Program

We are still working to confirm the schedule for 2015. Please stay tuned for program updates!
Friday 24 April 2015
08:00
Registration and Breakfast
09:00
Opening Remarks and Introduction: MIT's Food and Agriculture Focus
John Lienhard
Director, Abdul Latif Jameel World Water and Food Security Lab at MIT
During more than 26 years on the MIT faculty, John H. Lienhard V’s research and educational efforts have focused on water purification and desalination, heat and fluid flow, and experimentation. Professor Lienhard received his bachelors and masters degrees in thermal engineering at UCLA from the Chemical, Nuclear, and Thermal Engineering Department, where he worked on thermal instabilities in solar collectors and evaporating meniscus measurements for desalination systems. He joined MIT immediately after completing his PhD in the Applied Mechanics and Engineering Science Department at UC San Diego, where he did experimental work on thermally stratified turbulent flows. Professor Lienhard has created new courses on desalination, on thermal modeling, and on compressible fluid mechanics, as well as directly supervised more than 70 graduate theses and postdoctoral associates. Professor Lienhard is a recipient of the 1988 National Science Foundation Presidential Young Investigator Award, the 1992 SAE Teetor Award, a 1997 R&D 100 Award, and the 2012 ASME Technical Communities Globalization Medal, as well as several teaching awards at MIT. Professor Lienhard has also been is the Director of the Center for Clean Water and Clean Energy at MIT and KFUPM since it was founded in 2008.
09:15
What is the Circular Economy?
Malaika Thorne
Founder and CEO, Terracentric Press
As founder and CEO of Terracentric Press, Malaika Thorne develops financial models to implement sustainability initiatives. Malaika earned an MBA from the MIT Sloan School of Management, and a bachelor’s degree from Brown University, where she was a Oettinger National Scholar. Malaika has helped to create new businesses to support the City of San Francisco in its quest for zero waste, launch the City of Portland's curbside compost collection in Oregon, and develop a large, offshore wind power plant in Maine. She has also worked with international leaders and entrepreneurs to guide them in making products from non-traditional materials extracted from municipal solid waste, like food scraps, yard trimmings, textiles, and thin film plastics. Her unique training and perspective have enabled her to develop triple bottom line solutions on four continents. She is a contributor to the books Poor By Design: Why Poverty Persists Despite 60 Years of U.S. Foreign Aid, and The Business of Sustainability: Trends, Policies, Practices, and Stories of Success. In 2012, Malaika was recognized as a TechWomen Mentor by the U.S. State Department.
09:30
Keynote
Mr. Bauccio will share insights about how Bon Appetit Management Company has led the restaurant industry in upholding Circular Economy principles that are inclusive of environmental, social, and economic responsibilities across food production and consumption.
Fedele Bauccio
Co-Founder and CEO, Bon Appetit Management Company
Fedele Bauccio is the co-founder and CEO of Bon Appétit Management Company, which provides food service to corporations, universities, and museums in 32 states. Fedele and Bon Appétit have revolutionized the food service industry both by introducing fresh, made-from-scratch food to the contract market, and by pioneering environmentally and socially responsible practices designed to create a more sustainable food system. Bon Appetit’s Farm to Fork program marked the first of its many commitments to widening that focus to the communities in which we operate, and to the planet itself. Bon Appétit is the first food service company to commit to seafood that meets Seafood Watch sustainability guidelines for commercial buyers, to reducing antibiotic use in farm animals, to switching to rBGH-free milk and cage-free eggs, to tackling food’s role in climate change, and to addressing farmworker rights. In 2012 Bon Appétit announced a comprehensive animal welfare plan, including switching to humanely raised ground beef and to phasing out pork raised with gestation crates by the end of 2015. In November 2014, Fedele won the EY Entrepreneur Of The Year National Retail and Consumer Products Award for redefining the food service industry and pioneering environmental and local sourcing policies.
10:00
Scaling Resilience Across Production Systems (Sponsored by MIT J-WAFS)
Resilience is essential for the sustainability of our agricultural system. Crops must endure climatic variation, farms must remain viable businesses, and communities must remain empowered. Biodiverse farming can build this resilience across all production systems, including forestry, farming, grasslands, and aquaculture. This panel will demonstrate how farming techniques such as integrated pest management develop robust farming ecosystems that can yield bountiful harvests and hedge investment risks and how access to genetically diverse crops maintains social systems and food security.
Clay Mitchell
Co-founder and Managing Director, Fall Line Capital
Clay Mitchell is Co-founder and Managing Director of Fall Line Capital, a Silicon Valley-based private equity firm that buys, improves and manages farmland. Fall Line closed its first fund with $125 million of commitments in the spring of 2013. Since 2000, Mitchell has farmed 3,000 acres of corn and soybeans near Waterloo, Iowa. The Mitchell Farm has been a leader in the use of automation in farming operations and has pioneered quality testing of field operations. Mitchell consults to the largest farm in Russia and Ukraine. He is a graduate of Harvard University with a bachelor’s degree in Biomedical Engineering, and of Cornell University with a master’s degree in Crop and Soil Science, where he was a Saltonstall Fellow.
Katlyn Stillings Morris
Lecturer, University of Vermont
Dr. Katlyn Morris is a lecturer in the Environmental Program and the Department of Plant & Soil Science at the University of Vermont. Her dissertation research focused on food security for small-scale coffee farmers in El Salvador, as well as the environmental conservation potential of smallholder agriculture. Dr. Morris co-edited the textbook International Environmental Studies and received her PhD from the University of Vermont in 2012.
John Piotti
President and CEO, Maine Farmland Trust
Currently President and CEO of Maine Farmland Trust, John Piotti has been at the forefront of agricultural issues in Maine for 20 years. He is the past chair of the Northeast Sustainable Agriculture Working Group (NESAWG) and a past director of the National Campaign for Sustainable Agriculture. John has also served in Maine’s State Legislature, where he chaired the Agriculture Committee and later served as House Majority Leader. In 2005, he was named an Eisenhower Fellow. John holds three degrees from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT): in engineering, public policy, and systems management. John was named by Maine Magazine as one of the 50 people who have done the most for the state.
Ana R. Rios
Climate Change Specialist, Inter-American Development Bank
Ana R. Rios is a Climate Change Specialist at the Inter-American Development Bank. Ana works on the economic analysis of climate change, adaptation on the agricultural sector, mainstreaming of climate change and resilient infrastructure. Her work involves close interaction, dialogue and technical guidance to Ministries and institutions on these topics. She is a co-author of the book "The Climate and Development Challenge for Latin America and the Caribbean: Options for climate-resilient, low-carbon development" and has published several peer reviewed publications. She has been interviewed by CNN, New York Times and Radio France Internationale. Ana obtained a B.S. in agricultural economics and horticulture from Zamorano (2000), and then received a M.S (2003) and Ph.D. (2008) in agricultural economics from Purdue University where she also did postdoctoral research.
11:00
Coffee Break
11:30
The Role of Retail in the Circular Economy
Retailers play an important role in connecting production and consumption of goods. This panel of speakers will focus on how retail stakeholders, such as grocery markets, restaurants, food producers, and more, can individually and collectively create a more circular economy through their supply chains and on-site practices. We will look at innovative business models for returning resources back to these players as well as how retailers interact with consumers to change awareness and behaviors.
Karen Franczyk
Green Mission Coordinator for the North Atlantic Region, Whole Foods Market
Karen Franczyk is the Green Mission Coordinator for the North Atlantic region of Whole Foods Market. She has spent most of her career in retail, working a variety of jobs, and only became focused on sustainability when she and her husband decided to become farmers. They bought an organic farm in Winchendon, MA, which they named The Big Red Barn. After a couple years as a CSA, they found their niche selling their organic heirloom tomatoes to Whole Foods Market. This relationship led to Karen deciding to work for Whole Foods Market in June, 2001. She started as a supervisor in the front end, and worked her way up through the stores, spending the last 7 years in Operations as a Store Team leader in both Providence, RI (Waterman St.) and Newton, MA (Four Corners). After 12 years in Operations, Karen moved over to the Store Development Team, where she became the Green Mission Coordinator for the North Atlantic Region. In addition to her career with Whole Foods Market, Karen also spent 3 years on the board of directors for the Northeast Organic Farming Association (NOFA) Mass, two years on a Central Mass Buy Local campaign, and she currently volunteers for a local chapter of Scholarship America.
Tim Greiner
Co-founder and Managing Director, Pure Strategies
Tim Greiner has pioneered approaches to building environmental and social integrity into products, brands, and businesses. His experience spans the spectrum from developing corporate strategy for multinationals, designing product sustainability programs, creating strategies to transform supply chains and fostering collaborative mechanisms to lift the sustainability performance of entire industries. He is currently working with several progressive businesses on deepening their corporate responsibility efforts through product innovation and supply chain engagement. Current and former clients include Annie’s, Walmart, Seventh Generation, The North Face, Stonyfield Farm, EMD Millipore and US EPA.
Tim holds masters’ degrees in Environmental Policy and Business from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and a bachelor’s degree in Materials Science Engineering from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. He is a founding member of the Massachusetts Toxics Use Reduction Planners Association and a former Board member and President. He is also founder of the Cape Ann Climate Change Network and is a Research Associate at the Lowell Center for Sustainable Production. Tim has experience in industry as a Process Engineer for Fairchild Semiconductor. He also worked for the Massachusetts Office of Technical Assistance as Project Director and Chief Engineer.
Namrita Kapur
Environmental Defense Fund, Managing Director of Corporate Partnerships Program
Namrita Kapur manages EDF's work that focuses on driving positive environmental change through corporate value chains. Drawing from her background in strategy, finance, and international development, Namrita's particular focus is on helping the team develop strategies to accelerate innovation in the corporate sector; exploring opportunities for leveraging capital markets; and, building out our international approach. Namrita leads EDF's collaboration with AT&T, focused on reducing water use in commercial buildings; directly manages our efforts to improve the efficiency of freight in companies; and oversees the work on finance and commodity agriculture, including REDD financing.
Prior to joining Environmental Defense Fund, Namrita played an integral role in establishing the strategy and developing the infrastructure of Root Capital – a social investment fund pioneering finance in rural communities in the developing world. She has previously directed programs for the Environmental League of Massachusetts and Berkshire Natural Resources Council, and worked as a consultant for the United Nations Development Program. She currently serves as Treasurer for the Board of the Environmental League of Massachusetts; and on the Advisory Board of the Sustainability Accounting Standards Board
Britt Lundgren
Director of Organic and Sustainable Agriculture , Stonyfield
Britt Lundgren is the Director of Organic and Sustainable Agriculture at Stonyfield Farm. She holds a Master of Science in Agriculture, Food, and Environment from Tufts University. Prior to joining Stonyfield in 2011, Britt spent five years as an agricultural policy specialist for Environmental Defense Fund in Washington, D.C. Together with Stonyfield co-founder and chair Gary Hirshberg and Dr. Charles Benbrook, she is the co-author of Label It Now, a book that makes the case for labeling genetically engineered foods. Britt serves on the boards of the Conservation Law Foundation of New Hampshire and the Sustainable Food Trade Association. She has worked on organic farms in Maine, Massachusetts, and Colorado. She is also an avid fiddle player and member of the New Hampshire-based Hickory Horned Devils.
12:30
Lunch
13:30
Technology, Agriculture and Circularity (Sponsored by MIT J-WAFS)
Transitioning to a more circular agriculture system will require a complete re-thinking of how food is produced, with a focus on making this production more sustainable without sacrificing yield. In recent years there has been a surge of technology and data use on the farm that provides a glimpse of how the agriculture system of the future can be more productive as well as environmentally sound. This panel explores the latest developments in crop modeling, precision agriculture and drone technology, with a focus on solutions that can be adopted by farmers at scale. The panelists will discuss the challenges and opportunities of using technology to change the shape of our agriculture system.
Bruno Basso
Associate Professor, Michigan State University
Bruno Basso's research deals mainly with water, carbon, nitrogen cycling and modeling in agro-ecosystems, and spatial analysis of crop yield. Basso's modeling research has focused on extending soil-crop-atmosphere models to spatial domains at the field scale, and in particular on developing, testing, and deploying SALUS, a next-generation process-based model that integrates crop productivity with water, carbon, and nutrient fluxes in a spatially explicit manner. Through this research, it has been possible to integrate the effects of topography and soil properties on soil water balance, and thereby partition surface vs. subsurface flows in different landscape positions. This has important value for better understanding and predicting nitrogen conservation patterns in cropped landscapes as well as soil carbon change - and has led to important insights for the likely effects of climate change on carbon and water footprints of future cropping systems, as noted in recent publications.
Thomas Haun
VP of Strategy and Globalization, PrecisionHawk
Thomas Haun serves as the VP of Strategy and Globalization for PrecisionHawk. Haun is a marketing, sales and business development professional with a decade of experience in building new business opportunities, maximizing financial impact, and identifying maneuvers for global economic trends. With an undergraduate degree in Economics and Mathematics and a Harvard MBA, Haun has spent the last 10 years helping multi-billion dollar companies grow partnerships, increase revenue, and carry out successful new business efforts. From 2005 to 2009, Haun assumed multiple key roles at Northrop Grumman that ultimately led to over $1B in new contracts. Following his move to DuPont/Pioneer in 2011, Haun drove over $80M in additional revenue opportunity by pinpointing agriculture trends, designing a scalable agriculture services business, reducing development time-to-market and maximizing overall financial gain.
Jason Jay
Director, MIT Sloan Initiative for Sustainable Business and Society
Jason Jay is Director of the Sustainability Initiative at MIT Sloan. In this capacity, he directs the strategy and implementation of the School’s goals toward including sustainability content in the curriculum for all students, coordinating a vibrant Sustainability Certificate program for qualified Masters’ students, and supporting sustainability related research from all management disciplines. He spearheads the Initiative’s fundraising efforts and engagement with industry and policymakers. Dr. Jay co-teaches the flagship course series Strategies for Sustainable Business and Laboratory for Sustainable Business (S-Lab), teaches executive education programs on sustainability for MIT, and conducts research on hybrid organizations and the pitfalls and pathways of sustainability leadership.
John Rogers
Global Director of Agricultural Development, Anheuser-Busch InBev
John Rogers is the Global Director of Agricultural Development for Anheuser-Busch InBev, where he leads the Global Barley Research organization - a team of global scientists focused on developing new varieties that improve yield, disease resistance and brewing quality in key supply markets. John also heads AB InBev’s SmartBarley program (www.smartbarley.com), a global portfolio of development initiatives dedicated to improving productivity, farm profitability and environmental stewardship through disseminating new technologies and improved practices to farmer suppliers. His teams’ research and development initiatives span AB InBev’s global supply chain, focused on strengthening existing barley supply markets in the Americas and Europe while helping develop new markets in Asia and Africa. John holds an MBA from Harvard Business School and a BS in Mechanical Engineering from NC State University. Based in Leuven, Belgium, John grew up on a cattle farm in western North Carolina.
Molly Toot
SUSTAINTM Brand Manager, United Suppliers Inc.
Molly Toot has lived in central Iowa all of her life and has worked in the agriculture industry for close to 20 years. Currently she manages the SUSTAIN platform for United Suppliers which is a nutrient management strategy for United Suppliers and its locally controlled retailers. As manager of this platform, Molly works with ag retailers to train their agronomy sales teams on the components of SUSTAIN, which includes nutrient management and conservation. In addition to working with the sales teams, Molly is often asked to present SUSTAIN to growers and provide information on the tools and technologies for best management practices specific to nutrient management. Finally, Molly works closely with supply chain partners within their sustainable sourcing regions to help connect them with SUSTAIN ag retailers and ultimately the growers that are using best management practices. Prior to her work at United Suppliers, Molly worked for Land O’Lakes and Syngenta. She graduated from Simpson College with a Marketing Degree and has been pursuing her Masters in AgriBusiness from K-State University.
14:50
Creating Consumption Cascades
Biological materials can be "cascaded" through multiple beneficial uses before ultimately returning to the earth for conversion back into raw nutrients. Identifying creative and profitable cascades from food and biomaterials waste is essential to the circular economy. This panel highlights some innovative companies, technologies, and materials that are creating circularity through consumption cascades.
Lydia Baird
Co-Founder, Ego Sum Terra
Lydia Baird is a designer and materials specialist. She is pursuing a Textile Development and Marketing degree at the Fashion Institute of Technology, while also working as a member of the Local 829 Costume Design Union. On campus, she is a member of the Natural Dye Garden and American Association of Textile Colorists and Chemists clubs. Off campus, she volunteers at Earth Matter, a local composting facility.

Through her work as a designer, Lydia experiences first-hand the amount of textile waste in industry. This past fall she co-founded Ego Sum Terra, a student initiative to develop and implement a textile compost system at FIT. Her goal is to manage all the organic waste on campus whether it be food, yarns or finished fabrics through composting and research the impacts of doing so. She hopes to develop a set of standards to introduce the system to other schools and businesses. Prior to FIT, Lydia received a BA in Costume Design and Spanish from Middlebury College in Vermont.
Cheryl Baldwin
VP of Consulting, Pure Strategies
Cheryl Baldwin, Ph.D., is a Vice President of Consulting for Pure Strategies where she partners with corporate clients to develop and execute strategies to improve sustainability performance across food, home and personal care, and cosmetics industries. Cheryl also leads the firms’ global market research to generate new insights to accelerate business transformation.

Cheryl’s recent projects include helping build and implement a proactive approach to antibiotic use and animal welfare in the food supply chain for a major food retailer, assisting with the development of a “net positive” sustainability strategy for a food brand, and facilitating the development of a strategic chemicals management program for a home and personal care company.

Cheryl authored Pure Strategies’ market research report, The Path to Product Sustainability, and the book, The 10 Principles of Food Industry Sustainability (March 2015). She is the lead author/editor for two additional books on sustainability, Sustainability in the Food Industry and Greening Food and Beverage Services and holds U.S. and international patents. Cheryl holds a Ph.D. and M.S. from Cornell University and a B.S. from the University of Illinois, all in Food Science.
Sandy Merkel DeJames
Head of Business Relations and Development, Novozyme
Head of Business Relations and Development, Novozymes Sandra has broad experience in the biotechnology industry, in direct research, early stage commercialization and technology development. She is experienced in identifying new technology applications, integrating next-generation market needs with technology, and strategy development for new market entry across numerous industries, including biopharmaceutical, medical device, food and agriculture. Currently, Sandra is Head of Business Relations and Development, supporting Novozymes global businesses by engaging external stakeholders, building external networks, identifying new opportunities for Novozymes, and securing anchoring of these opportunities.

In her time at Novozymes, Sandra has been responsible for leading global commercialization and market strategy development of next-generation products and technologies in biopharmaceuticals and cell therapy, during which time she played a key role in developing a new therapeutic cell-based technology to address next-generation market needs. She has also been responsible for creating and building new businesses within Novozymes, and expanding Novozymes’ market and technology base, through development of new technology applications and in-licensing new technologies. Prior to her current role, Sandra led the Post-Harvest Preservation platform, focusing on development of microorganisms and microbial-based technologies for use in agriculture and the post-harvest supply chain. Sandra holds a Ph.D. in Biology, and completed her Post-Doctoral training at the UNC School of Medicine.
Sue Van Hook
Chief Mycologist, Ecovative
Sue Van Hook began her affiliation with Ecovative as a mycological consultant at the inception of the company in 2007. Three years later she left her college teaching career in biology and environmental science at Skidmore College to join Ecovative full time. As the Chief Mycologist she procures new fungi from the forests for optimization in Ecovative's plant/fungus biocomposite materials.
16:00
Coffee Break
16:30
Agriculture and Food Waste in Urban Settings (Sponsored by J-WAFS)
This panel will focus on two elements of food systems in cities – how to manage organic waste on a city-wide level, as well as how to produce food in an urban setting. How can we design systems via urban planning or technological advances to help facilitate this loop? How can we educate and incentivize city-dwellers about these opportunities?
Kelliann Blazek
Visiting Fellow, Harvard Food Law and Policy Clinic
Kelliann Blazek is an attorney and works as a consultant at the Harvard Food Law and Policy Clinic. Her work primarily focuses on tax incentives for food donations and food systems planning. She is a graduate of the University of Wisconsin Law School, where she co-founded the Wisconsin Agricultural and Food Law Society and served as a co-editor of the 2013 Wisconsin Law Review Symposium, themed “Safety and Sustainability in the Era of Food Systems.” During law school, she worked at the Supreme Court of Wisconsin and numerous food law organizations, including Farmers’ Legal Action Group and Farm Commons. Before law school, she received a MA in journalism and worked as a freelance writer for agricultural publications. She also co-authored two publications on organic agriculture while working at the Wisconsin Department of Agriculture, Trade and Consumer Protection. Kelliann’s passion for food law and policy stems from her experience growing up on her family’s farm in rural Wisconsin. She is a licensed member of the State Bar of Wisconsin.
Edith Murnane
Food Systems Advocate and Director of Food Initiatives, City of Boston
Edith Murnane was appointed Boston’s first Director of Food Initiatives by Mayor Thomas Menino in July 2010, to help increase access to fresh eats and expand opportunities for urban farming. Murnane, a resident of Jamaica Plain, came to her current role through her work on the Boston Food Council. She also did sales and marketing for the Milk Street Cafe and managed the sustainable food programs for Community Servings – a Jamaica Plain nonprofit that provides home delivered meals to people with life threatening illnesses. Murnane grew up on a 700-acre apple orchard in rural Schoharie, NY. After some years working in corporate events planning, Murnane began her cooking career making oven-roasted Viennese plum tarts and other goodies for sale in farmers’ markets under the label Edith’s Edibles. From 2000-2005, she owned and cooked at The Cantata, a restaurant on Centre Street in Jamaica Plain, known for its extraordinary chili that tempered the bite of chipotle peppers with dark Belgian chocolate. Her education includes a BA in History from Boston University and training at the Cambridge Culinary Institute.
Malaika Thorne
Founder and CEO, Terracentric Press
As founder and CEO of Terracentric Press, Malaika Thorne develops financial models to implement sustainability initiatives. Malaika earned an MBA from the MIT Sloan School of Management, and a bachelor’s degree from Brown University, where she was a Oettinger National Scholar. Malaika has helped to create new businesses to support the City of San Francisco in its quest for zero waste, launch the City of Portland's curbside compost collection in Oregon, and develop a large, offshore wind power plant in Maine. She has also worked with international leaders and entrepreneurs to guide them in making products from non-traditional materials extracted from municipal solid waste, like food scraps, yard trimmings, textiles, and thin film plastics. Her unique training and perspective have enabled her to develop triple bottom line solutions on four continents. She is a contributor to the books Poor By Design: Why Poverty Persists Despite 60 Years of U.S. Foreign Aid, and The Business of Sustainability: Trends, Policies, Practices, and Stories of Success. In 2012, Malaika was recognized as a TechWomen Mentor by the U.S. State Department.
17:15
Keynote
Ken Webster
Head of Innovation, Ellen MacArthur Foundation
Ken Webster has an extensive background in economics education, teaching, teacher training
and curriculum development. He writes extensively on the circular economy and its connections with systems thinking. He has been working at the Foundation since the end of 2009 and was a part of its establishment in 2010.
17:45
Closing
18:00
Networking Happy Hour
19:00
MIT Waste Research and Innovation Night
Interested in seeing some cutting-edge research and start-ups around waste-sector innovations from MIT students, alums, and the surrounding community? MIT Waste Alliance, in collaboration with the Sustainability Summit, invites you to the inaugural MIT Waste Research and Innovation Night! Snacks & refreshments will be provided. If you are interested in exhibiting, please apply here.
Saturday 25 April 2015
08:45
Registration and Coffee
09:15
Opening Remarks and Keynote
Mr. Matteucci will speak to how private sector capital can help jumpstart Circular Economy businesses with goals to build a food system that can feed 10 billion people.
Paul Matteucci
Operating Partner, US Venture Capital Partners
At USVP, Paul has led or co-led investments in 3Ware (sold to AMCC), Total Beauty, Trovix (sold to Monster), PlaceIQ, Swoop, and others. He has also served on the board of Homestead (sold to Intuit) and was an Angel Investor in Fra' Mani, a sustainable food producer. During his early tenure at USVP, Paul served as interim CEO of several of the firm's portfolio companies. Paul's current interests on the technology landscape include: internet-based services, data analytics, mobile computing, audience measurement and aggregation, data storage, and rethinking the industrial food system. Paul sees the issue of feeding a growing population without environmental damage as both a major challenge for governments and businesses, as well as an enormous opportunity for creative entrepreneurs. He and his family have founded "Feeding 10 Billion", a non-profit resource center for food system entrepreneurs. He serves as a trustee of the World Affairs Council and is a board member of the University of the Pacific's School of International Studies and of the Business School at Montana State University in Bozeman.
09:55
Closing the Big Loop: Energy and Nutrient Recovery from Waste
In a Circular Economy, outputs become inputs. Technological advancements and changes in the perception of waste, however, can help connect waste streams to new processes. Manure can power farms or be transformed into a commodity fuel that flows through pipelines. Human urine, if diverted from traditional wastewater systems, can function as a fertilizer. This panel covers the technologies and infrastructural changes necessary to turn these wastes into resources.
Jon Duschinsky
CEO, The Conversation Farm
Jon is the co-founder and CEO of The Conversation Farm, a global agency that creates business and social solutions by socializing ideas that engage millions of people in conversations. The Conversation Farm’s recent work includes helping global cosmetic firms put social good at the heart of their industry, working with the White House to reframe the conversation on gun control in the US, and putting children in control of the fight against childhood obesity. Jon is also the acting CEO of Oreka Solutions, a sustainable technologies incubator focused on reducing waste, preserving water, and supporting agriculture. Presently, Oreka Solutions is developing an environmentally friendly and cost effective method to turn food waste into animal feed, thereby reducing the amount of natural resources needed to produce feed while also minimizing the amount of food waste sent to landfills. Jon talks to audiences around the world about how to increase their engagement on sustainability issues, sharing speaking platforms with Mikhail Gorbachev, Kofi Annan, and other global leaders. In 2013 The Business of Giving voted Jon the world's second most influential communicator on social innovation- beaten only by Bill Clinton.
Jeremy Goodfellow
Vice President of Energy Operations, Harvest Power
Mr. Goodfellow has over 15 years of professional experience in the chemical, energy and agriculture industries, currently overseeing Harvest Power’s energy facilities. Harvest Power operates three anaerobic digesters in North America, producing energy and fertilizer from organic waste materials. Prior to his work at Harvest, Mr. Goodfellow reenergized a regional agricultural retail company, supplying crop inputs and innovative solutions to farmers. He has also worked in several start-ups, including building a state-of-the-art biodiesel facility and developing a chemical distribution division.
William Jorgenson
Managing Partner, Agreen Energy LLC, Bgreen Energy LLC
Mr. Jorgenson has been managing partner of Agreen Energy and Bgreen Energy since their formation in 2008. The companies now have two operating digesters in Rutland, MA that also serve as a case study for the MA Department of Environmental Protection. Mr. Jorgenson provides digester policy expertise to the dairy industry as a member of Dairy Management Inc., the national dairy farmers’ trade association. Prior to his work in digesters, he ran a strategic management consulting group, SJH and Company, and held executive roles in the food and agricultural industry.
John Monaghan
Business Development Specialist, Innovation Center for U.S. Dairy
John Monaghan is a business development specialist at the Innovation Center for U.S. Dairy®. The Innovation Center is a forum for the dairy industry to work pre-competitively to address barriers to and opportunities for innovation and sales growth. He is responsible for managing business development activities related to the Innovation Center’s Sustainability Council (a multistakeholder group consisting of 120 organizations from across the dairy value chain), the U.S. Dairy Sustainability Awards program, and a portfolio of strategic partnerships.

Prior to joining the Innovation Center, Monaghan spent time as a legislative specialist for energy and environmental policy at a public policy think tank. He also served as a paralegal specialist in the Wildlife and Marine Resources Section of the U.S. Department of Justice, Environment and Natural Resources Division. He holds a bachelor’s degree in environmental studies from the University of Michigan-Ann Arbor with a specialty in business, law and the environment.
Abe Noe-Hays
Research Director, Rich Earth Institute
Abe Noe-Hays is the Research Director at the Rich Earth Institute, developing and testing practical tools for the collection, treatment, and agricultural reuse of urine. He has been working with dry sanitation systems since 1990. He holds a B.A. in Human Ecology–with concentrations in agroecology and compost science–from the College of the Atlantic, where his interest in recycling human waste led to an
internship at Woods End Research Laboratory and his thesis project, “An Experiment in Thermophilic Composting Toilet Design.” He has operated Full Circle Compost Consulting since 2001, providing complete
design, manufacture, and maintenance services to individuals and institutions with dry toilet systems. He is also the eco-sanitation expert for Sustainable Harvest International, which he has helped to initiate urine-diversion projects in Nicaragua, Honduras, Panama, and Belize.
09:55
Aquaculture: Transitioning to Sustainable and Diversified Products (Sponsored by Delhaize)
The technical processes for culturing fish using environmentally friendly methods have existed for many years, but historically the costs have made them economically unfeasible. However, over the past several years the market has seen more and more companies incorporate these processes into their operations. Some companies are even pioneering new ways to convert what were once waste streams into marketable products, which is making aquaculture a more circular system of food production. This panel explores the conditions and processes that have allowed companies to offset the higher costs of sustainable aquaculture, and discuss how aquaculture can contribute to a more circular agriculture system.
Mike Finnegan
Co-founder, Continental Organics
Mike Finnegan is an environmental lawyer, retired investment banker, entrepreneur and US Army JAG officer. He resides in Garrison, New York with his wife Candace and three children.

After retiring from JP Morgan in 2008, Mike was re-commissioned in the United States Army as a JAG Officer and completed basic training at age 53. He remains the oldest-ever graduate of the Army Basic Officer Leaders Course at Ft. Benning. He continues to serve as a JAG in the 7th Legal Operations Detachment in Albany.
The following year, Mike co-founded Continental Organics, a Sustainable Agriculture Company that uses controlled environment agriculture systems to produce Coho Salmon, Tilapia, over 50 varieties of vegetables, and compost for sale in the Hudson Valley market. The Company has 175,000 sq. ft. of indoor growing facilities and is the largest food producer of its kind in the northeast. It is a certified 8-A “Service Disabled Veteran Owned Small Business” and currently employs 33 people; 60% of whom are veterans.
Bill Martin
President and CEO, Blue Ridge Aquaculture
Mr. Martin, President and CEO of Blue Ridge Aquaculture, possesses a longstanding successful career in aquaculture. The technical developments that have enabled continuous rearing of fish under high density recirculating conditions without the use of antibiotics, hormones, or genetically modified fish have been refined by Mr. Martin and his staff for more than 20 years. As a result, Blue Ridge Aquaculture has become North America's largest Tilapia producer. Mr. Martin is a member of multiple US aquaculture organizations including the Board for the Center for Environment, Fisheries and Aquaculture Science (CEFAS), where he previously served as Co-Chair, and the National Aquaculture Association (NAA). He serves as Vice-Chair on the Board of Directors for the Southern Regional Aquaculture Association (SRAC) as well as Vice-Chair for the Virginia Marine Products Board. He is also Chairman of the Board, and a Founding Member of the US Aquaculture Coop. Mr. Martin has served as an operational consultant to multiple aquaculture companies where he has evaluated both large and small aquaculture production entities on a global basis in North America, Europe, Asia, Africa, and the Middle East.
Norman McCowan
President and COO, Bell Aquaculture
Norman McCowan has a passion for fish. This passion has led him to become an industry leader in aquaculture and strive to create the optimal operational structure for sustainability in the industry. Norman has been involved in raising, breeding and marketing fish for more than a decade. With over 16 years of production management experience, Norman was named Operations Manager for Bell Aquaculture in 2007. Norman was responsible for overseeing all production processes at the farm, including raising fish from egg to fry to juvenile to market-size through a scientific and Earth-friendly approach. In May of 2009, Norman was named President & COO. His strong leadership, dedication to excellence and desire to innovate continue to make Bell a leader in sustainable fish farming. In addition, Norman has worked with various universities and industry experts to refine Bell’s processes and identify research opportunities to improve the quality and health of the fish we consume.
Clifford Morris
Founder, Florida Organic Aquaculture
Clifford Morris’ extensive knowledge as an “entrepreneur” with over three decades of experience in financial planning and business development has led to the creation of numerous innovative projects and investment opportunities throughout the U.S., South Africa, and Europe. In his South African homeland, Cliff founded Sirius Financial Navigation, his own Financial Services and Portfolio Fund Management firm.

Moving with his family to South Florida provided Cliff with the opportunity to implement his Sustainable Food Production Strategy. He founded Florida Organic Aquaculture, LLC in Fellsmere, Florida with several million dollars of personal capital at risk. Currently, Florida Organic Aquaculture is the largest bio-secure and environmentally beneficial production facility of this type in the world. The company serves as a model for Cliff’s “triple bottom line; profits, people, planet” sustainable business strategy; offering economic value through increased innovation and capital efficiency, community value through job creation, infrastructure improvements and long-term community enhancements, and environmental value through optimized and integrated systems maximizing resource efficiency. Currently, demand for the company’s fresh, all-natural shrimp is outpacing supply.

In 2011, Cliff established the Florida Aquaculture Foundation, a 501©3 non-profit dedicated to advancing the aquaculture industry and helping individuals achieve economic empowerment through education and training.
Matt Thompson
Aquaculture Project Lead, New England Aquarium
Matt Thompson is the Aquaculture Project Lead for the New England Aquarium Sustainable Seafood Programs (SSP). His role is two-fold: primarily he is responsible for researching and developing reports and recommendations related to aquaculture for the SSP corporate partners, but he also undertakes special projects design to expedite the development and uptake of more sustainable aquaculture practices. He leads the Aquarium’s efforts to improve shrimp farming. Since joining the New England Aquarium in 2007 he has developed expertise in all areas of aquaculture, travelled to multiple aquaculture operations around the world, and authored over 50 sustainability reports across a range of farmed species from numerous countries. Through his participation on technical committees, he has helped promote sustainability criteria in aquaculture certification standards, including the Global Aquaculture Alliance Best Aquaculture Practices (GAA BAP) and the Aquaculture Stewardship Council (ASC). He is a member of the Aquaculture Expert Working Group for the Global Seafood Sustainability Initiative (GSSI), which is working to define a globally recognized benchmarking process for responsible and credible seafood certification. Matt has a bachelor’s degree in marine science from Southampton University in the UK. His aquaculture focus stems from a Master’s degree in aquaculture from Stirling University in Scotland.
11:15
Keynote
Dr. Thrupp will leverage her diverse experiences with sustainable agriculture and food systems, both domestically and internationally, to discuss the role that private companies, governments, academia, and others play in the transition to more sustainable and equitable agriculture and food systems.
L. Ann Thrupp
Executive Director of the Berkeley Food Institute, U.C. Berkeley
Ann Thrupp is the Executive Director of the Berkeley Food Institute, at the University of California, Berkeley, which is aimed to catalyze and support the transformation of food and agriculture systems, to promote sustainability, justice, diversity, resilience and health. Ann has extensive experience in sustainable and organic agriculture and food systems, in the United States and internationally. For over 25 years, she has been a pioneer in this field – actively involved in sustainable approaches to farming and agroecology, through research, education, public service, and in farming and food business. She has held leadership positions in non-profit organizations, government, academia, and as a practitioner and educator in sustainable agriculture, natural resource management, and in social justice. Before beginning her current position at the Berkeley Food Institute, Ann was Manager of Sustainability and Organic Development at Fetzer and Bonterra Vineyards (2003-13). Ann also served as the Managing Director and consultant for the California Sustainable Winegrowing Alliance (CSWA) in 2005-2007. During 1999-2002, Ann worked with the Environmental Protection Agency’s Agriculture Initiative in the Western Region office, and from 1990-1998, she was Director of Sustainable Agriculture at World Resources Institute, working on projects in Latin America and other regions of the world. Ann has over 70 publications, and served on a Scientific Advisory Committee of the CA Department of Food and Agriculture, and on two committees of the National Academy of Science.
11:45
Lunch and Keynote
Precious few North Americans have any idea of how much waste they produce, nor where it goes. Out of sight is out of mind, and in the last 50 years our societies have developed intricate constructs to ensure that we don’t have to worry about what we throw away. To get the circular economy truly turning, we have to understand these constructs and get really skilled in knowing how to change them. Just having great technology and production isn’t enough any more. We need to know how to engage people, change attitudes and help reframe the conversation about waste vs resource and what all that really means. Jon Duschinsky will draw on his double experience as a marketing guru and the CEO of one of North America’s most innovative circular economy businesses to challenge your thinking about what we need to do to truly “grow the circle”.
Jon Duschinsky
CEO, The Conversation Farm
Jon is the co-founder and CEO of The Conversation Farm, a global agency that creates business and social solutions by socializing ideas that engage millions of people in conversations. The Conversation Farm’s recent work includes helping global cosmetic firms put social good at the heart of their industry, working with the White House to reframe the conversation on gun control in the US, and putting children in control of the fight against childhood obesity. Jon is also the acting CEO of Oreka Solutions, a sustainable technologies incubator focused on reducing waste, preserving water, and supporting agriculture. Presently, Oreka Solutions is developing an environmentally friendly and cost effective method to turn food waste into animal feed, thereby reducing the amount of natural resources needed to produce feed while also minimizing the amount of food waste sent to landfills. Jon talks to audiences around the world about how to increase their engagement on sustainability issues, sharing speaking platforms with Mikhail Gorbachev, Kofi Annan, and other global leaders. In 2013 The Business of Giving voted Jon the world's second most influential communicator on social innovation- beaten only by Bill Clinton.
13:00
Breaking Down Food Packaging
With recent debates focused on preserving freshness to decrease food waste at the expense of increasing synthetic packaging waste, this panel will focus on an important part in revising the food system. To decrease total waste, we will be looking at a range of potential packaging options, including edible packaging, and compostable and bio-derived polymers.
13:00
New Ventures in the Circular Economy
The panel's focus will be to highlight start-ups that are actively changing food systems to be more self-sustaining. We will hear from food and agriculture-related start-ups that are operating across the value chain and learn about their successes and challenges, as well as the implications of how they are changing the status quo.
Catherine Fazio
Director, Lab for Innovation Science, MIT Innovation Initiative
Catherine Fazio is the Managing Director of the Laboratory for Innovation Science and Policy at the MIT Innovation Initiative. She directs the launch and strategy of this newly-formed research laboratory which studies the factors shaping innovation outcomes and investigates how to accelerate innovation in service to the world. Catherine previously served as a partner at Kirkland & Ellis, LLP. Among other activities, she formulated the strategy and directed operations for multiple, billion dollar arbitrations, served as lead antitrust counsel on a range of multi-national mergers and acquisitions, and counseled clients on risk mitigation strategies. Catherine was also a trial attorney for the Antitrust Division of the U.S. Department of Justice, where she led several significant merger investigations and worked to preserve competition in numerous industries. Catherine serves on the Development Committee for the Atrium School in Watertown, Massachusetts. Catherine received a J.D. from Stanford University, an M.B.A. from the Sloan Fellows Program in Innovation and Global Leadership at MIT, and a B.A. from the University of California, Berkeley.
Igor Kharitonenkov
Co-founder, Bootstrap Compost
Igor Kharitonenkov is an entrepreneur that specializes in environmental sustainability and business development. Igor graduated from Indiana University with a bachelor's degree in Psychology. After stints in neuroscience and media production, Igor co-founded Bootstrap Compost, where he manages operations, staffing and development for Greater Boston's premier food scrap pickup service. Bootstrap helps thousands of folks aspire to a zero-waste lifestyle at home, at work and beyond. The company is helping to build a cleaner and greener city right here in Boston by reducing waste, creating a valuable resource for local growers in the form of soil amendment, offsetting greenhouse gases through composting and promoting sustainable lifestyles to the public. To date, Bootstrap has helped keep over 700,000 lbs of organic material out of landfills, offsetting the release of over 650,000 lbs of harmful GHGs while creating over 300,000 lbs of soil amendment for the community.
Brad McNamara
CEO and Co-founder, Freight Farms
Brad McNamara is the CEO and co-founder of Freight Farms, an agriculture technology company that provides tools for a more sustainable and connected food system. Brad and his co-founder developed their flagship product, the Leafy Green Machine, to allow any business to grow a high-volume of fresh produce in any environment regardless of the climate. He has big expectations for the future, envisioning Freight Farms scattered across the globe making a dramatic impact on how food is produced. Brad has an MBA and Masters in Environmental Science from Clark University. Follow him on twitter at @CarFreeBrad.
Lauren Rathmell
Greenhouse Director, Lufa Farms
auren Rathmell is a founding member of Lufa Farms and serves as Greenhouse Director, overseeing all farming and plant science activities for the company’s two rooftop greenhouses. Lufa Farms built the world’s first commercial rooftop greenhouse with the vision of changing the way the world eats and creating an ecologically and economically sustainable model for urban farming. Lauren holds a degree in biochemistry from McGill University and is passionate about sustainable growing.
14:20
Financing the Transition to Circular Agriculture
Achieving a more circular agriculture system at scale will require private sector involvement in the form of venture capital, private equity and impact investing. This panel brings together experts in sustainable agriculture investing to discuss the unique challenges of funding ventures in agriculture, as well as the financial innovations that are being used to invest in real assets such as farmland. Collectively bringing decades of operational and financial experience in the agriculture sector, panelists will provide an in-depth discussion on the role of finance in a more circular agriculture system.
Gray Harris
Director of Sustainable Agriculture and Food Systems, Coastal Enterprises Inc.
Gray supervises CEI’s agriculture and food system program, an integrated value-chain program whose mission is to support the growth of Maine’s sustainable agriculture sector and create access to healthy foods for all people, regardless of income. She is responsible for the management, development, and deployment of Sustainable Agriculture Investment Funds and Healthy Food Finance Initiative Funds. She assesses sector needs and identifies sources of specialized technical assistance and financing for agricultural and food system start-up and expanding businesses; and sources and aligns investment-ready projects with CEI lending and investment staff. Gray is former director of the Maine Farms for the Future program, a statewide business planning and grants program for Maine farmers. She participates in numerous action-oriented agricultural initiatives statewide, such as the Beginning Farmer Resource Network; and serves on the steering committee of Slow Money Maine, and the boards of the Farmer Veteran Coalition chapter of Maine, Wolfe’s Neck Farm, and MOFGA Certification Services (organic).
Rob Hurlbut
Principal in Sustainable Agriculture, Equilibrium Capital
Rob is a Principal at Equilibrium Capital and leads Equilibrium’s sustainable agriculture strategies. Rob believes that food is inherently a triple bottom line business, and success in the industry must be measured across all three: Financial, Environmental, and Social. By growing crops that improve the land, we create healthy foods that nourish the body and deliver long-term financial rewards. Rob has over 25 years of experience in the food and agricultural industries, distinguished by his ability to build value through the development of transparent supply chains that deliver on a clear consumer promise. As CEO of Niman Ranch, Rob created the industry’s leading premium meat brand by building a network of over 500 sustainable farmers, constructing a vertical supply chain to capture consumer premiums and return them to the farm. Rob also co-founded his own company, Attune Foods, built on the idea that simple ingredients can deliver great health. Rob has worked at Nestle, managing a strategic business with a big impact on our planet, people and economy, and advised a number of food companies across the US.
Aaron Niederhelman
Managing Director, Entrepreneur Agrarian Fund
As Managing Director of the Entrepreneur Agrarian Fund (EAF), Aaron works with skilled holistic farmers and global thought leaders to promote regenerative agriculture to a broader audience. The EAF utilizes sound ecological farming practice to create profitable regional farm enterprises that best meet growing market demand for better quality food with local provenance. Recently honored as a 2015 Eisenhower Fellow focused on agriculture and food-system reform, Aaron heads to Europe and the Middle East to gain insight from the front-lines of an ever-shrinking-world that has long been concerned with natural resource and water management. Aaron sees great opportunity for the Northeast US to establish a new benchmark for domestic food-systems through promoting environmental and human health as impetus to change the false economy of cheap food. Aaron co-founded and hosts INNOVATEBoston, a think tank event series designed to showcase the best of early stage innovation in New England. Along with hosting ‘Growing Business’, a radio show focused on the business of a better food movement, Aaron participates on numerous non-profit boards ranging from food security to climate change and social responsibility.
Eric O'Brien
Co-Founder and Managing Director, Fall Line Capital
Eric O’Brien is Co-Founder and Managing Director of Fall Line Capital, a private-equity firm focused on farmland and agricultural technology investments. Eric brings over 18 years of professional investment, financial services, and operating experience to the firm. Prior to creating Fall Line with Clay Mitchell in 2011, Eric spent 12 years at Lightspeed Venture Partners, a top tier Silicon Valley venture capital firm with over $3 billion of assets under management. At Lightspeed, he was a Managing Director responsible for early and growth stage investments in technology and services companies in the U.S. and China. Prior to Lightspeed, Eric was an Associate at InterWest Partners, an early-stage venture capital firm where he focused on communications, internet and consumer investments. He has also worked for and consulted to a number of technology startups, and started his career as an Analyst in the mergers and acquisitions and corporate finance groups at Morgan Stanley in New York and San Francisco.
14:20
Big Data for Farm to Table (Sponsored by J-WAFS)
This panel will focus on the tracking of data along the consumption value chain to reduce spoilage and track products from the perspective of food safety and quality. Everyone from distributors to the consumers play an important role in increasing the resiliency of food consumption systems, meaning that the solutions discussed as a part of this panel will focus on circular economy principles from the moment that the food leaves the farm until it arrives on our plates.
Ricky Ashenfelter
Co-Founder, Spoiler Alert
Ricky Ashenfelter is an MBA Candidate at the MIT Sloan School of Management and is a Co-Founder of Spoiler Alert, a food-tech solution to help businesses manage surplus food and organic waste. Started while at MIT, Spoiler Alert creates an online marketplace and SaaS model for finding more optimal outcomes for wasted food. For more info on Spoiler Alert, please visit at www.foodspoileralert.com or tweet @MySpoilerAlert.

Prior to MIT Sloan, Ricky worked in Deloitte’s Sustainability practice, where he led client engagements focused on GHG inventories, sustainability reporting, energy management, supply chain analyses, and emissions reduction strategies within the food and agriculture, retail, and CPG industries. Ricky holds a B.S.B.A. in Finance, Management & Environmental Studies from Georgetown University and will be graduating from MIT Sloan in June 2015.
John Lienhard
Director, Abdul Latif Jameel World Water and Food Security Lab at MIT
During more than 26 years on the MIT faculty, John H. Lienhard V’s research and educational efforts have focused on water purification and desalination, heat and fluid flow, and experimentation. Professor Lienhard received his bachelors and masters degrees in thermal engineering at UCLA from the Chemical, Nuclear, and Thermal Engineering Department, where he worked on thermal instabilities in solar collectors and evaporating meniscus measurements for desalination systems. He joined MIT immediately after completing his PhD in the Applied Mechanics and Engineering Science Department at UC San Diego, where he did experimental work on thermally stratified turbulent flows. Professor Lienhard has created new courses on desalination, on thermal modeling, and on compressible fluid mechanics, as well as directly supervised more than 70 graduate theses and postdoctoral associates. Professor Lienhard is a recipient of the 1988 National Science Foundation Presidential Young Investigator Award, the 1992 SAE Teetor Award, a 1997 R&D 100 Award, and the 2012 ASME Technical Communities Globalization Medal, as well as several teaching awards at MIT. Professor Lienhard has also been is the Director of the Center for Clean Water and Clean Energy at MIT and KFUPM since it was founded in 2008.
Emily Malina
Co-Founder, Spoiler Alert
Emily Malina is an MBA Candidate at the MIT Sloan School of Management and is a Co-Founder of Spoiler Alert, a food-tech solution to help businesses manage surplus food and organic waste. Started while at MIT, Spoiler Alert creates an online marketplace and SaaS model for finding more optimal outcomes for wasted food. For more info on Spoiler Alert, please visit at www.foodspoileralert.com or tweet @MySpoilerAlert.

Prior to MIT, Emily worked as a management consultant and Innovation Fellow at Deloitte, where she specialized in public sector innovation, technology adoption, and change management. She graduated from Emory University, majoring in Psychology and Linguistics and will be graduating from MIT in June 2015.
Katherine Shamraj
Founder and CEO, Foodium
Founder & CEO of Foodium, Katherine is a management consultant-turned-entrepreneur with passionate interests in food and technology, systems thinking, and a triple bottom line approach to doing business. Her venture, Foodium, delivers globally inspired wholesome food to startups and companies that feed their teams great food. Food scientists work alongside dieticians and chefs, meticulously analyzing each ingredient and crafting recipes that are designed to energize and nourish.

Foodium also builds technology prototypes designed to reduce the operational challenges of fresh food production while minimizing both food waste and operating costs. Her vision is to influence demand for fresh, healthful food while growing the supply of convenient, fresh, and minimally processed food.

Katherine inherited a passion for feeding people good food from her grandmother, Stefania, who learned to plant gardens in the spring, pick berries in the summer, forage for mushrooms in the crisp Michigan autumn, and spend the winter in the kitchen concocting elaborate feasts.

She holds a BA from Wellesley College, an MS from Georgetown University and an MBA from MIT Sloan School of Management.
Timothy Swager
John D. MacArthur Professor of Chemistry, MIT
Timothy M. Swager is the John D. MacArthur Professor of Chemistry and the Director of the Deshpande Center for Technological Innovation at MIT. Professor Swager served on the chemistry faculty at the University of Pennsylvania before returning to MIT in 1996 as a Professor of Chemistry and serving as the Head of Chemistry from 2005-2010. He has published more than 375 peer-reviewed papers and has more than 60 issued/pending patents. Swager’s honors include: Election to the National Academy of Sciences, an Honorary Doctorate from Montana State University, the Lemelson-MIT Award for Invention and Innovation, Election to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, The American Chemical Society Award for Creative Invention, The Christopher Columbus Foundation Homeland Security Award, and The Carl S. Marvel Creative Polymer Chemistry Award (ACS). Swager’s research interests include design, synthesis, and study of organic-based electronic, sensory, high-strength, liquid crystalline, and colloid materials. He is the founder of four companies- DyNuPol, Iptyx, PolyJoule, and C­2 Sense- and has served on a number of corporate and government boards.
15:40
Keynote
Mr. Offenheiser will share an NGO perspective on how to collaborate with companies to increase transparency and provide consumers with information on how to make purchasing decisions that promote sustainable food systems and increase food security. He will comment on how we can take the Circular Economy principles we have heard about at the Summit beyond our gathering and into our daily lives.
Ray Offenheiser
President, Oxfam America
Ray Offenheiser joined Oxfam America as its president in 1996. Under his leadership, Oxfam America has grown more than sevenfold, repositioning itself in the US as an influential voice on international development and foreign policy. Oxfam has continued to grow as a strong proponent for food aid reform and food security initiatives, collaborating with governments, corporations, and global institutions on successful campaigns, such as Behind the Brands, to change the way food companies do business. Prior to joining Oxfam, Ray represented the Ford Foundation in Bangladesh and the Andean and Southern Cone regions of South America. He has also directed programs for the Inter-American Foundation in both Brazil and Colombia and worked for Save the Children Federation in Mexico. At the 2012 G Meeting, he was appointed by the Obama administration to represent civil society interests on the Leadership Council of the New Alliance for Food Security and Nutrition in Africa. Ray serves and has served on numerous national and international boards and advisory bodies, including the World Economic Forum, the Clinton Global Initiative, the Council on Foreign Relations, the Aspen Institute, the World Agricultural Forum, and the Gates Foundation.
16:15
Closing remarks
16:30
Ice Cream Social (sponsored by Ben and Jerry's)
Friday 24 April 2015
09:00
READ MORE »
Opening Remarks and Introduction: MIT's Food and Agriculture Focus
09:15
READ MORE »
What is the Circular Economy?
09:30
READ MORE »
Keynote
10:00
READ MORE »
Scaling Resilience Across Production Systems (Sponsored by MIT J-WAFS)
11:00
Coffee Break
11:30
READ MORE »
The Role of Retail in the Circular Economy
12:30
Lunch
13:30
READ MORE »
Technology, Agriculture and Circularity (Sponsored by MIT J-WAFS)
14:50
READ MORE »
Creating Consumption Cascades
16:00
Coffee Break
16:30
READ MORE »
Agriculture and Food Waste in Urban Settings (Sponsored by J-WAFS)
17:15
READ MORE »
Keynote
17:45
Closing
18:00
Networking Happy Hour
19:00
READ MORE »
MIT Waste Research and Innovation Night
Saturday 25 April 2015
09:15
READ MORE »
Opening Remarks and Keynote
09:55
READ MORE »
Closing the Big Loop: Energy and Nutrient Recovery from Waste
READ MORE »
Aquaculture: Transitioning to Sustainable and Diversified Products (Sponsored by Delhaize)
11:15
READ MORE »
Keynote
11:45
READ MORE »
Lunch and Keynote
13:00
READ MORE »
Breaking Down Food Packaging
READ MORE »
New Ventures in the Circular Economy
14:20
READ MORE »
Financing the Transition to Circular Agriculture
READ MORE »
Big Data for Farm to Table (Sponsored by J-WAFS)
15:40
READ MORE »
Keynote
16:15
Closing remarks
16:30
Ice Cream Social (sponsored by Ben and Jerry's)


Session descriptions


Opening Remarks and Introduction: MIT's Food and Agriculture Focus

John Lienhard
DIRECTOR, Abdul Latif Jameel World Water and Food Security Lab at MIT
During more than 26 years on the MIT faculty, John H. Lienhard V’s research and educational efforts have focused on water purification and desalination, heat and fluid flow, and experimentation. Professor Lienhard received his bachelors and masters degrees in thermal engineering at UCLA from the Chemical, Nuclear, and Thermal Engineering Department, where he worked on thermal instabilities in solar collectors and evaporating meniscus measurements for desalination systems. He joined MIT immediately after completing his PhD in the Applied Mechanics and Engineering Science Department at UC San Diego, where he did experimental work on thermally stratified turbulent flows. Professor Lienhard has created new courses on desalination, on thermal modeling, and on compressible fluid mechanics, as well as directly supervised more than 70 graduate theses and postdoctoral associates. Professor Lienhard is a recipient of the 1988 National Science Foundation Presidential Young Investigator Award, the 1992 SAE Teetor Award, a 1997 R&D 100 Award, and the 2012 ASME Technical Communities Globalization Medal, as well as several teaching awards at MIT. Professor Lienhard has also been is the Director of the Center for Clean Water and Clean Energy at MIT and KFUPM since it was founded in 2008.


What is the Circular Economy?

Malaika Thorne
FOUNDER AND CEO, Terracentric Press
As founder and CEO of Terracentric Press, Malaika Thorne develops financial models to implement sustainability initiatives. Malaika earned an MBA from the MIT Sloan School of Management, and a bachelor’s degree from Brown University, where she was a Oettinger National Scholar. Malaika has helped to create new businesses to support the City of San Francisco in its quest for zero waste, launch the City of Portland's curbside compost collection in Oregon, and develop a large, offshore wind power plant in Maine. She has also worked with international leaders and entrepreneurs to guide them in making products from non-traditional materials extracted from municipal solid waste, like food scraps, yard trimmings, textiles, and thin film plastics. Her unique training and perspective have enabled her to develop triple bottom line solutions on four continents. She is a contributor to the books Poor By Design: Why Poverty Persists Despite 60 Years of U.S. Foreign Aid, and The Business of Sustainability: Trends, Policies, Practices, and Stories of Success. In 2012, Malaika was recognized as a TechWomen Mentor by the U.S. State Department.


Keynote

Mr. Bauccio will share insights about how Bon Appetit Management Company has led the restaurant industry in upholding Circular Economy principles that are inclusive of environmental, social, and economic responsibilities across food production and consumption.
Fedele Bauccio
CO-FOUNDER AND CEO, Bon Appetit Management Company
Fedele Bauccio is the co-founder and CEO of Bon Appétit Management Company, which provides food service to corporations, universities, and museums in 32 states. Fedele and Bon Appétit have revolutionized the food service industry both by introducing fresh, made-from-scratch food to the contract market, and by pioneering environmentally and socially responsible practices designed to create a more sustainable food system. Bon Appetit’s Farm to Fork program marked the first of its many commitments to widening that focus to the communities in which we operate, and to the planet itself. Bon Appétit is the first food service company to commit to seafood that meets Seafood Watch sustainability guidelines for commercial buyers, to reducing antibiotic use in farm animals, to switching to rBGH-free milk and cage-free eggs, to tackling food’s role in climate change, and to addressing farmworker rights. In 2012 Bon Appétit announced a comprehensive animal welfare plan, including switching to humanely raised ground beef and to phasing out pork raised with gestation crates by the end of 2015. In November 2014, Fedele won the EY Entrepreneur Of The Year National Retail and Consumer Products Award for redefining the food service industry and pioneering environmental and local sourcing policies.


Scaling Resilience Across Production Systems (Sponsored by MIT J-WAFS)

Resilience is essential for the sustainability of our agricultural system. Crops must endure climatic variation, farms must remain viable businesses, and communities must remain empowered. Biodiverse farming can build this resilience across all production systems, including forestry, farming, grasslands, and aquaculture. This panel will demonstrate how farming techniques such as integrated pest management develop robust farming ecosystems that can yield bountiful harvests and hedge investment risks and how access to genetically diverse crops maintains social systems and food security.
Clay Mitchell
CO-FOUNDER AND MANAGING DIRECTOR, Fall Line Capital
Clay Mitchell is Co-founder and Managing Director of Fall Line Capital, a Silicon Valley-based private equity firm that buys, improves and manages farmland. Fall Line closed its first fund with $125 million of commitments in the spring of 2013. Since 2000, Mitchell has farmed 3,000 acres of corn and soybeans near Waterloo, Iowa. The Mitchell Farm has been a leader in the use of automation in farming operations and has pioneered quality testing of field operations. Mitchell consults to the largest farm in Russia and Ukraine. He is a graduate of Harvard University with a bachelor’s degree in Biomedical Engineering, and of Cornell University with a master’s degree in Crop and Soil Science, where he was a Saltonstall Fellow.


Katlyn Stillings Morris
LECTURER, University of Vermont
Dr. Katlyn Morris is a lecturer in the Environmental Program and the Department of Plant & Soil Science at the University of Vermont. Her dissertation research focused on food security for small-scale coffee farmers in El Salvador, as well as the environmental conservation potential of smallholder agriculture. Dr. Morris co-edited the textbook International Environmental Studies and received her PhD from the University of Vermont in 2012.


John Piotti
PRESIDENT AND CEO, Maine Farmland Trust
Currently President and CEO of Maine Farmland Trust, John Piotti has been at the forefront of agricultural issues in Maine for 20 years. He is the past chair of the Northeast Sustainable Agriculture Working Group (NESAWG) and a past director of the National Campaign for Sustainable Agriculture. John has also served in Maine’s State Legislature, where he chaired the Agriculture Committee and later served as House Majority Leader. In 2005, he was named an Eisenhower Fellow. John holds three degrees from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT): in engineering, public policy, and systems management. John was named by Maine Magazine as one of the 50 people who have done the most for the state.


Ana R. Rios
CLIMATE CHANGE SPECIALIST, Inter-American Development Bank
Ana R. Rios is a Climate Change Specialist at the Inter-American Development Bank. Ana works on the economic analysis of climate change, adaptation on the agricultural sector, mainstreaming of climate change and resilient infrastructure. Her work involves close interaction, dialogue and technical guidance to Ministries and institutions on these topics. She is a co-author of the book "The Climate and Development Challenge for Latin America and the Caribbean: Options for climate-resilient, low-carbon development" and has published several peer reviewed publications. She has been interviewed by CNN, New York Times and Radio France Internationale. Ana obtained a B.S. in agricultural economics and horticulture from Zamorano (2000), and then received a M.S (2003) and Ph.D. (2008) in agricultural economics from Purdue University where she also did postdoctoral research.


The Role of Retail in the Circular Economy

Retailers play an important role in connecting production and consumption of goods. This panel of speakers will focus on how retail stakeholders, such as grocery markets, restaurants, food producers, and more, can individually and collectively create a more circular economy through their supply chains and on-site practices. We will look at innovative business models for returning resources back to these players as well as how retailers interact with consumers to change awareness and behaviors.
Karen Franczyk
GREEN MISSION COORDINATOR FOR THE NORTH ATLANTIC REGION, Whole Foods Market
Karen Franczyk is the Green Mission Coordinator for the North Atlantic region of Whole Foods Market. She has spent most of her career in retail, working a variety of jobs, and only became focused on sustainability when she and her husband decided to become farmers. They bought an organic farm in Winchendon, MA, which they named The Big Red Barn. After a couple years as a CSA, they found their niche selling their organic heirloom tomatoes to Whole Foods Market. This relationship led to Karen deciding to work for Whole Foods Market in June, 2001. She started as a supervisor in the front end, and worked her way up through the stores, spending the last 7 years in Operations as a Store Team leader in both Providence, RI (Waterman St.) and Newton, MA (Four Corners). After 12 years in Operations, Karen moved over to the Store Development Team, where she became the Green Mission Coordinator for the North Atlantic Region. In addition to her career with Whole Foods Market, Karen also spent 3 years on the board of directors for the Northeast Organic Farming Association (NOFA) Mass, two years on a Central Mass Buy Local campaign, and she currently volunteers for a local chapter of Scholarship America.


Tim Greiner
CO-FOUNDER AND MANAGING DIRECTOR, Pure Strategies
Tim Greiner has pioneered approaches to building environmental and social integrity into products, brands, and businesses. His experience spans the spectrum from developing corporate strategy for multinationals, designing product sustainability programs, creating strategies to transform supply chains and fostering collaborative mechanisms to lift the sustainability performance of entire industries. He is currently working with several progressive businesses on deepening their corporate responsibility efforts through product innovation and supply chain engagement. Current and former clients include Annie’s, Walmart, Seventh Generation, The North Face, Stonyfield Farm, EMD Millipore and US EPA.
Tim holds masters’ degrees in Environmental Policy and Business from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and a bachelor’s degree in Materials Science Engineering from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. He is a founding member of the Massachusetts Toxics Use Reduction Planners Association and a former Board member and President. He is also founder of the Cape Ann Climate Change Network and is a Research Associate at the Lowell Center for Sustainable Production. Tim has experience in industry as a Process Engineer for Fairchild Semiconductor. He also worked for the Massachusetts Office of Technical Assistance as Project Director and Chief Engineer.


Namrita Kapur
ENVIRONMENTAL DEFENSE FUND, Managing Director of Corporate Partnerships Program
Namrita Kapur manages EDF's work that focuses on driving positive environmental change through corporate value chains. Drawing from her background in strategy, finance, and international development, Namrita's particular focus is on helping the team develop strategies to accelerate innovation in the corporate sector; exploring opportunities for leveraging capital markets; and, building out our international approach. Namrita leads EDF's collaboration with AT&T, focused on reducing water use in commercial buildings; directly manages our efforts to improve the efficiency of freight in companies; and oversees the work on finance and commodity agriculture, including REDD financing.
Prior to joining Environmental Defense Fund, Namrita played an integral role in establishing the strategy and developing the infrastructure of Root Capital – a social investment fund pioneering finance in rural communities in the developing world. She has previously directed programs for the Environmental League of Massachusetts and Berkshire Natural Resources Council, and worked as a consultant for the United Nations Development Program. She currently serves as Treasurer for the Board of the Environmental League of Massachusetts; and on the Advisory Board of the Sustainability Accounting Standards Board


Britt Lundgren
DIRECTOR OF ORGANIC AND SUSTAINABLE AGRICULTURE , Stonyfield
Britt Lundgren is the Director of Organic and Sustainable Agriculture at Stonyfield Farm. She holds a Master of Science in Agriculture, Food, and Environment from Tufts University. Prior to joining Stonyfield in 2011, Britt spent five years as an agricultural policy specialist for Environmental Defense Fund in Washington, D.C. Together with Stonyfield co-founder and chair Gary Hirshberg and Dr. Charles Benbrook, she is the co-author of Label It Now, a book that makes the case for labeling genetically engineered foods. Britt serves on the boards of the Conservation Law Foundation of New Hampshire and the Sustainable Food Trade Association. She has worked on organic farms in Maine, Massachusetts, and Colorado. She is also an avid fiddle player and member of the New Hampshire-based Hickory Horned Devils.


Technology, Agriculture and Circularity (Sponsored by MIT J-WAFS)

Transitioning to a more circular agriculture system will require a complete re-thinking of how food is produced, with a focus on making this production more sustainable without sacrificing yield. In recent years there has been a surge of technology and data use on the farm that provides a glimpse of how the agriculture system of the future can be more productive as well as environmentally sound. This panel explores the latest developments in crop modeling, precision agriculture and drone technology, with a focus on solutions that can be adopted by farmers at scale. The panelists will discuss the challenges and opportunities of using technology to change the shape of our agriculture system.
Bruno Basso
ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR, Michigan State University
Bruno Basso's research deals mainly with water, carbon, nitrogen cycling and modeling in agro-ecosystems, and spatial analysis of crop yield. Basso's modeling research has focused on extending soil-crop-atmosphere models to spatial domains at the field scale, and in particular on developing, testing, and deploying SALUS, a next-generation process-based model that integrates crop productivity with water, carbon, and nutrient fluxes in a spatially explicit manner. Through this research, it has been possible to integrate the effects of topography and soil properties on soil water balance, and thereby partition surface vs. subsurface flows in different landscape positions. This has important value for better understanding and predicting nitrogen conservation patterns in cropped landscapes as well as soil carbon change - and has led to important insights for the likely effects of climate change on carbon and water footprints of future cropping systems, as noted in recent publications.


Thomas Haun
VP OF STRATEGY AND GLOBALIZATION, PrecisionHawk
Thomas Haun serves as the VP of Strategy and Globalization for PrecisionHawk. Haun is a marketing, sales and business development professional with a decade of experience in building new business opportunities, maximizing financial impact, and identifying maneuvers for global economic trends. With an undergraduate degree in Economics and Mathematics and a Harvard MBA, Haun has spent the last 10 years helping multi-billion dollar companies grow partnerships, increase revenue, and carry out successful new business efforts. From 2005 to 2009, Haun assumed multiple key roles at Northrop Grumman that ultimately led to over $1B in new contracts. Following his move to DuPont/Pioneer in 2011, Haun drove over $80M in additional revenue opportunity by pinpointing agriculture trends, designing a scalable agriculture services business, reducing development time-to-market and maximizing overall financial gain.


Jason Jay
DIRECTOR, MIT Sloan Initiative for Sustainable Business and Society
Jason Jay is Director of the Sustainability Initiative at MIT Sloan. In this capacity, he directs the strategy and implementation of the School’s goals toward including sustainability content in the curriculum for all students, coordinating a vibrant Sustainability Certificate program for qualified Masters’ students, and supporting sustainability related research from all management disciplines. He spearheads the Initiative’s fundraising efforts and engagement with industry and policymakers. Dr. Jay co-teaches the flagship course series Strategies for Sustainable Business and Laboratory for Sustainable Business (S-Lab), teaches executive education programs on sustainability for MIT, and conducts research on hybrid organizations and the pitfalls and pathways of sustainability leadership.


John Rogers
GLOBAL DIRECTOR OF AGRICULTURAL DEVELOPMENT, Anheuser-Busch InBev
John Rogers is the Global Director of Agricultural Development for Anheuser-Busch InBev, where he leads the Global Barley Research organization - a team of global scientists focused on developing new varieties that improve yield, disease resistance and brewing quality in key supply markets. John also heads AB InBev’s SmartBarley program (www.smartbarley.com), a global portfolio of development initiatives dedicated to improving productivity, farm profitability and environmental stewardship through disseminating new technologies and improved practices to farmer suppliers. His teams’ research and development initiatives span AB InBev’s global supply chain, focused on strengthening existing barley supply markets in the Americas and Europe while helping develop new markets in Asia and Africa. John holds an MBA from Harvard Business School and a BS in Mechanical Engineering from NC State University. Based in Leuven, Belgium, John grew up on a cattle farm in western North Carolina.


Molly Toot
SUSTAINTM BRAND MANAGER, United Suppliers Inc.
Molly Toot has lived in central Iowa all of her life and has worked in the agriculture industry for close to 20 years. Currently she manages the SUSTAIN platform for United Suppliers which is a nutrient management strategy for United Suppliers and its locally controlled retailers. As manager of this platform, Molly works with ag retailers to train their agronomy sales teams on the components of SUSTAIN, which includes nutrient management and conservation. In addition to working with the sales teams, Molly is often asked to present SUSTAIN to growers and provide information on the tools and technologies for best management practices specific to nutrient management. Finally, Molly works closely with supply chain partners within their sustainable sourcing regions to help connect them with SUSTAIN ag retailers and ultimately the growers that are using best management practices. Prior to her work at United Suppliers, Molly worked for Land O’Lakes and Syngenta. She graduated from Simpson College with a Marketing Degree and has been pursuing her Masters in AgriBusiness from K-State University.


Creating Consumption Cascades

Biological materials can be "cascaded" through multiple beneficial uses before ultimately returning to the earth for conversion back into raw nutrients. Identifying creative and profitable cascades from food and biomaterials waste is essential to the circular economy. This panel highlights some innovative companies, technologies, and materials that are creating circularity through consumption cascades.
Lydia Baird
CO-FOUNDER, Ego Sum Terra
Lydia Baird is a designer and materials specialist. She is pursuing a Textile Development and Marketing degree at the Fashion Institute of Technology, while also working as a member of the Local 829 Costume Design Union. On campus, she is a member of the Natural Dye Garden and American Association of Textile Colorists and Chemists clubs. Off campus, she volunteers at Earth Matter, a local composting facility.

Through her work as a designer, Lydia experiences first-hand the amount of textile waste in industry. This past fall she co-founded Ego Sum Terra, a student initiative to develop and implement a textile compost system at FIT. Her goal is to manage all the organic waste on campus whether it be food, yarns or finished fabrics through composting and research the impacts of doing so. She hopes to develop a set of standards to introduce the system to other schools and businesses. Prior to FIT, Lydia received a BA in Costume Design and Spanish from Middlebury College in Vermont.


Cheryl Baldwin
VP OF CONSULTING, Pure Strategies
Cheryl Baldwin, Ph.D., is a Vice President of Consulting for Pure Strategies where she partners with corporate clients to develop and execute strategies to improve sustainability performance across food, home and personal care, and cosmetics industries. Cheryl also leads the firms’ global market research to generate new insights to accelerate business transformation.

Cheryl’s recent projects include helping build and implement a proactive approach to antibiotic use and animal welfare in the food supply chain for a major food retailer, assisting with the development of a “net positive” sustainability strategy for a food brand, and facilitating the development of a strategic chemicals management program for a home and personal care company.

Cheryl authored Pure Strategies’ market research report, The Path to Product Sustainability, and the book, The 10 Principles of Food Industry Sustainability (March 2015). She is the lead author/editor for two additional books on sustainability, Sustainability in the Food Industry and Greening Food and Beverage Services and holds U.S. and international patents. Cheryl holds a Ph.D. and M.S. from Cornell University and a B.S. from the University of Illinois, all in Food Science.


Sandy Merkel DeJames
HEAD OF BUSINESS RELATIONS AND DEVELOPMENT, Novozyme
Head of Business Relations and Development, Novozymes Sandra has broad experience in the biotechnology industry, in direct research, early stage commercialization and technology development. She is experienced in identifying new technology applications, integrating next-generation market needs with technology, and strategy development for new market entry across numerous industries, including biopharmaceutical, medical device, food and agriculture. Currently, Sandra is Head of Business Relations and Development, supporting Novozymes global businesses by engaging external stakeholders, building external networks, identifying new opportunities for Novozymes, and securing anchoring of these opportunities.

In her time at Novozymes, Sandra has been responsible for leading global commercialization and market strategy development of next-generation products and technologies in biopharmaceuticals and cell therapy, during which time she played a key role in developing a new therapeutic cell-based technology to address next-generation market needs. She has also been responsible for creating and building new businesses within Novozymes, and expanding Novozymes’ market and technology base, through development of new technology applications and in-licensing new technologies. Prior to her current role, Sandra led the Post-Harvest Preservation platform, focusing on development of microorganisms and microbial-based technologies for use in agriculture and the post-harvest supply chain. Sandra holds a Ph.D. in Biology, and completed her Post-Doctoral training at the UNC School of Medicine.


Sue Van Hook
CHIEF MYCOLOGIST, Ecovative
Sue Van Hook began her affiliation with Ecovative as a mycological consultant at the inception of the company in 2007. Three years later she left her college teaching career in biology and environmental science at Skidmore College to join Ecovative full time. As the Chief Mycologist she procures new fungi from the forests for optimization in Ecovative's plant/fungus biocomposite materials.


Agriculture and Food Waste in Urban Settings (Sponsored by J-WAFS)

This panel will focus on two elements of food systems in cities – how to manage organic waste on a city-wide level, as well as how to produce food in an urban setting. How can we design systems via urban planning or technological advances to help facilitate this loop? How can we educate and incentivize city-dwellers about these opportunities?
Kelliann Blazek
VISITING FELLOW, Harvard Food Law and Policy Clinic
Kelliann Blazek is an attorney and works as a consultant at the Harvard Food Law and Policy Clinic. Her work primarily focuses on tax incentives for food donations and food systems planning. She is a graduate of the University of Wisconsin Law School, where she co-founded the Wisconsin Agricultural and Food Law Society and served as a co-editor of the 2013 Wisconsin Law Review Symposium, themed “Safety and Sustainability in the Era of Food Systems.” During law school, she worked at the Supreme Court of Wisconsin and numerous food law organizations, including Farmers’ Legal Action Group and Farm Commons. Before law school, she received a MA in journalism and worked as a freelance writer for agricultural publications. She also co-authored two publications on organic agriculture while working at the Wisconsin Department of Agriculture, Trade and Consumer Protection. Kelliann’s passion for food law and policy stems from her experience growing up on her family’s farm in rural Wisconsin. She is a licensed member of the State Bar of Wisconsin.


Edith Murnane
FOOD SYSTEMS ADVOCATE AND DIRECTOR OF FOOD INITIATIVES, City of Boston
Edith Murnane was appointed Boston’s first Director of Food Initiatives by Mayor Thomas Menino in July 2010, to help increase access to fresh eats and expand opportunities for urban farming. Murnane, a resident of Jamaica Plain, came to her current role through her work on the Boston Food Council. She also did sales and marketing for the Milk Street Cafe and managed the sustainable food programs for Community Servings – a Jamaica Plain nonprofit that provides home delivered meals to people with life threatening illnesses. Murnane grew up on a 700-acre apple orchard in rural Schoharie, NY. After some years working in corporate events planning, Murnane began her cooking career making oven-roasted Viennese plum tarts and other goodies for sale in farmers’ markets under the label Edith’s Edibles. From 2000-2005, she owned and cooked at The Cantata, a restaurant on Centre Street in Jamaica Plain, known for its extraordinary chili that tempered the bite of chipotle peppers with dark Belgian chocolate. Her education includes a BA in History from Boston University and training at the Cambridge Culinary Institute.


Malaika Thorne
FOUNDER AND CEO, Terracentric Press
As founder and CEO of Terracentric Press, Malaika Thorne develops financial models to implement sustainability initiatives. Malaika earned an MBA from the MIT Sloan School of Management, and a bachelor’s degree from Brown University, where she was a Oettinger National Scholar. Malaika has helped to create new businesses to support the City of San Francisco in its quest for zero waste, launch the City of Portland's curbside compost collection in Oregon, and develop a large, offshore wind power plant in Maine. She has also worked with international leaders and entrepreneurs to guide them in making products from non-traditional materials extracted from municipal solid waste, like food scraps, yard trimmings, textiles, and thin film plastics. Her unique training and perspective have enabled her to develop triple bottom line solutions on four continents. She is a contributor to the books Poor By Design: Why Poverty Persists Despite 60 Years of U.S. Foreign Aid, and The Business of Sustainability: Trends, Policies, Practices, and Stories of Success. In 2012, Malaika was recognized as a TechWomen Mentor by the U.S. State Department.


Keynote

Ken Webster
HEAD OF INNOVATION, Ellen MacArthur Foundation
Ken Webster has an extensive background in economics education, teaching, teacher training
and curriculum development. He writes extensively on the circular economy and its connections with systems thinking. He has been working at the Foundation since the end of 2009 and was a part of its establishment in 2010.


MIT Waste Research and Innovation Night

Interested in seeing some cutting-edge research and start-ups around waste-sector innovations from MIT students, alums, and the surrounding community? MIT Waste Alliance, in collaboration with the Sustainability Summit, invites you to the inaugural MIT Waste Research and Innovation Night! Snacks & refreshments will be provided. If you are interested in exhibiting, please apply here.

Opening Remarks and Keynote

Mr. Matteucci will speak to how private sector capital can help jumpstart Circular Economy businesses with goals to build a food system that can feed 10 billion people.
Paul Matteucci
OPERATING PARTNER, US Venture Capital Partners
At USVP, Paul has led or co-led investments in 3Ware (sold to AMCC), Total Beauty, Trovix (sold to Monster), PlaceIQ, Swoop, and others. He has also served on the board of Homestead (sold to Intuit) and was an Angel Investor in Fra' Mani, a sustainable food producer. During his early tenure at USVP, Paul served as interim CEO of several of the firm's portfolio companies. Paul's current interests on the technology landscape include: internet-based services, data analytics, mobile computing, audience measurement and aggregation, data storage, and rethinking the industrial food system. Paul sees the issue of feeding a growing population without environmental damage as both a major challenge for governments and businesses, as well as an enormous opportunity for creative entrepreneurs. He and his family have founded "Feeding 10 Billion", a non-profit resource center for food system entrepreneurs. He serves as a trustee of the World Affairs Council and is a board member of the University of the Pacific's School of International Studies and of the Business School at Montana State University in Bozeman.


Closing the Big Loop: Energy and Nutrient Recovery from Waste

In a Circular Economy, outputs become inputs. Technological advancements and changes in the perception of waste, however, can help connect waste streams to new processes. Manure can power farms or be transformed into a commodity fuel that flows through pipelines. Human urine, if diverted from traditional wastewater systems, can function as a fertilizer. This panel covers the technologies and infrastructural changes necessary to turn these wastes into resources.
Jon Duschinsky
CEO, The Conversation Farm
Jon is the co-founder and CEO of The Conversation Farm, a global agency that creates business and social solutions by socializing ideas that engage millions of people in conversations. The Conversation Farm’s recent work includes helping global cosmetic firms put social good at the heart of their industry, working with the White House to reframe the conversation on gun control in the US, and putting children in control of the fight against childhood obesity. Jon is also the acting CEO of Oreka Solutions, a sustainable technologies incubator focused on reducing waste, preserving water, and supporting agriculture. Presently, Oreka Solutions is developing an environmentally friendly and cost effective method to turn food waste into animal feed, thereby reducing the amount of natural resources needed to produce feed while also minimizing the amount of food waste sent to landfills. Jon talks to audiences around the world about how to increase their engagement on sustainability issues, sharing speaking platforms with Mikhail Gorbachev, Kofi Annan, and other global leaders. In 2013 The Business of Giving voted Jon the world's second most influential communicator on social innovation- beaten only by Bill Clinton.


Jeremy Goodfellow
VICE PRESIDENT OF ENERGY OPERATIONS, Harvest Power
Mr. Goodfellow has over 15 years of professional experience in the chemical, energy and agriculture industries, currently overseeing Harvest Power’s energy facilities. Harvest Power operates three anaerobic digesters in North America, producing energy and fertilizer from organic waste materials. Prior to his work at Harvest, Mr. Goodfellow reenergized a regional agricultural retail company, supplying crop inputs and innovative solutions to farmers. He has also worked in several start-ups, including building a state-of-the-art biodiesel facility and developing a chemical distribution division.


William Jorgenson
MANAGING PARTNER, Agreen Energy LLC, Bgreen Energy LLC
Mr. Jorgenson has been managing partner of Agreen Energy and Bgreen Energy since their formation in 2008. The companies now have two operating digesters in Rutland, MA that also serve as a case study for the MA Department of Environmental Protection. Mr. Jorgenson provides digester policy expertise to the dairy industry as a member of Dairy Management Inc., the national dairy farmers’ trade association. Prior to his work in digesters, he ran a strategic management consulting group, SJH and Company, and held executive roles in the food and agricultural industry.


John Monaghan
BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT SPECIALIST, Innovation Center for U.S. Dairy
John Monaghan is a business development specialist at the Innovation Center for U.S. Dairy®. The Innovation Center is a forum for the dairy industry to work pre-competitively to address barriers to and opportunities for innovation and sales growth. He is responsible for managing business development activities related to the Innovation Center’s Sustainability Council (a multistakeholder group consisting of 120 organizations from across the dairy value chain), the U.S. Dairy Sustainability Awards program, and a portfolio of strategic partnerships.

Prior to joining the Innovation Center, Monaghan spent time as a legislative specialist for energy and environmental policy at a public policy think tank. He also served as a paralegal specialist in the Wildlife and Marine Resources Section of the U.S. Department of Justice, Environment and Natural Resources Division. He holds a bachelor’s degree in environmental studies from the University of Michigan-Ann Arbor with a specialty in business, law and the environment.


Abe Noe-Hays
RESEARCH DIRECTOR, Rich Earth Institute
Abe Noe-Hays is the Research Director at the Rich Earth Institute, developing and testing practical tools for the collection, treatment, and agricultural reuse of urine. He has been working with dry sanitation systems since 1990. He holds a B.A. in Human Ecology–with concentrations in agroecology and compost science–from the College of the Atlantic, where his interest in recycling human waste led to an
internship at Woods End Research Laboratory and his thesis project, “An Experiment in Thermophilic Composting Toilet Design.” He has operated Full Circle Compost Consulting since 2001, providing complete
design, manufacture, and maintenance services to individuals and institutions with dry toilet systems. He is also the eco-sanitation expert for Sustainable Harvest International, which he has helped to initiate urine-diversion projects in Nicaragua, Honduras, Panama, and Belize.


Aquaculture: Transitioning to Sustainable and Diversified Products (Sponsored by Delhaize)

The technical processes for culturing fish using environmentally friendly methods have existed for many years, but historically the costs have made them economically unfeasible. However, over the past several years the market has seen more and more companies incorporate these processes into their operations. Some companies are even pioneering new ways to convert what were once waste streams into marketable products, which is making aquaculture a more circular system of food production. This panel explores the conditions and processes that have allowed companies to offset the higher costs of sustainable aquaculture, and discuss how aquaculture can contribute to a more circular agriculture system.
Mike Finnegan
CO-FOUNDER, Continental Organics
Mike Finnegan is an environmental lawyer, retired investment banker, entrepreneur and US Army JAG officer. He resides in Garrison, New York with his wife Candace and three children.

After retiring from JP Morgan in 2008, Mike was re-commissioned in the United States Army as a JAG Officer and completed basic training at age 53. He remains the oldest-ever graduate of the Army Basic Officer Leaders Course at Ft. Benning. He continues to serve as a JAG in the 7th Legal Operations Detachment in Albany.
The following year, Mike co-founded Continental Organics, a Sustainable Agriculture Company that uses controlled environment agriculture systems to produce Coho Salmon, Tilapia, over 50 varieties of vegetables, and compost for sale in the Hudson Valley market. The Company has 175,000 sq. ft. of indoor growing facilities and is the largest food producer of its kind in the northeast. It is a certified 8-A “Service Disabled Veteran Owned Small Business” and currently employs 33 people; 60% of whom are veterans.


Bill Martin
PRESIDENT AND CEO, Blue Ridge Aquaculture
Mr. Martin, President and CEO of Blue Ridge Aquaculture, possesses a longstanding successful career in aquaculture. The technical developments that have enabled continuous rearing of fish under high density recirculating conditions without the use of antibiotics, hormones, or genetically modified fish have been refined by Mr. Martin and his staff for more than 20 years. As a result, Blue Ridge Aquaculture has become North America's largest Tilapia producer. Mr. Martin is a member of multiple US aquaculture organizations including the Board for the Center for Environment, Fisheries and Aquaculture Science (CEFAS), where he previously served as Co-Chair, and the National Aquaculture Association (NAA). He serves as Vice-Chair on the Board of Directors for the Southern Regional Aquaculture Association (SRAC) as well as Vice-Chair for the Virginia Marine Products Board. He is also Chairman of the Board, and a Founding Member of the US Aquaculture Coop. Mr. Martin has served as an operational consultant to multiple aquaculture companies where he has evaluated both large and small aquaculture production entities on a global basis in North America, Europe, Asia, Africa, and the Middle East.


Norman McCowan
PRESIDENT AND COO, Bell Aquaculture
Norman McCowan has a passion for fish. This passion has led him to become an industry leader in aquaculture and strive to create the optimal operational structure for sustainability in the industry. Norman has been involved in raising, breeding and marketing fish for more than a decade. With over 16 years of production management experience, Norman was named Operations Manager for Bell Aquaculture in 2007. Norman was responsible for overseeing all production processes at the farm, including raising fish from egg to fry to juvenile to market-size through a scientific and Earth-friendly approach. In May of 2009, Norman was named President & COO. His strong leadership, dedication to excellence and desire to innovate continue to make Bell a leader in sustainable fish farming. In addition, Norman has worked with various universities and industry experts to refine Bell’s processes and identify research opportunities to improve the quality and health of the fish we consume.


Clifford Morris
FOUNDER, Florida Organic Aquaculture
Clifford Morris’ extensive knowledge as an “entrepreneur” with over three decades of experience in financial planning and business development has led to the creation of numerous innovative projects and investment opportunities throughout the U.S., South Africa, and Europe. In his South African homeland, Cliff founded Sirius Financial Navigation, his own Financial Services and Portfolio Fund Management firm.

Moving with his family to South Florida provided Cliff with the opportunity to implement his Sustainable Food Production Strategy. He founded Florida Organic Aquaculture, LLC in Fellsmere, Florida with several million dollars of personal capital at risk. Currently, Florida Organic Aquaculture is the largest bio-secure and environmentally beneficial production facility of this type in the world. The company serves as a model for Cliff’s “triple bottom line; profits, people, planet” sustainable business strategy; offering economic value through increased innovation and capital efficiency, community value through job creation, infrastructure improvements and long-term community enhancements, and environmental value through optimized and integrated systems maximizing resource efficiency. Currently, demand for the company’s fresh, all-natural shrimp is outpacing supply.

In 2011, Cliff established the Florida Aquaculture Foundation, a 501©3 non-profit dedicated to advancing the aquaculture industry and helping individuals achieve economic empowerment through education and training.


Matt Thompson
AQUACULTURE PROJECT LEAD, New England Aquarium
Matt Thompson is the Aquaculture Project Lead for the New England Aquarium Sustainable Seafood Programs (SSP). His role is two-fold: primarily he is responsible for researching and developing reports and recommendations related to aquaculture for the SSP corporate partners, but he also undertakes special projects design to expedite the development and uptake of more sustainable aquaculture practices. He leads the Aquarium’s efforts to improve shrimp farming. Since joining the New England Aquarium in 2007 he has developed expertise in all areas of aquaculture, travelled to multiple aquaculture operations around the world, and authored over 50 sustainability reports across a range of farmed species from numerous countries. Through his participation on technical committees, he has helped promote sustainability criteria in aquaculture certification standards, including the Global Aquaculture Alliance Best Aquaculture Practices (GAA BAP) and the Aquaculture Stewardship Council (ASC). He is a member of the Aquaculture Expert Working Group for the Global Seafood Sustainability Initiative (GSSI), which is working to define a globally recognized benchmarking process for responsible and credible seafood certification. Matt has a bachelor’s degree in marine science from Southampton University in the UK. His aquaculture focus stems from a Master’s degree in aquaculture from Stirling University in Scotland.


Keynote

Dr. Thrupp will leverage her diverse experiences with sustainable agriculture and food systems, both domestically and internationally, to discuss the role that private companies, governments, academia, and others play in the transition to more sustainable and equitable agriculture and food systems.
L. Ann Thrupp
EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR OF THE BERKELEY FOOD INSTITUTE, U.C. Berkeley
Ann Thrupp is the Executive Director of the Berkeley Food Institute, at the University of California, Berkeley, which is aimed to catalyze and support the transformation of food and agriculture systems, to promote sustainability, justice, diversity, resilience and health. Ann has extensive experience in sustainable and organic agriculture and food systems, in the United States and internationally. For over 25 years, she has been a pioneer in this field – actively involved in sustainable approaches to farming and agroecology, through research, education, public service, and in farming and food business. She has held leadership positions in non-profit organizations, government, academia, and as a practitioner and educator in sustainable agriculture, natural resource management, and in social justice. Before beginning her current position at the Berkeley Food Institute, Ann was Manager of Sustainability and Organic Development at Fetzer and Bonterra Vineyards (2003-13). Ann also served as the Managing Director and consultant for the California Sustainable Winegrowing Alliance (CSWA) in 2005-2007. During 1999-2002, Ann worked with the Environmental Protection Agency’s Agriculture Initiative in the Western Region office, and from 1990-1998, she was Director of Sustainable Agriculture at World Resources Institute, working on projects in Latin America and other regions of the world. Ann has over 70 publications, and served on a Scientific Advisory Committee of the CA Department of Food and Agriculture, and on two committees of the National Academy of Science.


Lunch and Keynote

Precious few North Americans have any idea of how much waste they produce, nor where it goes. Out of sight is out of mind, and in the last 50 years our societies have developed intricate constructs to ensure that we don’t have to worry about what we throw away. To get the circular economy truly turning, we have to understand these constructs and get really skilled in knowing how to change them. Just having great technology and production isn’t enough any more. We need to know how to engage people, change attitudes and help reframe the conversation about waste vs resource and what all that really means. Jon Duschinsky will draw on his double experience as a marketing guru and the CEO of one of North America’s most innovative circular economy businesses to challenge your thinking about what we need to do to truly “grow the circle”.
Jon Duschinsky
CEO, The Conversation Farm
Jon is the co-founder and CEO of The Conversation Farm, a global agency that creates business and social solutions by socializing ideas that engage millions of people in conversations. The Conversation Farm’s recent work includes helping global cosmetic firms put social good at the heart of their industry, working with the White House to reframe the conversation on gun control in the US, and putting children in control of the fight against childhood obesity. Jon is also the acting CEO of Oreka Solutions, a sustainable technologies incubator focused on reducing waste, preserving water, and supporting agriculture. Presently, Oreka Solutions is developing an environmentally friendly and cost effective method to turn food waste into animal feed, thereby reducing the amount of natural resources needed to produce feed while also minimizing the amount of food waste sent to landfills. Jon talks to audiences around the world about how to increase their engagement on sustainability issues, sharing speaking platforms with Mikhail Gorbachev, Kofi Annan, and other global leaders. In 2013 The Business of Giving voted Jon the world's second most influential communicator on social innovation- beaten only by Bill Clinton.


Breaking Down Food Packaging

With recent debates focused on preserving freshness to decrease food waste at the expense of increasing synthetic packaging waste, this panel will focus on an important part in revising the food system. To decrease total waste, we will be looking at a range of potential packaging options, including edible packaging, and compostable and bio-derived polymers.

New Ventures in the Circular Economy

The panel's focus will be to highlight start-ups that are actively changing food systems to be more self-sustaining. We will hear from food and agriculture-related start-ups that are operating across the value chain and learn about their successes and challenges, as well as the implications of how they are changing the status quo.
Catherine Fazio
DIRECTOR, Lab for Innovation Science, MIT Innovation Initiative
Catherine Fazio is the Managing Director of the Laboratory for Innovation Science and Policy at the MIT Innovation Initiative. She directs the launch and strategy of this newly-formed research laboratory which studies the factors shaping innovation outcomes and investigates how to accelerate innovation in service to the world. Catherine previously served as a partner at Kirkland & Ellis, LLP. Among other activities, she formulated the strategy and directed operations for multiple, billion dollar arbitrations, served as lead antitrust counsel on a range of multi-national mergers and acquisitions, and counseled clients on risk mitigation strategies. Catherine was also a trial attorney for the Antitrust Division of the U.S. Department of Justice, where she led several significant merger investigations and worked to preserve competition in numerous industries. Catherine serves on the Development Committee for the Atrium School in Watertown, Massachusetts. Catherine received a J.D. from Stanford University, an M.B.A. from the Sloan Fellows Program in Innovation and Global Leadership at MIT, and a B.A. from the University of California, Berkeley.


Igor Kharitonenkov
CO-FOUNDER, Bootstrap Compost
Igor Kharitonenkov is an entrepreneur that specializes in environmental sustainability and business development. Igor graduated from Indiana University with a bachelor's degree in Psychology. After stints in neuroscience and media production, Igor co-founded Bootstrap Compost, where he manages operations, staffing and development for Greater Boston's premier food scrap pickup service. Bootstrap helps thousands of folks aspire to a zero-waste lifestyle at home, at work and beyond. The company is helping to build a cleaner and greener city right here in Boston by reducing waste, creating a valuable resource for local growers in the form of soil amendment, offsetting greenhouse gases through composting and promoting sustainable lifestyles to the public. To date, Bootstrap has helped keep over 700,000 lbs of organic material out of landfills, offsetting the release of over 650,000 lbs of harmful GHGs while creating over 300,000 lbs of soil amendment for the community.


Brad McNamara
CEO AND CO-FOUNDER, Freight Farms
Brad McNamara is the CEO and co-founder of Freight Farms, an agriculture technology company that provides tools for a more sustainable and connected food system. Brad and his co-founder developed their flagship product, the Leafy Green Machine, to allow any business to grow a high-volume of fresh produce in any environment regardless of the climate. He has big expectations for the future, envisioning Freight Farms scattered across the globe making a dramatic impact on how food is produced. Brad has an MBA and Masters in Environmental Science from Clark University. Follow him on twitter at @CarFreeBrad.


Lauren Rathmell
GREENHOUSE DIRECTOR, Lufa Farms
auren Rathmell is a founding member of Lufa Farms and serves as Greenhouse Director, overseeing all farming and plant science activities for the company’s two rooftop greenhouses. Lufa Farms built the world’s first commercial rooftop greenhouse with the vision of changing the way the world eats and creating an ecologically and economically sustainable model for urban farming. Lauren holds a degree in biochemistry from McGill University and is passionate about sustainable growing.


Financing the Transition to Circular Agriculture

Achieving a more circular agriculture system at scale will require private sector involvement in the form of venture capital, private equity and impact investing. This panel brings together experts in sustainable agriculture investing to discuss the unique challenges of funding ventures in agriculture, as well as the financial innovations that are being used to invest in real assets such as farmland. Collectively bringing decades of operational and financial experience in the agriculture sector, panelists will provide an in-depth discussion on the role of finance in a more circular agriculture system.
Gray Harris
DIRECTOR OF SUSTAINABLE AGRICULTURE AND FOOD SYSTEMS, Coastal Enterprises Inc.
Gray supervises CEI’s agriculture and food system program, an integrated value-chain program whose mission is to support the growth of Maine’s sustainable agriculture sector and create access to healthy foods for all people, regardless of income. She is responsible for the management, development, and deployment of Sustainable Agriculture Investment Funds and Healthy Food Finance Initiative Funds. She assesses sector needs and identifies sources of specialized technical assistance and financing for agricultural and food system start-up and expanding businesses; and sources and aligns investment-ready projects with CEI lending and investment staff. Gray is former director of the Maine Farms for the Future program, a statewide business planning and grants program for Maine farmers. She participates in numerous action-oriented agricultural initiatives statewide, such as the Beginning Farmer Resource Network; and serves on the steering committee of Slow Money Maine, and the boards of the Farmer Veteran Coalition chapter of Maine, Wolfe’s Neck Farm, and MOFGA Certification Services (organic).


Rob Hurlbut
PRINCIPAL IN SUSTAINABLE AGRICULTURE, Equilibrium Capital
Rob is a Principal at Equilibrium Capital and leads Equilibrium’s sustainable agriculture strategies. Rob believes that food is inherently a triple bottom line business, and success in the industry must be measured across all three: Financial, Environmental, and Social. By growing crops that improve the land, we create healthy foods that nourish the body and deliver long-term financial rewards. Rob has over 25 years of experience in the food and agricultural industries, distinguished by his ability to build value through the development of transparent supply chains that deliver on a clear consumer promise. As CEO of Niman Ranch, Rob created the industry’s leading premium meat brand by building a network of over 500 sustainable farmers, constructing a vertical supply chain to capture consumer premiums and return them to the farm. Rob also co-founded his own company, Attune Foods, built on the idea that simple ingredients can deliver great health. Rob has worked at Nestle, managing a strategic business with a big impact on our planet, people and economy, and advised a number of food companies across the US.


Aaron Niederhelman
MANAGING DIRECTOR, Entrepreneur Agrarian Fund
As Managing Director of the Entrepreneur Agrarian Fund (EAF), Aaron works with skilled holistic farmers and global thought leaders to promote regenerative agriculture to a broader audience. The EAF utilizes sound ecological farming practice to create profitable regional farm enterprises that best meet growing market demand for better quality food with local provenance. Recently honored as a 2015 Eisenhower Fellow focused on agriculture and food-system reform, Aaron heads to Europe and the Middle East to gain insight from the front-lines of an ever-shrinking-world that has long been concerned with natural resource and water management. Aaron sees great opportunity for the Northeast US to establish a new benchmark for domestic food-systems through promoting environmental and human health as impetus to change the false economy of cheap food. Aaron co-founded and hosts INNOVATEBoston, a think tank event series designed to showcase the best of early stage innovation in New England. Along with hosting ‘Growing Business’, a radio show focused on the business of a better food movement, Aaron participates on numerous non-profit boards ranging from food security to climate change and social responsibility.


Eric O'Brien
CO-FOUNDER AND MANAGING DIRECTOR, Fall Line Capital
Eric O’Brien is Co-Founder and Managing Director of Fall Line Capital, a private-equity firm focused on farmland and agricultural technology investments. Eric brings over 18 years of professional investment, financial services, and operating experience to the firm. Prior to creating Fall Line with Clay Mitchell in 2011, Eric spent 12 years at Lightspeed Venture Partners, a top tier Silicon Valley venture capital firm with over $3 billion of assets under management. At Lightspeed, he was a Managing Director responsible for early and growth stage investments in technology and services companies in the U.S. and China. Prior to Lightspeed, Eric was an Associate at InterWest Partners, an early-stage venture capital firm where he focused on communications, internet and consumer investments. He has also worked for and consulted to a number of technology startups, and started his career as an Analyst in the mergers and acquisitions and corporate finance groups at Morgan Stanley in New York and San Francisco.


Big Data for Farm to Table (Sponsored by J-WAFS)

This panel will focus on the tracking of data along the consumption value chain to reduce spoilage and track products from the perspective of food safety and quality. Everyone from distributors to the consumers play an important role in increasing the resiliency of food consumption systems, meaning that the solutions discussed as a part of this panel will focus on circular economy principles from the moment that the food leaves the farm until it arrives on our plates.
Ricky Ashenfelter
CO-FOUNDER, Spoiler Alert
Ricky Ashenfelter is an MBA Candidate at the MIT Sloan School of Management and is a Co-Founder of Spoiler Alert, a food-tech solution to help businesses manage surplus food and organic waste. Started while at MIT, Spoiler Alert creates an online marketplace and SaaS model for finding more optimal outcomes for wasted food. For more info on Spoiler Alert, please visit at www.foodspoileralert.com or tweet @MySpoilerAlert.

Prior to MIT Sloan, Ricky worked in Deloitte’s Sustainability practice, where he led client engagements focused on GHG inventories, sustainability reporting, energy management, supply chain analyses, and emissions reduction strategies within the food and agriculture, retail, and CPG industries. Ricky holds a B.S.B.A. in Finance, Management & Environmental Studies from Georgetown University and will be graduating from MIT Sloan in June 2015.


John Lienhard
DIRECTOR, Abdul Latif Jameel World Water and Food Security Lab at MIT
During more than 26 years on the MIT faculty, John H. Lienhard V’s research and educational efforts have focused on water purification and desalination, heat and fluid flow, and experimentation. Professor Lienhard received his bachelors and masters degrees in thermal engineering at UCLA from the Chemical, Nuclear, and Thermal Engineering Department, where he worked on thermal instabilities in solar collectors and evaporating meniscus measurements for desalination systems. He joined MIT immediately after completing his PhD in the Applied Mechanics and Engineering Science Department at UC San Diego, where he did experimental work on thermally stratified turbulent flows. Professor Lienhard has created new courses on desalination, on thermal modeling, and on compressible fluid mechanics, as well as directly supervised more than 70 graduate theses and postdoctoral associates. Professor Lienhard is a recipient of the 1988 National Science Foundation Presidential Young Investigator Award, the 1992 SAE Teetor Award, a 1997 R&D 100 Award, and the 2012 ASME Technical Communities Globalization Medal, as well as several teaching awards at MIT. Professor Lienhard has also been is the Director of the Center for Clean Water and Clean Energy at MIT and KFUPM since it was founded in 2008.


Emily Malina
CO-FOUNDER, Spoiler Alert
Emily Malina is an MBA Candidate at the MIT Sloan School of Management and is a Co-Founder of Spoiler Alert, a food-tech solution to help businesses manage surplus food and organic waste. Started while at MIT, Spoiler Alert creates an online marketplace and SaaS model for finding more optimal outcomes for wasted food. For more info on Spoiler Alert, please visit at www.foodspoileralert.com or tweet @MySpoilerAlert.

Prior to MIT, Emily worked as a management consultant and Innovation Fellow at Deloitte, where she specialized in public sector innovation, technology adoption, and change management. She graduated from Emory University, majoring in Psychology and Linguistics and will be graduating from MIT in June 2015.


Katherine Shamraj
FOUNDER AND CEO, Foodium
Founder & CEO of Foodium, Katherine is a management consultant-turned-entrepreneur with passionate interests in food and technology, systems thinking, and a triple bottom line approach to doing business. Her venture, Foodium, delivers globally inspired wholesome food to startups and companies that feed their teams great food. Food scientists work alongside dieticians and chefs, meticulously analyzing each ingredient and crafting recipes that are designed to energize and nourish.

Foodium also builds technology prototypes designed to reduce the operational challenges of fresh food production while minimizing both food waste and operating costs. Her vision is to influence demand for fresh, healthful food while growing the supply of convenient, fresh, and minimally processed food.

Katherine inherited a passion for feeding people good food from her grandmother, Stefania, who learned to plant gardens in the spring, pick berries in the summer, forage for mushrooms in the crisp Michigan autumn, and spend the winter in the kitchen concocting elaborate feasts.

She holds a BA from Wellesley College, an MS from Georgetown University and an MBA from MIT Sloan School of Management.


Timothy Swager
JOHN D. MACARTHUR PROFESSOR OF CHEMISTRY, MIT
Timothy M. Swager is the John D. MacArthur Professor of Chemistry and the Director of the Deshpande Center for Technological Innovation at MIT. Professor Swager served on the chemistry faculty at the University of Pennsylvania before returning to MIT in 1996 as a Professor of Chemistry and serving as the Head of Chemistry from 2005-2010. He has published more than 375 peer-reviewed papers and has more than 60 issued/pending patents. Swager’s honors include: Election to the National Academy of Sciences, an Honorary Doctorate from Montana State University, the Lemelson-MIT Award for Invention and Innovation, Election to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, The American Chemical Society Award for Creative Invention, The Christopher Columbus Foundation Homeland Security Award, and The Carl S. Marvel Creative Polymer Chemistry Award (ACS). Swager’s research interests include design, synthesis, and study of organic-based electronic, sensory, high-strength, liquid crystalline, and colloid materials. He is the founder of four companies- DyNuPol, Iptyx, PolyJoule, and C­2 Sense- and has served on a number of corporate and government boards.


Keynote

Mr. Offenheiser will share an NGO perspective on how to collaborate with companies to increase transparency and provide consumers with information on how to make purchasing decisions that promote sustainable food systems and increase food security. He will comment on how we can take the Circular Economy principles we have heard about at the Summit beyond our gathering and into our daily lives.
Ray Offenheiser
PRESIDENT, Oxfam America
Ray Offenheiser joined Oxfam America as its president in 1996. Under his leadership, Oxfam America has grown more than sevenfold, repositioning itself in the US as an influential voice on international development and foreign policy. Oxfam has continued to grow as a strong proponent for food aid reform and food security initiatives, collaborating with governments, corporations, and global institutions on successful campaigns, such as Behind the Brands, to change the way food companies do business. Prior to joining Oxfam, Ray represented the Ford Foundation in Bangladesh and the Andean and Southern Cone regions of South America. He has also directed programs for the Inter-American Foundation in both Brazil and Colombia and worked for Save the Children Federation in Mexico. At the 2012 G Meeting, he was appointed by the Obama administration to represent civil society interests on the Leadership Council of the New Alliance for Food Security and Nutrition in Africa. Ray serves and has served on numerous national and international boards and advisory bodies, including the World Economic Forum, the Clinton Global Initiative, the Council on Foreign Relations, the Aspen Institute, the World Agricultural Forum, and the Gates Foundation.