Program

Saturday 3 May 2014
08:00
Registration and Breakfast
09:00
Opening Remarks
Julie Newman
Director of Sustainability, MIT
Julie joined MIT as the Institute’s first Director of Sustainability in the summer of 2013. She has worked in the field of sustainable development and campus sustainability for twenty years. Her research has focused on the intersection between decision-making processes and organizational behavior in institutionalizing sustainability into higher education.

In 2004, Julie was recruited to be the founding Director of the Office of Sustainability for Yale University.  At Yale, Julie held a lecturer appointment with the Yale School of Forestry and Environmental Studies where she taught an undergraduate course entitled – Sustainability: From theory to practice in institutions.  Julie came to Yale from the University of New Hampshire, Office of Sustainability Programs (OSP) where she assisted with the development of the program since its inception in 1997.  Prior to her work with the OSP she worked for University Leaders for a Sustainable Future (ULSF). In 2004 Julie co-founded the Northeast Campus Sustainability Consortium, to advance education and action for sustainable development on university campuses in the northeast and maritime region.

Julie lectures and consults for universities both nationally and internationally, participates on a variety of boards and advisory committees and has contributed to a series of edited books and peer reviewed journals. Julie holds a BS in Natural Resource Policy and Management from the University of Michigan; an MS in Environmental Policy and Biology from Tufts University; and a Ph.D. in Natural Resources and Environmental Studies from the University of New Hampshire.
09:15
Introductory Keynote
John E. Fernández
Professor, MIT Department of Architecture
John E. Fernandez is a Professor and member of the Building Technology Program in the Department of Architecture. He has been a member of the faculty since 1999 teaching in the design studio and numerous technology courses including Integrated Building Systems, all department structures courses, construction and materials and various workshops.

His research has been focused on the materials and physical elements and components of the assemblies and systems of buildings. A culminating publication of his research of the past several years is the newly published book, "Material Architecture: emergent materials for innovative buildings and ecological construction." (2005. Architectural Press: Oxford).

Currently, Professor Fernandez is engaged in the articulation of concepts of the ecology of contemporary construction. This effort involves identifying the distinct consumption profile and resource requirement attributes of our existing anthropogenic stock of buildings while formulating design strategies that contribute to reuse and recycling of building materials and components. Accepting the essential tenets of the field of industrial ecology, Fernandez is involved in two primary initiatives intended to bring forth real change in the ways in which material and energy networks are configured toward the making of contemporary buildings.
09:45
Featured Morning Keynote
Nancy Kete
Managing Director, Rockefeller Foundation
Nancy Kete joined the Rockefeller Foundation in January 2012. As Managing Director, Dr. Kete leads the foundation’s global work on resilience including developing strategies and practice for infusing resilience thinking throughout the foundation’s work.

During her 25 year career in government, civil society, and private sector, Dr. Kete brought technical, institutional, and managerial leadership to bear on a number of major environment and societal challenges. She has been a diplomat, a climate change negotiator, a social entrepreneur, and a highly successful fund-raiser.

Before joining the Foundation, Dr. Kete spent thirteen years at the World Resources Institute (WRI), first as Director of the Climate, Energy, and Pollution Program and then as founder and Director of EMBARQ, a distinguished program that catalyzed environmentally sustainable transport solutions to improve quality of life in cities in Mexico, Brazil, India, Turkey and the Andean region.

She also served on President Obama’s National Commission on the BP Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill and Offshore Drilling. In her role as Senior Advisor on Corporate Safety and Risk Management, Dr. Kete provided recommendations on unilateral steps the industry should take to improve safety above and beyond what the regulations would require.

Earlier in her career, Dr. Kete worked for the US Environmental Protection Agency where she led the development of the acid rain control title of the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments, the first and as yet most successful application of market instruments for pollution control.

Dr. Kete holds a PhD in Geography and Environmental Engineering from Johns Hopkins University and a bachelor’s in Geography from Southern Illinois University.
10:30
Coffee Break
10:45
The collaborative city
This panel will discuss how cities enable the collaborative economy. We will look at ways in which new companies, equipped with innovative business models, disrupt traditional notions of urban planning and economic development. While the benefits of increased sharing are clear, we will dig deeper to understand what tradeoffs cities must make in order to accommodate the growing collaborative economy, and what impacts these business have on social and economic equality.
Clara Brenner
CEO and Founder, Tumml
Clara is the co-founder and CEO of Tumml, an urban ventures accelerator. A nonprofit, Tumml’s mission is to empower entrepreneurs to solve urban problems. Clara is responsible for Tumml’s partnership development, marketing, and fundraising.

In January 2014, Forbes listed her as one of its “30 Under 30” for Social Entrepreneurship. Clara has also been named a “Female Founder to Watch” by Women 2.0. Clara’s work energizing urban impact entrepreneurship has been featured in several publications, including Forbes, VentureBeat, Entrepreneur Magazine, and Silicon Valley Business Journal, among others.

Clara has a background in urban real estate and sustainability. She worked as an Associate with WestMill Capital, a real estate investment start-up focused on alternative financing and merchandising mixes authentic to the local area. Notably, she developed and edited content for two WestMill web platforms (Popularise.com and Fundrise.com) to interact with the community about local real estate projects. Prior to WestMill Capital, Clara worked at AECOM, GVA Advantis and Monument Realty. A LEED Accredited Professional, Clara earned her MBA from MIT Sloan and her BA from NYU.
Leigh Hafrey
Senior Lecturer, MIT Sloan
Jordan Sale
Digital Marketing Director, Fundrise
Jordan Sale joined the Fundrise team in early 2014. Jordan leads the company's community engagement and digital marketing efforts as the Fundrise platform expands to cities around the country and democratizes access to real estate investment. A proponent of smart development, especially of mass transit systems, and an advocate against NIMBY-ism, Jordan has a background in urban studies and city planning. Prior to Fundrise, Jordan worked at Blue State Digital, a digital advocacy agency specializing in grassroots, urban mobilization. Jordan was also featured in "Girls Gone Green," a how-to guide for young women looking to effect change and join the growing environmental movement.

Jordan is a graduate of the University of Pennsylvania with a dual major in Communications and Urban Studies.
Molly Turner
Director of Public Policy, Airbnb
Molly Turner is the Director of Public Policy and Civic Partnerships at Airbnb. As an advocate for the Airbnb community Molly handles government affairs for the company, which has a presence in over 35,000 cities worldwide. In this role she manages public-private partnerships with various municipal government agencies, non-profits, and tourism bureaus throughout the world. She also manages research initiatives, such as economic and housing impact studies, and joint studies with academic institutions.

Before Airbnb, Molly consulted with governments on sustainable tourism development and conducted research with the UNESCO World Heritage Center. She currently serves on the boards of SPUR and Tumml. Molly holds a Master in Urban Planning from Harvard University and a BA from Dartmouth College.
10:45
Re-inventing mobility
In developed countries, transportation accounts for approximately 25% of total energy consumption and contributes to one-third of greenhouse gas emissions. The urban transportation system is complex, monolithic, and fragile to the changing climate. As cities struggle to meet the growing travel demand while strengthening their transportation systems’ resiliency, promising innovations have emerged to offer cleaner cars, new mobility options, and incentives for altering travel behaviors. What opportunities and challenges rest in collaboration between the institutional and newer players? Join experts from various organizations in exploring ways to integrate their respective strengths to re-envision and reshape a more sustainable urban mobility.
Thomas Abdallah
Chief Environmental Engineer, MTA NYCT
Thomas Abdallah, P.E. LEED AP, Chief Environmental Engineer for MTA New York City Transit (NYCT). He holds a B.S. in Chemical Engineering from Rutgers University and he is both a Professional Engineer and a LEED® Accredited Professional. Thomas who has been with NYCT since 1987 is MTA NYCT’s prime representative on sustainability issues and he is directly responsible for MTA New York City Transit - Capital Program Management (CPM) department’s ISO 14001 Environmental Management System (EMS) certified since 1999.

As Chief Environmental Engineer since November 2004, Thomas provides expert environmental engineering services to MTA NYCT Capital Program Management Department (CPM) and ensures that all construction projects meet the environmental requirements of all Federal, State and Local regulations, in addition to the appropriate environmental permits, regulatory approvals and/or an Environmental Impact Statements/Assessments for pertinent projects as per environmental regulations such as National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), NY State Environmental Quality Review Act (SEQRA), as well as environmental matters including Water & Soil Quality, Asbestos, Lead, PCB’s, RCRA, and all Hazardous Material removal and disposal for CPM projects.

Thomas is an associate lecturer at Columbia University in the Sustainability Management graduate program. He has appeared in numerous television programs, including, Sundance Channel’s “Big Ideas for a Small Planet,” Discovery’s Science Channel “City 2.0” and PBS “Going Green New York” film documentary. He appeared in a short film documentary “Postcards from the Future” which detailed Hurricane Sandy’s impact on the MTA New York City Transit system with a focus on Climate Change. Thomas Abdallah was interviewed by Scientific American magazine for an article on Climate Change in June 2013.
Ryan Chin
Research Scientist, "Changing Places" Group, MIT Media Lab
Trent Lethco
Principal, Arup
Trent Lethco is a Principal with Arup’s Integrated Planning Group. He has over 15 years of experience and has worked in New York, Boston, Washington DC, Los Angeles, Chicago, and the San Francisco Bay Area. Trent has a strong background in transportation planning, policy, and funding issues. Trent’s primary focus is on effectively linking transportation and land use policy to achieve fiscal, environmental, and social sustainability. He has been involved in a variety of projects for clients in the public sector and has a thorough understanding of local, state, and federal guidelines.
10:45
Waste management—Diversion from Landfills—What's Next?
The Environmental Protection Agency reports that between 1985 and 1995, municipal solid waste recycling increased dramatically.  Since this time, the rate of recycling increase as a percentage of waste generation has leveled.  The Waste Management session brings together experts in organic, can and bottle, and e-waste reuse to discuss the amount of recyclable materials that are being disposed of and explore the innovative ways businesses and regulators are encouraging increased diversion from landfills.  The session will seek to illuminate the future of waste diversion and the business opportunities within it.  Participants will learn about opportunities to capitalize their recycling efforts and the economic and regulatory forces that may shape their waste management behavior in the future.
Johnny Gold
Senior Vice President, Newark Recovery and Recycling, North Eastern Recycled Fibers
Amy Perlmutter
Principal, Perlmutter Associates
Shawn Rosenmoss
Senior Environmental Specialist, San Francisco Department of the Environment
A long-time social justice advocate, Ms. Rosenmoss is currently a Senior Environmental Specialist with the SF Department of the Environment, where she manages Development and Community Partnerships. In addition to raising funds for specific environmental initiatives, she manages the San Francisco Carbon Fund, advises on SF Environment’s grantmaking process, and develops partnerships such Greenstacks, an award-winning collaboration with the City’s 27 Public Libraries. Rosenmoss also oversees programming and exhibits for SF Environment’s EcoCenter, where she works with a range of environmental artists and events.

A former dancer and aerialist, Rosenmoss holds a BS in Electrical Engineering and a Secondary Math Teaching Credential. Prior to joining SF Environment in 2002, Rosenmoss ran a Bay Area circus whose mission was to provide equitable access and use the arts as an avenue for social change. She also worked in San Francisco’s Bayview Hunters Point neighborhood for more than a decade running programs for young adults with barriers to scholastic achievement and employment, as well as creating programs to help foster care youth get into college.

In her private life she is committed to achieving Zero Waste and was a founder of the Compact in early 2006, a group that became (oddly enough) somewhat notorious on right-wing radio for attempting to bring down the American economy buy not buying anything “new”.
Shanker Sahai
Founder and CEO, Greenbean Recycle
11:45
Lunch
13:00
Featured Afternoon Keynote
Aisa Tobing
Senior Advisor to the Governor, City of Jakarta
Aisa Tobing is a City Planner and Senior Advisor to the Governor of Jakarta for International Affairs, and is a special staff member for urban and environmental management for the Climate Mitigation and Adaptation program. She has been attending the C40 Summit since 2005 as a representative from Jakarta and has been appointed as the Chairman of Climate Change Task Force in Jakarta. Aisa has been working in the public sector for the Jakarta Capital City Government since 1977. Before, she held a number of agency positions within the administration, including Director of the Jakarta International Cooperation Bureau, Director of Information Technology in the Communication Management Office, and Head of Environmental Management Division in the Planning Board. She has been involved with the International Network and Organization in Asia Pacific (Citynet). She has also been a lecturer in private universities. Aisa got her first degree in City Planning from Bandung Institute of Technology and her Masters degrees from the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, USA in City Planning and International Development and Appropriate Technology. Her doctoral research at the University of Indonesia is entitled "Climate Mitigation and Urban Growth Management Strategy in Megacities".
13:45
Designing the coastal cities of the future
Thanks to careful planning, coastal cities around the world can leverage the inherently built-in advantage of their prime location. By taking action to increase the desirability of their coastal landscape, they can create opportunities for economic development through tourism, real estate and commercial developments. This panel will examine how to take into account past cases to reach the compromise between economic development and urban resiliency. The panel will explore the current measures to guard against and recover quickly from natural disasters, while promoting vibrant and attractive waterfront neighborhoods in the future.
Terry Bennett
Senior Industry Program Manager, Autodesk
Kian Goh
Partner and Architect, Super-Interesting!
Helen Lochhead
Executive Director, Sydney Harbour Foreshore Authority
13:45
Sustainable Commerce and Logistics in Coastal Cities
Coastal cities have for centuries been hubs of the supply chain and logistic networks that are crucial to human economic activity and development. Major highways, sea- and airports are located in coastal cities, and serve as crucial links in the movement and distribution of goods. As crucial as the role costal cities play in the global supply chain is, there are major challenges to face as coastal cities struggle to balance commerce growth with infrastructure resiliency and environmental concerns. How will the future of supply chain technology address capacity, resiliency, efficiency and environmental concerns in coastal cities? What are current and future trends in supply chain design and what role do coastal cities play in these designs? What are the economic, social and environmental implications of these trends for coastal cities? This session pulls together a multi-disciplinary panel that draws experts from academia, government, and the private sector to explore these ideas. This session will illuminate the coastal city’s role in a sustainable supply chain as well as the challenges to achieving that vision.
Edgar Blanco
Research Director, MIT Center for Transportation & Logistics
Dr. Edgar Blanco is a Research Director at the MIT Center for Transportation & Logistics and is the Executive Director of the MIT SCALE Network in Latin America. His current research focus is the design of environmentally efficient supply chains. He also leads research initiatives on supply chain innovations in emerging markets, logistics operations in megacities and disruptive mobile technologies in value chains.

Dr. Blanco has over thirteen years of experience in designing and improving logistics and supply chain systems, including the application of operations research techniques, statistical methods, GIS technologies and software solutions to deliver significant savings in business operations.

Prior to joining MIT, he was leading the Inventory Optimization practice at Retek (now Oracle Retail). He received his Ph.D. from the School of Industrial and Systems Engineering at the Georgia Institute of Technology. His educational background includes a B.S. and M.S. in Industrial Engineering from Universidad de los Andes (Bogotá, Colombia) and a M.S. in Operations Research from the Georgia Institute of Technology.
Leo Bonanni
CEO and Founder, Sourcemap
Dr. Leonardo Bonanni is the founder and CEO of Sourcemap: the supply chain transparency company. Companies and consumers use Sourcemap.com to see where products come from, including the social, environmental, and financial risks. Powering Sourcemap is a social network for supply chains, so that organizations can connect with thousands of vendors and vendors' vendors to ensure long-term resilience. One day soon you’ll scan a product on a store shelf and be connected to the people who made it.

Leo is one of Businessweek’s “America’s Most Promising Social Entrepreneurs 2012” and Ethisphere’s “100 Most Influential People in Business Ethics” (2011). He teaches sustainability and resilience at Columbia and MIT, has a PhD from the MIT Media Lab; and a background as a designer, and performer. Learn more about Leo on leonardobonanni.com and Sourcemap.
Richard Kelly
Chief Catalyst Officer, Li and Fung Ltd., Hong Kong
Daniel Merayo
Operations Manager, GEFCO
Francois Rey
General Manager, GEFCO
Nestor Roa
Chief of the Transport Division, Infrastructure and Environment Department, InterAmerican Development Bank
13:45
Workshop: CERO—Cooperative Energy, Recycling, and Organics
15:15
Coffee Break
15:30
Infrastructure Financing: What is the value of preventing damage?
Currently, there is a growing discussion about expanding infrastructure for urban resilience. Traditionally, major infrastructure projects have been primarily funded by government institutions, but the private sector is playing an increasingly important role. What Is the business opportunity in these inherently risky regional projects? Leaders in infrastructure investment, climate insurance, and asset management will gather to share their current approach and their expectations of future trends in infrastructure development. In this session we will explore how infrastructure is funded now and in the future and how that could ultimately impact our everyday levels of utility services and costs.
Wallace Ebner
Principal Technical Specialist, AIG
Jason Jay
Director, MIT Sloan Initiative for Sustainable Business and Society
Jason Jay is a Lecturer at the MIT Sloan School of Management and Director of the MIT Sloan Initiative for Sustainable Business and Society. He teaches courses on sustainable business strategy, and gets students and alumni engaged in hands-on projects with leading companies and organizations. His research focuses on cross-sectoral collaboration and hybrid organizations that promote more sustainable business practices, and he leads an MIT-wide Sustainable Societies Research Group. Prior to MIT, Jason was a management consultant for Dialogos International, where he consulted on leadership development and organizational change for major international corporations and NGO's including BP, the World Bank, and the Instituto Libertad y Democracia. Jason holds a Ph.D. in Organization Studies from the MIT Sloan School of Management, and an AB and M.Ed from Harvard University. He lives in Boston, Massachusetts.
Graham Sinclair
Principal, SinCo
15:30
Opportunities by the sea
The sea has always been a vital resource in the context of a global economy, while ensuring the livelihoods of countless coastal communities. With the expansion of global trade and the rise in coastal populations, we now ask more of the sea than ever before. How are traditional coastal industries evolving as new industries establish their footholds, and what systemic strategies exist for managing coastal development? This panel examines from the perspectives of industry players along the coast as well as port regulator / operator with the attempt to find that balance amongst busineses, food production and even the provision of water while protecting our oceanic resources.
Edward C. Anthes-Washburn
Deputy Port Director, Port of New Bedford
Edward C. Anthes-Washburn serves as the Deputy Port Director at the Port of New Bedford, where he focuses on business development, strategic planning, grant management and environmental issues. From January to September, 2012, Ed served as the Acting Port Director at the Port of New Bedford, where he oversaw the signing of the port's first international sister port agreement with Tuxpan, Mexico. Before arriving at the port, Ed worked in port infrastructure development at the Massachusetts Seaport Advisory Council in Fairhaven, Massachusetts. Ed is also a Research Fellow at the Institute for Global Maritime Studies, a non-profit research organization that grew out of the Tufts Fletcher School. He has a city planning background, and has a long-standing interest in maritime studies and the effects of working waterfronts on municipal and regional economies. He received a B.S. in Urban Studies from the College of Architecture Art and Planning at Cornell University and a M.S. in Public Affairs from the University of Massachusetts- Boston. Prior to his work for the Port of New Bedford and Commonwealth of Massachusetts, he was hired by the New Orleans Planning Initiative to help create a comprehensive, resident-driven plan to rebuild the Upper and Lower 9th Ward.
Nicholas Ashford
Professor of Technology and Policy, MIT School of Engineering
Nicholas Ashford is MIT Professor of Technology & Policy. He teaches courses based on his textbooks Technology, Globalization, and Sustainable Development; andEnvironmental Law, Policy, and Economics. He holds both a Ph.D. in Chemistry and a Law Degree from the University of Chicago, where he also received graduate education in Economics. Dr. Ashford is adjunct faculty at the Harvard School of Public Health and also teaches intensive courses in Sustainable Development, and European & International Environmental Law at Cambridge University, UK and at the Cyprus University of Technology. He was a public member and chairman of the National Advisory Committee on Occupational Safety & Health, served on the EPA Science Advisory Board, and was chairman of the Committee on Technology Innovation & Economics of the EPA National Advisory Council for Environmental Policy and Technology.
Michael Velings
Founder and Managing Partner, Aquaspark
Mike is the founder and the driving force behind Aqua-Spark, a global investment fund for sustainable aquaculture, combining a healthy financial profit with environmental and social impact. A lifelong entrepreneur, Mike has spent decades jumpstarting a range of successful businesses. Among other ventures, he co-founded Connexie, which has helped catalyze a professional employment industry across the Netherlands. Mike naturally combines his business background with environmental and social engagement. He understands the potential for business to create durable solutions to complex world problems. With this in mind, Mike founded A-Spark: an investment company that assists entrepreneurs across the globe in realizing their visions of a start-up with a world-changing element. Through A-Spark he has invested in a broad range of ventures over the years– both in the developed and developing world. Mike serves on several boards and is also a member of the Chairman’s Council of Conservation International and an Honorary Global Marine Fellow.
15:30
Workshop: My City Garden / TheMOVE Tour
16:30
Energy resilience for coastal cities
The livelihood of a city depends heavily on its ability to deliver safe and reliable power to the community. The challenge is especially great where coastal cities are concerned. The nuclear disaster in Fukushima, Japan in 2011 and the devastation caused by Hurricane Sandy in 2012 both highlighted how coastal cities are especially fragile. This panel examines where and how resilience can be built into the energy system, and how private and public institutions can create and capture value along the chain. Recognizing that a low-carbon economy is a key solution for mitigating the effects of climate change, panelists will also explore opportunities to drive green development in coastal cities and beyond.
Kerry Cheung
Electrical Engineer, Department of Energy
Kerry recently joined the Power Systems Engineering Research and Development division within the Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability (OE). He currently supports the Smart Grid R&D Program, the Energy Storage Program, and various strategic initiatives across the U.S. Department of Energy enterprise. Prior to his new role, he served as an American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) Science Technology and Policy Fellow (2010-2012) and as an Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) Fellow (2012-2013) working with OE. In this capacity, he contributed to the development of the Department’s first Quadrennial Technology Review, served as a key member of the Grid Tech Team, and was detailed to the Office of U.S. Senator Brian Schatz (D-HI). Kerry holds a B.S. in Applied and Engineering Physics from Cornell University and a M.S. and Ph.D. in Electrical Engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.
Mark Rodgers
Communications Director, Cape Wind
Mark manages Cape Wind’s media relations and generates Cape Wind’s communications content. He has delivered over 300 public presentations on the project to a variety of stakeholder groups over the past 10 years. He is also responsible for managing Cape Wind’s relationships with environmental, labor, health, and trade stakeholders to maximize their involvement. Previously, Mark was a Founder and Director of HealthLink which initiated successful citizen action campaigns to reduce sources of pollution. Mr. Rodgers received a B.A. in Political Science from The George Washington University.
Richard Schmalensee
Howard W. Johnson Professor of Management, Emeritus, MIT Sloan School of Management
Richard Schmalensee is the Howard W. Johnson Professor of Economics and Management, Emeritus at MIT, a member of the MIT Energy Council, and former Director of the MIT Center for Energy and Environmental Policy Research. He served as the John C Head III Dean of the MIT Sloan School of Management from 1998 through 2007. He was the Member of the President's Council of Economic Advisers with primary responsibility for energy and environmental policy from 1989 through 1991. In that capacity, he was involved in the design of the tradable allowance program to deal with acid rain and in the development of climate policy. Professor Schmalensee has published 11 books and more than 120 articles; his work focuses on industrial organization economics and its policy applications. He is a Fellow of the Econometric Society and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and has served as a member of the National Commission on Energy Policy, the Executive Committee of the American Economic Association, and the EPA’s Environmental Economics Advisory Committee. He is a Director of Resources for the Future and the National Bureau of Economic Research.
Kelly Sennatt
Senior Manager of Product Marketing, EnerNOC
16:30
Planning for the new economy
Coastal cities benefit from entrenched economic power but now face new environmental challenges. How can these cities continue to evolve in order to maintain their inherited advantages and be leaders in the new economy? How does the interrelationship of environmental, economic and social challenges transform the way we conceptualize the planning, design, and management of cities? What new economic opportunities can be realized by tackling complex urban problems?
Alexander D'Hooghe
Associate Professor, MIT Center for Advanced Urbanism
Anne Haynes
Founder, Economic and Community Development Ventures
Laurie Zapalac
Ph.D. Candidate, MIT Department of Urban Studies and Planning
Laurie Zapalac is a PhD candidate and the Norman B. Leventhal Fellow in the Department of Urban Studies and Planning at MIT.  She is an urban planner/designer interested in trends impacting urban regeneration, particularly how digital technology is changing the nature of work.  In her dissertation research, she examines why entrepreneurs are tending to prefer historically varied urban districts and what insight this reveals about the relationship between new forms of productivity and specific qualities of the built environment.  Prior to coming to MIT, Laurie led a consulting practice in museum and historic site planning and development, and served as an adjunct faculty member at the University of Texas at Austin in the School of Architecture and the School of Information.  Laurie holds a Master of Science in Architectural Studies from the University of Texas at Austin, and a Bachelor of Architectural History and Bachelor of Science in Archaeology from the University of Virginia.
16:30
Workshop: GHG emissions through computer-aided analysis tools
17:30
Evening Reception
Sunday 4 May 2014
09:30
Registration and Coffee
10:00
Brunch Keynote
Brian Swett
Chief of Environment and Energy, City of Boston
Brian Swett is Chief of Environment, Energy and Open Space for the City of Boston. His Cabinet is comprised of the Inspectional Services Department, the Environment Department, the Parks and Recreational Department, and Boston’s Recycling Program. Mr. Swett serves as the Mayor’s appointee to the boards of the Massachusetts Water Resource Authority (MWRA), Boston Groundwater Trust, Boston Harbor Islands Alliance, and the Boston Harbor Islands Partnership. Mr. Swett also represents the City on the Boston Green Ribbon Commission, the State’s Global Warming Solutions Act’s Implementation Advisory Committee and the State’s Energy Efficiency Advisory Committee.

Over the last year, Chief Swett led a variety of major policy and program initiatives including developing and passing a rental inspection ordinance and a building energy disclosure ordinance, launching Greenovate Boston, a sustainability education and outreach initiative, and kicking off Climate Ready Boston, a set of climate preparedness initiatives focused on Boston’s built and natural environment. Chief Swett is now starting efforts to update the City’s Climate Action Plan, which is due in 2014.
10:30
Implementing Local Change
This panel seeks to provide local context to the global issues of resiliency and opportunity discussed on Day 1 of the conference. Leaders from the City of Boston and Cambridge will shed light on the challenges they face in preparing their jurisdictions for the impacts of climate change. The panel will discuss Boston’s Climate Prepardness Plan, the Complete Streets initiative, and Cambridge’s “Getting to Net Zero Task Force” to understand the unique ways in which our local community is responding to threats of sea-level rise, heat waves, and increases in storm intensity.
Vineet Gupta
Director of Planning, Boston Transportation Department
Vineet Gupta is the Director of Planning at the Boston Transportation Department. Under his leadership Boston has established its Complete Streets initiative, introduced pollution-reducing parking policies and published Access Boston – a citywide vision for transportation. He is currently managing comprehensive plans for emerging growth districts, designing major corridors and implementing new "smart mobility" programs. His work is driven by a robust public process involving advocates, neighborhood groups and public agencies. He has earned both his Master of Architectural Studies and Master of City Planning from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.
Susanne Rasmussen
Director of Environmental and Transportation Planning, City of Cambridge
Susanne Rasmussen is director of the Environmental and Transportation Planning Division in the Cambridge Community Development Department and has more than 20 years of experience in the implementation of environmental policies and programs. She is responsible for the city's efforts to reduce greenhouse gas emissions through the Cities for Climate Protection program and for developing programs to engage residents and business in this effort. She oversees the development of new transportation policies and implementation of a variety of transportation programs and projects such as large multi-modal roadway projects, traffic calming, and transportation demand management. Prior to joining the City of Cambridge Ms. Rasmussen was a senior manager for a non-profit energy service company and a land use planner in a major metropolitan city. Ms. Rasmussen obtained a master's degree in City Planning from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1989 and a master's in Civil Engineering and Planning from the University of Aalborg in Denmark in 1987.
Brian Swett
Chief of Environment and Energy, City of Boston
Brian Swett is Chief of Environment, Energy and Open Space for the City of Boston. His Cabinet is comprised of the Inspectional Services Department, the Environment Department, the Parks and Recreational Department, and Boston’s Recycling Program. Mr. Swett serves as the Mayor’s appointee to the boards of the Massachusetts Water Resource Authority (MWRA), Boston Groundwater Trust, Boston Harbor Islands Alliance, and the Boston Harbor Islands Partnership. Mr. Swett also represents the City on the Boston Green Ribbon Commission, the State’s Global Warming Solutions Act’s Implementation Advisory Committee and the State’s Energy Efficiency Advisory Committee.

Over the last year, Chief Swett led a variety of major policy and program initiatives including developing and passing a rental inspection ordinance and a building energy disclosure ordinance, launching Greenovate Boston, a sustainability education and outreach initiative, and kicking off Climate Ready Boston, a set of climate preparedness initiatives focused on Boston’s built and natural environment. Chief Swett is now starting efforts to update the City’s Climate Action Plan, which is due in 2014.
11:30
Coffee Break
11:45
New England Climate Adaptation Project (Workshop)
The New England Climate Adaptation Project (NECAP) is collaborating with four at-risk coastal New England communities—Barnstable, MA, Cranston, RI, Dover, NH, and Wells, ME—to assess local climate change risks, identify key challenges and opportunities for adaptation, and test the use of role-play simulations as a means to educate the public about climate change threats and to help communities explore ways of decreasing their vulnerability and enhancing their resilience to climate change impacts.

This intensive role-play simulation will engage the Summit audience to actively explore research questions such as: What are the climate change risks facing coastal communities? What can these communities do to manage or adapt to these risks? What will it take to build informed agreements in each community about the appropriate steps to take? How can “playing of tailored role play games” build a shared sense of the collective risk management steps that should be taken?

We anticipate that this workshop will provide valuable insights into techniques for engaging communities in public learning, risk management, and collaborative decision-making. We also hope that participants will be able to build on what we learn as they help their own local communities prepare for climate change.
15:00
Closing presentations and remarks
15:15
Tour of Harpoon Brewery and Sustainability (Optional)
Saturday 3 May 2014
08:00
Registration and Breakfast
09:00
READ MORE »
Opening Remarks
09:15
READ MORE »
Introductory Keynote
09:45
READ MORE »
Featured Morning Keynote
10:30
Coffee Break
10:45
READ MORE »
The collaborative city
READ MORE »
Re-inventing mobility
READ MORE »
Waste management—Diversion from Landfills—What's Next?
11:45
Lunch
13:00
READ MORE »
Featured Afternoon Keynote
13:45
READ MORE »
Designing the coastal cities of the future
READ MORE »
Sustainable Commerce and Logistics in Coastal Cities
Workshop: CERO—Cooperative Energy, Recycling, and Organics
15:15
Coffee Break
15:30
READ MORE »
Infrastructure Financing: What is the value of preventing damage?
READ MORE »
Opportunities by the sea
Workshop: My City Garden / TheMOVE Tour
16:30
READ MORE »
Energy resilience for coastal cities
READ MORE »
Planning for the new economy
Workshop: GHG emissions through computer-aided analysis tools
17:30
Evening Reception
Sunday 4 May 2014
09:30
Registration and Coffee
10:00
READ MORE »
Brunch Keynote
10:30
READ MORE »
Implementing Local Change
11:30
Coffee Break
11:45
READ MORE »
New England Climate Adaptation Project (Workshop)
15:00
Closing presentations and remarks
15:15
Tour of Harpoon Brewery and Sustainability (Optional)


Session descriptions


Opening Remarks

Julie Newman
DIRECTOR OF SUSTAINABILITY, MIT
Julie joined MIT as the Institute’s first Director of Sustainability in the summer of 2013. She has worked in the field of sustainable development and campus sustainability for twenty years. Her research has focused on the intersection between decision-making processes and organizational behavior in institutionalizing sustainability into higher education.

In 2004, Julie was recruited to be the founding Director of the Office of Sustainability for Yale University.  At Yale, Julie held a lecturer appointment with the Yale School of Forestry and Environmental Studies where she taught an undergraduate course entitled – Sustainability: From theory to practice in institutions.  Julie came to Yale from the University of New Hampshire, Office of Sustainability Programs (OSP) where she assisted with the development of the program since its inception in 1997.  Prior to her work with the OSP she worked for University Leaders for a Sustainable Future (ULSF). In 2004 Julie co-founded the Northeast Campus Sustainability Consortium, to advance education and action for sustainable development on university campuses in the northeast and maritime region.

Julie lectures and consults for universities both nationally and internationally, participates on a variety of boards and advisory committees and has contributed to a series of edited books and peer reviewed journals. Julie holds a BS in Natural Resource Policy and Management from the University of Michigan; an MS in Environmental Policy and Biology from Tufts University; and a Ph.D. in Natural Resources and Environmental Studies from the University of New Hampshire.


Introductory Keynote

John E. Fernández
PROFESSOR, MIT Department of Architecture
John E. Fernandez is a Professor and member of the Building Technology Program in the Department of Architecture. He has been a member of the faculty since 1999 teaching in the design studio and numerous technology courses including Integrated Building Systems, all department structures courses, construction and materials and various workshops.

His research has been focused on the materials and physical elements and components of the assemblies and systems of buildings. A culminating publication of his research of the past several years is the newly published book, "Material Architecture: emergent materials for innovative buildings and ecological construction." (2005. Architectural Press: Oxford).

Currently, Professor Fernandez is engaged in the articulation of concepts of the ecology of contemporary construction. This effort involves identifying the distinct consumption profile and resource requirement attributes of our existing anthropogenic stock of buildings while formulating design strategies that contribute to reuse and recycling of building materials and components. Accepting the essential tenets of the field of industrial ecology, Fernandez is involved in two primary initiatives intended to bring forth real change in the ways in which material and energy networks are configured toward the making of contemporary buildings.


Featured Morning Keynote

Nancy Kete
MANAGING DIRECTOR, Rockefeller Foundation
Nancy Kete joined the Rockefeller Foundation in January 2012. As Managing Director, Dr. Kete leads the foundation’s global work on resilience including developing strategies and practice for infusing resilience thinking throughout the foundation’s work.

During her 25 year career in government, civil society, and private sector, Dr. Kete brought technical, institutional, and managerial leadership to bear on a number of major environment and societal challenges. She has been a diplomat, a climate change negotiator, a social entrepreneur, and a highly successful fund-raiser.

Before joining the Foundation, Dr. Kete spent thirteen years at the World Resources Institute (WRI), first as Director of the Climate, Energy, and Pollution Program and then as founder and Director of EMBARQ, a distinguished program that catalyzed environmentally sustainable transport solutions to improve quality of life in cities in Mexico, Brazil, India, Turkey and the Andean region.

She also served on President Obama’s National Commission on the BP Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill and Offshore Drilling. In her role as Senior Advisor on Corporate Safety and Risk Management, Dr. Kete provided recommendations on unilateral steps the industry should take to improve safety above and beyond what the regulations would require.

Earlier in her career, Dr. Kete worked for the US Environmental Protection Agency where she led the development of the acid rain control title of the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments, the first and as yet most successful application of market instruments for pollution control.

Dr. Kete holds a PhD in Geography and Environmental Engineering from Johns Hopkins University and a bachelor’s in Geography from Southern Illinois University.


The collaborative city

This panel will discuss how cities enable the collaborative economy. We will look at ways in which new companies, equipped with innovative business models, disrupt traditional notions of urban planning and economic development. While the benefits of increased sharing are clear, we will dig deeper to understand what tradeoffs cities must make in order to accommodate the growing collaborative economy, and what impacts these business have on social and economic equality.
Clara Brenner
CEO AND FOUNDER, Tumml
Clara is the co-founder and CEO of Tumml, an urban ventures accelerator. A nonprofit, Tumml’s mission is to empower entrepreneurs to solve urban problems. Clara is responsible for Tumml’s partnership development, marketing, and fundraising.

In January 2014, Forbes listed her as one of its “30 Under 30” for Social Entrepreneurship. Clara has also been named a “Female Founder to Watch” by Women 2.0. Clara’s work energizing urban impact entrepreneurship has been featured in several publications, including Forbes, VentureBeat, Entrepreneur Magazine, and Silicon Valley Business Journal, among others.

Clara has a background in urban real estate and sustainability. She worked as an Associate with WestMill Capital, a real estate investment start-up focused on alternative financing and merchandising mixes authentic to the local area. Notably, she developed and edited content for two WestMill web platforms (Popularise.com and Fundrise.com) to interact with the community about local real estate projects. Prior to WestMill Capital, Clara worked at AECOM, GVA Advantis and Monument Realty. A LEED Accredited Professional, Clara earned her MBA from MIT Sloan and her BA from NYU.
Leigh Hafrey
SENIOR LECTURER, MIT Sloan
Jordan Sale
DIGITAL MARKETING DIRECTOR, Fundrise
Jordan Sale joined the Fundrise team in early 2014. Jordan leads the company's community engagement and digital marketing efforts as the Fundrise platform expands to cities around the country and democratizes access to real estate investment. A proponent of smart development, especially of mass transit systems, and an advocate against NIMBY-ism, Jordan has a background in urban studies and city planning. Prior to Fundrise, Jordan worked at Blue State Digital, a digital advocacy agency specializing in grassroots, urban mobilization. Jordan was also featured in "Girls Gone Green," a how-to guide for young women looking to effect change and join the growing environmental movement.

Jordan is a graduate of the University of Pennsylvania with a dual major in Communications and Urban Studies.
Molly Turner
DIRECTOR OF PUBLIC POLICY, Airbnb
Molly Turner is the Director of Public Policy and Civic Partnerships at Airbnb. As an advocate for the Airbnb community Molly handles government affairs for the company, which has a presence in over 35,000 cities worldwide. In this role she manages public-private partnerships with various municipal government agencies, non-profits, and tourism bureaus throughout the world. She also manages research initiatives, such as economic and housing impact studies, and joint studies with academic institutions.

Before Airbnb, Molly consulted with governments on sustainable tourism development and conducted research with the UNESCO World Heritage Center. She currently serves on the boards of SPUR and Tumml. Molly holds a Master in Urban Planning from Harvard University and a BA from Dartmouth College.


Re-inventing mobility

In developed countries, transportation accounts for approximately 25% of total energy consumption and contributes to one-third of greenhouse gas emissions. The urban transportation system is complex, monolithic, and fragile to the changing climate. As cities struggle to meet the growing travel demand while strengthening their transportation systems’ resiliency, promising innovations have emerged to offer cleaner cars, new mobility options, and incentives for altering travel behaviors. What opportunities and challenges rest in collaboration between the institutional and newer players? Join experts from various organizations in exploring ways to integrate their respective strengths to re-envision and reshape a more sustainable urban mobility.
Thomas Abdallah
CHIEF ENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEER, MTA NYCT
Thomas Abdallah, P.E. LEED AP, Chief Environmental Engineer for MTA New York City Transit (NYCT). He holds a B.S. in Chemical Engineering from Rutgers University and he is both a Professional Engineer and a LEED® Accredited Professional. Thomas who has been with NYCT since 1987 is MTA NYCT’s prime representative on sustainability issues and he is directly responsible for MTA New York City Transit - Capital Program Management (CPM) department’s ISO 14001 Environmental Management System (EMS) certified since 1999.

As Chief Environmental Engineer since November 2004, Thomas provides expert environmental engineering services to MTA NYCT Capital Program Management Department (CPM) and ensures that all construction projects meet the environmental requirements of all Federal, State and Local regulations, in addition to the appropriate environmental permits, regulatory approvals and/or an Environmental Impact Statements/Assessments for pertinent projects as per environmental regulations such as National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), NY State Environmental Quality Review Act (SEQRA), as well as environmental matters including Water & Soil Quality, Asbestos, Lead, PCB’s, RCRA, and all Hazardous Material removal and disposal for CPM projects.

Thomas is an associate lecturer at Columbia University in the Sustainability Management graduate program. He has appeared in numerous television programs, including, Sundance Channel’s “Big Ideas for a Small Planet,” Discovery’s Science Channel “City 2.0” and PBS “Going Green New York” film documentary. He appeared in a short film documentary “Postcards from the Future” which detailed Hurricane Sandy’s impact on the MTA New York City Transit system with a focus on Climate Change. Thomas Abdallah was interviewed by Scientific American magazine for an article on Climate Change in June 2013.
Ryan Chin
RESEARCH SCIENTIST, "CHANGING PLACES" GROUP, MIT Media Lab
Trent Lethco
PRINCIPAL, Arup
Trent Lethco is a Principal with Arup’s Integrated Planning Group. He has over 15 years of experience and has worked in New York, Boston, Washington DC, Los Angeles, Chicago, and the San Francisco Bay Area. Trent has a strong background in transportation planning, policy, and funding issues. Trent’s primary focus is on effectively linking transportation and land use policy to achieve fiscal, environmental, and social sustainability. He has been involved in a variety of projects for clients in the public sector and has a thorough understanding of local, state, and federal guidelines.


Waste management—Diversion from Landfills—What's Next?

The Environmental Protection Agency reports that between 1985 and 1995, municipal solid waste recycling increased dramatically.  Since this time, the rate of recycling increase as a percentage of waste generation has leveled.  The Waste Management session brings together experts in organic, can and bottle, and e-waste reuse to discuss the amount of recyclable materials that are being disposed of and explore the innovative ways businesses and regulators are encouraging increased diversion from landfills.  The session will seek to illuminate the future of waste diversion and the business opportunities within it.  Participants will learn about opportunities to capitalize their recycling efforts and the economic and regulatory forces that may shape their waste management behavior in the future.
Johnny Gold
SENIOR VICE PRESIDENT, NEWARK RECOVERY AND RECYCLING, North Eastern Recycled Fibers
Amy Perlmutter
PRINCIPAL, Perlmutter Associates
Shawn Rosenmoss
SENIOR ENVIRONMENTAL SPECIALIST, San Francisco Department of the Environment
A long-time social justice advocate, Ms. Rosenmoss is currently a Senior Environmental Specialist with the SF Department of the Environment, where she manages Development and Community Partnerships. In addition to raising funds for specific environmental initiatives, she manages the San Francisco Carbon Fund, advises on SF Environment’s grantmaking process, and develops partnerships such Greenstacks, an award-winning collaboration with the City’s 27 Public Libraries. Rosenmoss also oversees programming and exhibits for SF Environment’s EcoCenter, where she works with a range of environmental artists and events.

A former dancer and aerialist, Rosenmoss holds a BS in Electrical Engineering and a Secondary Math Teaching Credential. Prior to joining SF Environment in 2002, Rosenmoss ran a Bay Area circus whose mission was to provide equitable access and use the arts as an avenue for social change. She also worked in San Francisco’s Bayview Hunters Point neighborhood for more than a decade running programs for young adults with barriers to scholastic achievement and employment, as well as creating programs to help foster care youth get into college.

In her private life she is committed to achieving Zero Waste and was a founder of the Compact in early 2006, a group that became (oddly enough) somewhat notorious on right-wing radio for attempting to bring down the American economy buy not buying anything “new”.
Shanker Sahai
FOUNDER AND CEO, Greenbean Recycle


Featured Afternoon Keynote

Aisa Tobing
SENIOR ADVISOR TO THE GOVERNOR, City of Jakarta
Aisa Tobing is a City Planner and Senior Advisor to the Governor of Jakarta for International Affairs, and is a special staff member for urban and environmental management for the Climate Mitigation and Adaptation program. She has been attending the C40 Summit since 2005 as a representative from Jakarta and has been appointed as the Chairman of Climate Change Task Force in Jakarta. Aisa has been working in the public sector for the Jakarta Capital City Government since 1977. Before, she held a number of agency positions within the administration, including Director of the Jakarta International Cooperation Bureau, Director of Information Technology in the Communication Management Office, and Head of Environmental Management Division in the Planning Board. She has been involved with the International Network and Organization in Asia Pacific (Citynet). She has also been a lecturer in private universities. Aisa got her first degree in City Planning from Bandung Institute of Technology and her Masters degrees from the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, USA in City Planning and International Development and Appropriate Technology. Her doctoral research at the University of Indonesia is entitled "Climate Mitigation and Urban Growth Management Strategy in Megacities".


Designing the coastal cities of the future

Thanks to careful planning, coastal cities around the world can leverage the inherently built-in advantage of their prime location. By taking action to increase the desirability of their coastal landscape, they can create opportunities for economic development through tourism, real estate and commercial developments. This panel will examine how to take into account past cases to reach the compromise between economic development and urban resiliency. The panel will explore the current measures to guard against and recover quickly from natural disasters, while promoting vibrant and attractive waterfront neighborhoods in the future.
Terry Bennett
SENIOR INDUSTRY PROGRAM MANAGER, Autodesk
Kian Goh
PARTNER AND ARCHITECT, Super-Interesting!
Helen Lochhead
EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR, Sydney Harbour Foreshore Authority


Sustainable Commerce and Logistics in Coastal Cities

Coastal cities have for centuries been hubs of the supply chain and logistic networks that are crucial to human economic activity and development. Major highways, sea- and airports are located in coastal cities, and serve as crucial links in the movement and distribution of goods. As crucial as the role costal cities play in the global supply chain is, there are major challenges to face as coastal cities struggle to balance commerce growth with infrastructure resiliency and environmental concerns. How will the future of supply chain technology address capacity, resiliency, efficiency and environmental concerns in coastal cities? What are current and future trends in supply chain design and what role do coastal cities play in these designs? What are the economic, social and environmental implications of these trends for coastal cities? This session pulls together a multi-disciplinary panel that draws experts from academia, government, and the private sector to explore these ideas. This session will illuminate the coastal city’s role in a sustainable supply chain as well as the challenges to achieving that vision.
Edgar Blanco
RESEARCH DIRECTOR, MIT Center for Transportation & Logistics
Dr. Edgar Blanco is a Research Director at the MIT Center for Transportation & Logistics and is the Executive Director of the MIT SCALE Network in Latin America. His current research focus is the design of environmentally efficient supply chains. He also leads research initiatives on supply chain innovations in emerging markets, logistics operations in megacities and disruptive mobile technologies in value chains.

Dr. Blanco has over thirteen years of experience in designing and improving logistics and supply chain systems, including the application of operations research techniques, statistical methods, GIS technologies and software solutions to deliver significant savings in business operations.

Prior to joining MIT, he was leading the Inventory Optimization practice at Retek (now Oracle Retail). He received his Ph.D. from the School of Industrial and Systems Engineering at the Georgia Institute of Technology. His educational background includes a B.S. and M.S. in Industrial Engineering from Universidad de los Andes (Bogotá, Colombia) and a M.S. in Operations Research from the Georgia Institute of Technology.
Leo Bonanni
CEO AND FOUNDER, Sourcemap
Dr. Leonardo Bonanni is the founder and CEO of Sourcemap: the supply chain transparency company. Companies and consumers use Sourcemap.com to see where products come from, including the social, environmental, and financial risks. Powering Sourcemap is a social network for supply chains, so that organizations can connect with thousands of vendors and vendors' vendors to ensure long-term resilience. One day soon you’ll scan a product on a store shelf and be connected to the people who made it.

Leo is one of Businessweek’s “America’s Most Promising Social Entrepreneurs 2012” and Ethisphere’s “100 Most Influential People in Business Ethics” (2011). He teaches sustainability and resilience at Columbia and MIT, has a PhD from the MIT Media Lab; and a background as a designer, and performer. Learn more about Leo on leonardobonanni.com and Sourcemap.
Richard Kelly
CHIEF CATALYST OFFICER, Li and Fung Ltd., Hong Kong
Daniel Merayo
OPERATIONS MANAGER, GEFCO
Francois Rey
GENERAL MANAGER, GEFCO
Nestor Roa
CHIEF OF THE TRANSPORT DIVISION, Infrastructure and Environment Department, InterAmerican Development Bank


Infrastructure Financing: What is the value of preventing damage?

Currently, there is a growing discussion about expanding infrastructure for urban resilience. Traditionally, major infrastructure projects have been primarily funded by government institutions, but the private sector is playing an increasingly important role. What Is the business opportunity in these inherently risky regional projects? Leaders in infrastructure investment, climate insurance, and asset management will gather to share their current approach and their expectations of future trends in infrastructure development. In this session we will explore how infrastructure is funded now and in the future and how that could ultimately impact our everyday levels of utility services and costs.
Wallace Ebner
PRINCIPAL TECHNICAL SPECIALIST, AIG
Jason Jay
DIRECTOR, MIT Sloan Initiative for Sustainable Business and Society
Jason Jay is a Lecturer at the MIT Sloan School of Management and Director of the MIT Sloan Initiative for Sustainable Business and Society. He teaches courses on sustainable business strategy, and gets students and alumni engaged in hands-on projects with leading companies and organizations. His research focuses on cross-sectoral collaboration and hybrid organizations that promote more sustainable business practices, and he leads an MIT-wide Sustainable Societies Research Group. Prior to MIT, Jason was a management consultant for Dialogos International, where he consulted on leadership development and organizational change for major international corporations and NGO's including BP, the World Bank, and the Instituto Libertad y Democracia. Jason holds a Ph.D. in Organization Studies from the MIT Sloan School of Management, and an AB and M.Ed from Harvard University. He lives in Boston, Massachusetts.
Graham Sinclair
PRINCIPAL, SinCo


Opportunities by the sea

The sea has always been a vital resource in the context of a global economy, while ensuring the livelihoods of countless coastal communities. With the expansion of global trade and the rise in coastal populations, we now ask more of the sea than ever before. How are traditional coastal industries evolving as new industries establish their footholds, and what systemic strategies exist for managing coastal development? This panel examines from the perspectives of industry players along the coast as well as port regulator / operator with the attempt to find that balance amongst busineses, food production and even the provision of water while protecting our oceanic resources.
Edward C. Anthes-Washburn
DEPUTY PORT DIRECTOR, Port of New Bedford
Edward C. Anthes-Washburn serves as the Deputy Port Director at the Port of New Bedford, where he focuses on business development, strategic planning, grant management and environmental issues. From January to September, 2012, Ed served as the Acting Port Director at the Port of New Bedford, where he oversaw the signing of the port's first international sister port agreement with Tuxpan, Mexico. Before arriving at the port, Ed worked in port infrastructure development at the Massachusetts Seaport Advisory Council in Fairhaven, Massachusetts. Ed is also a Research Fellow at the Institute for Global Maritime Studies, a non-profit research organization that grew out of the Tufts Fletcher School. He has a city planning background, and has a long-standing interest in maritime studies and the effects of working waterfronts on municipal and regional economies. He received a B.S. in Urban Studies from the College of Architecture Art and Planning at Cornell University and a M.S. in Public Affairs from the University of Massachusetts- Boston. Prior to his work for the Port of New Bedford and Commonwealth of Massachusetts, he was hired by the New Orleans Planning Initiative to help create a comprehensive, resident-driven plan to rebuild the Upper and Lower 9th Ward.
Nicholas Ashford
PROFESSOR OF TECHNOLOGY AND POLICY, MIT School of Engineering
Nicholas Ashford is MIT Professor of Technology & Policy. He teaches courses based on his textbooks Technology, Globalization, and Sustainable Development; andEnvironmental Law, Policy, and Economics. He holds both a Ph.D. in Chemistry and a Law Degree from the University of Chicago, where he also received graduate education in Economics. Dr. Ashford is adjunct faculty at the Harvard School of Public Health and also teaches intensive courses in Sustainable Development, and European & International Environmental Law at Cambridge University, UK and at the Cyprus University of Technology. He was a public member and chairman of the National Advisory Committee on Occupational Safety & Health, served on the EPA Science Advisory Board, and was chairman of the Committee on Technology Innovation & Economics of the EPA National Advisory Council for Environmental Policy and Technology.
Michael Velings
FOUNDER AND MANAGING PARTNER, Aquaspark
Mike is the founder and the driving force behind Aqua-Spark, a global investment fund for sustainable aquaculture, combining a healthy financial profit with environmental and social impact. A lifelong entrepreneur, Mike has spent decades jumpstarting a range of successful businesses. Among other ventures, he co-founded Connexie, which has helped catalyze a professional employment industry across the Netherlands. Mike naturally combines his business background with environmental and social engagement. He understands the potential for business to create durable solutions to complex world problems. With this in mind, Mike founded A-Spark: an investment company that assists entrepreneurs across the globe in realizing their visions of a start-up with a world-changing element. Through A-Spark he has invested in a broad range of ventures over the years– both in the developed and developing world. Mike serves on several boards and is also a member of the Chairman’s Council of Conservation International and an Honorary Global Marine Fellow.


Energy resilience for coastal cities

The livelihood of a city depends heavily on its ability to deliver safe and reliable power to the community. The challenge is especially great where coastal cities are concerned. The nuclear disaster in Fukushima, Japan in 2011 and the devastation caused by Hurricane Sandy in 2012 both highlighted how coastal cities are especially fragile. This panel examines where and how resilience can be built into the energy system, and how private and public institutions can create and capture value along the chain. Recognizing that a low-carbon economy is a key solution for mitigating the effects of climate change, panelists will also explore opportunities to drive green development in coastal cities and beyond.
Kerry Cheung
ELECTRICAL ENGINEER, Department of Energy
Kerry recently joined the Power Systems Engineering Research and Development division within the Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability (OE). He currently supports the Smart Grid R&D Program, the Energy Storage Program, and various strategic initiatives across the U.S. Department of Energy enterprise. Prior to his new role, he served as an American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) Science Technology and Policy Fellow (2010-2012) and as an Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) Fellow (2012-2013) working with OE. In this capacity, he contributed to the development of the Department’s first Quadrennial Technology Review, served as a key member of the Grid Tech Team, and was detailed to the Office of U.S. Senator Brian Schatz (D-HI). Kerry holds a B.S. in Applied and Engineering Physics from Cornell University and a M.S. and Ph.D. in Electrical Engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.
Mark Rodgers
COMMUNICATIONS DIRECTOR, Cape Wind
Mark manages Cape Wind’s media relations and generates Cape Wind’s communications content. He has delivered over 300 public presentations on the project to a variety of stakeholder groups over the past 10 years. He is also responsible for managing Cape Wind’s relationships with environmental, labor, health, and trade stakeholders to maximize their involvement. Previously, Mark was a Founder and Director of HealthLink which initiated successful citizen action campaigns to reduce sources of pollution. Mr. Rodgers received a B.A. in Political Science from The George Washington University.
Richard Schmalensee
HOWARD W. JOHNSON PROFESSOR OF MANAGEMENT, EMERITUS, MIT Sloan School of Management
Richard Schmalensee is the Howard W. Johnson Professor of Economics and Management, Emeritus at MIT, a member of the MIT Energy Council, and former Director of the MIT Center for Energy and Environmental Policy Research. He served as the John C Head III Dean of the MIT Sloan School of Management from 1998 through 2007. He was the Member of the President's Council of Economic Advisers with primary responsibility for energy and environmental policy from 1989 through 1991. In that capacity, he was involved in the design of the tradable allowance program to deal with acid rain and in the development of climate policy. Professor Schmalensee has published 11 books and more than 120 articles; his work focuses on industrial organization economics and its policy applications. He is a Fellow of the Econometric Society and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and has served as a member of the National Commission on Energy Policy, the Executive Committee of the American Economic Association, and the EPA’s Environmental Economics Advisory Committee. He is a Director of Resources for the Future and the National Bureau of Economic Research.
Kelly Sennatt
SENIOR MANAGER OF PRODUCT MARKETING, EnerNOC


Planning for the new economy

Coastal cities benefit from entrenched economic power but now face new environmental challenges. How can these cities continue to evolve in order to maintain their inherited advantages and be leaders in the new economy? How does the interrelationship of environmental, economic and social challenges transform the way we conceptualize the planning, design, and management of cities? What new economic opportunities can be realized by tackling complex urban problems?
Alexander D'Hooghe
ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR, MIT Center for Advanced Urbanism
Anne Haynes
FOUNDER, Economic and Community Development Ventures
Laurie Zapalac
PH.D. CANDIDATE, MIT Department of Urban Studies and Planning
Laurie Zapalac is a PhD candidate and the Norman B. Leventhal Fellow in the Department of Urban Studies and Planning at MIT.  She is an urban planner/designer interested in trends impacting urban regeneration, particularly how digital technology is changing the nature of work.  In her dissertation research, she examines why entrepreneurs are tending to prefer historically varied urban districts and what insight this reveals about the relationship between new forms of productivity and specific qualities of the built environment.  Prior to coming to MIT, Laurie led a consulting practice in museum and historic site planning and development, and served as an adjunct faculty member at the University of Texas at Austin in the School of Architecture and the School of Information.  Laurie holds a Master of Science in Architectural Studies from the University of Texas at Austin, and a Bachelor of Architectural History and Bachelor of Science in Archaeology from the University of Virginia.


Brunch Keynote

Brian Swett
CHIEF OF ENVIRONMENT AND ENERGY, City of Boston
Brian Swett is Chief of Environment, Energy and Open Space for the City of Boston. His Cabinet is comprised of the Inspectional Services Department, the Environment Department, the Parks and Recreational Department, and Boston’s Recycling Program. Mr. Swett serves as the Mayor’s appointee to the boards of the Massachusetts Water Resource Authority (MWRA), Boston Groundwater Trust, Boston Harbor Islands Alliance, and the Boston Harbor Islands Partnership. Mr. Swett also represents the City on the Boston Green Ribbon Commission, the State’s Global Warming Solutions Act’s Implementation Advisory Committee and the State’s Energy Efficiency Advisory Committee.

Over the last year, Chief Swett led a variety of major policy and program initiatives including developing and passing a rental inspection ordinance and a building energy disclosure ordinance, launching Greenovate Boston, a sustainability education and outreach initiative, and kicking off Climate Ready Boston, a set of climate preparedness initiatives focused on Boston’s built and natural environment. Chief Swett is now starting efforts to update the City’s Climate Action Plan, which is due in 2014.


Implementing Local Change

This panel seeks to provide local context to the global issues of resiliency and opportunity discussed on Day 1 of the conference. Leaders from the City of Boston and Cambridge will shed light on the challenges they face in preparing their jurisdictions for the impacts of climate change. The panel will discuss Boston’s Climate Prepardness Plan, the Complete Streets initiative, and Cambridge’s “Getting to Net Zero Task Force” to understand the unique ways in which our local community is responding to threats of sea-level rise, heat waves, and increases in storm intensity.
Vineet Gupta
DIRECTOR OF PLANNING, Boston Transportation Department
Vineet Gupta is the Director of Planning at the Boston Transportation Department. Under his leadership Boston has established its Complete Streets initiative, introduced pollution-reducing parking policies and published Access Boston – a citywide vision for transportation. He is currently managing comprehensive plans for emerging growth districts, designing major corridors and implementing new "smart mobility" programs. His work is driven by a robust public process involving advocates, neighborhood groups and public agencies. He has earned both his Master of Architectural Studies and Master of City Planning from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.
Susanne Rasmussen
DIRECTOR OF ENVIRONMENTAL AND TRANSPORTATION PLANNING, City of Cambridge
Susanne Rasmussen is director of the Environmental and Transportation Planning Division in the Cambridge Community Development Department and has more than 20 years of experience in the implementation of environmental policies and programs. She is responsible for the city's efforts to reduce greenhouse gas emissions through the Cities for Climate Protection program and for developing programs to engage residents and business in this effort. She oversees the development of new transportation policies and implementation of a variety of transportation programs and projects such as large multi-modal roadway projects, traffic calming, and transportation demand management. Prior to joining the City of Cambridge Ms. Rasmussen was a senior manager for a non-profit energy service company and a land use planner in a major metropolitan city. Ms. Rasmussen obtained a master's degree in City Planning from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1989 and a master's in Civil Engineering and Planning from the University of Aalborg in Denmark in 1987.
Brian Swett
CHIEF OF ENVIRONMENT AND ENERGY, City of Boston
Brian Swett is Chief of Environment, Energy and Open Space for the City of Boston. His Cabinet is comprised of the Inspectional Services Department, the Environment Department, the Parks and Recreational Department, and Boston’s Recycling Program. Mr. Swett serves as the Mayor’s appointee to the boards of the Massachusetts Water Resource Authority (MWRA), Boston Groundwater Trust, Boston Harbor Islands Alliance, and the Boston Harbor Islands Partnership. Mr. Swett also represents the City on the Boston Green Ribbon Commission, the State’s Global Warming Solutions Act’s Implementation Advisory Committee and the State’s Energy Efficiency Advisory Committee.

Over the last year, Chief Swett led a variety of major policy and program initiatives including developing and passing a rental inspection ordinance and a building energy disclosure ordinance, launching Greenovate Boston, a sustainability education and outreach initiative, and kicking off Climate Ready Boston, a set of climate preparedness initiatives focused on Boston’s built and natural environment. Chief Swett is now starting efforts to update the City’s Climate Action Plan, which is due in 2014.


New England Climate Adaptation Project (Workshop)

The New England Climate Adaptation Project (NECAP) is collaborating with four at-risk coastal New England communities—Barnstable, MA, Cranston, RI, Dover, NH, and Wells, ME—to assess local climate change risks, identify key challenges and opportunities for adaptation, and test the use of role-play simulations as a means to educate the public about climate change threats and to help communities explore ways of decreasing their vulnerability and enhancing their resilience to climate change impacts.

This intensive role-play simulation will engage the Summit audience to actively explore research questions such as: What are the climate change risks facing coastal communities? What can these communities do to manage or adapt to these risks? What will it take to build informed agreements in each community about the appropriate steps to take? How can “playing of tailored role play games” build a shared sense of the collective risk management steps that should be taken?

We anticipate that this workshop will provide valuable insights into techniques for engaging communities in public learning, risk management, and collaborative decision-making. We also hope that participants will be able to build on what we learn as they help their own local communities prepare for climate change.