J.D. from Georgetown University Law Center, where she received the John F. Kennedy Labor Law Award.


Vicki Shabo
VP WORKPLACE POLICIES AND STRATEGIES, National Partnership for Women and Families
Vicki Shabo is vice president at the National Partnership for Women & Families and is one of the nation's leading experts on paid family and medical leave, paid sick days and the workplace policy advocacy landscape. She previously served for more than four years as the organization's director of work and family programs. Shabo is responsible for the strategic direction of the National Partnership’s work to promote fair and family friendly workplaces and leads the organization’s work on paid family and medical leave, paid sick days, expansion and enforcement of the Family and Medical Leave Act, workplace flexibility, fair pay and pregnancy discrimination. She serves as a contact on workplace policy issues for key national allies, researchers, businesses and state and local advocates and has been quoted in the New York Times, Washington Post, Associated Press, USA Today, CNN and MSNBC, among other outlets.

Shabo brings a unique background in law and politics to her work: Prior to joining the National Partnership in 2010, she practiced law in the litigation department at WilmerHale, a large international law firm. Before embarking on a legal career, she worked with both Celinda Lake and Harrison Hickman, serving as a pollster and political strategist to political candidates, ballot campaigns, advocacy organizations and media outlets. Through this work, she developed research and communications expertise on issues of particular concern to women. Shabo's earlier professional experience includes a stint with the U.S. House of Representatives Judiciary Committee.

Shabo graduated summa cum laude with a Bachelor of Arts in politics and American studies from Pomona College, and holds a Master of Arts in political science from the University of Michigan. She earned her law degree with high honors from the University of North Carolina, where she served as editor in chief of the North Carolina Law Review. After law school, she clerked for the Honorable Michael R. Murphy on the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Tenth Circuit in Salt Lake City.


MODERATOR Holly Fechner
PROFESSOR, Harvard Kennedy School
Holly Fechner is an Adjunct Lecturer in Public Policy, is a Partner at Covington & Burling LLP. Named a top lobbyist by The Hill, Ms. Fechner manages teams that handle public policy, government affairs and regulatory matters for clients in Washington, DC and around the world. Prior to joining Covington in 2007, Fechner was Policy Director for Senator Edward M. Kennedy (D-Massachusetts). In that position, she developed policy initiatives, legislation and campaigns on a broad range of issues, including the economy, health care, employment, education, retirement policy, and civil rights. She was also Chief Labor & Pensions Counsel for the Senate Health, Education, Labor & Pensions Committee. Ms. Fechner served as chief negotiator on legislation to reform the private pension system; increase the federal minimum wage; extend and reform unemployment insurance benefits; prevent genetic discrimination in health care and employment, and numerous other bills. She drafted the nation’s first paid sick days bill, which has served as a model for many states and municipalities. Fechner is Chair of the Board of the Institute for Women’s Policy Research and an appointed Member of the Maryland State Higher Education Labor Relations Board.


Closing Keynote

The Closing Keynote will be given by Doug Rauch.

Doug Rauch
FOUNDER/PRESIDENT, Daily Table
Doug is the founder/President of Daily Table, an innovative, nonprofit retail store bringing affordable nutrition to the food insecure by recovering the excess, wholesome food from growers, manufacturers and retailers to provide both ready-to-eat meals and basic groceries at prices that everyone can afford. They currently have two stores in Boston, MA.

Doug spent 31 years with Trader Joe's Company, the last 14 years as a President, helping grow the business from a small chain in Southern California, to a nationally acclaimed retail success story. He developed their prized buying philosophy, their unique private label food program, and wrote and executed the Business Plan for expanding Trader Joe’s nationally.

He graduated from Trader Joe’s in 2008.

From 2011 through June, 2017, Doug was CEO of Conscious Capitalism Inc., a nonprofit organization dedicated to elevating humanity through business; he’s is also a Trustee at Olin College of Engineering; on the Board of Overseers at WBUR; and serves on the board of several for-profit and non-profit companies.

Doug received his Executive M.B.A. from the Drucker School of Management, Claremont University. He also was a recent Senior Fellow at Harvard University where he hatched the idea of Daily Table.