Program

Friday 23 April 2010
08:00
Registration and Breakfast
08:45
Introduction
09:00
Morning Keynote
Dr. John R. Ehrenfeld
Former Executive Director, International Society for Industrial Ecology
Interviewed by Andy Hoffmann, Professor of Sustainable Enterprise, University of Michigan

John Ehrenfeld is one of the leaders and pioneers of sustainability thinking in the world. In his entire career he always put down provocative ideas to push further the boundaries of this field – as shown in his latest book Sustainability by Design. In this interview by Professor Andrew Hoffman, you will learn more about John’s influential ideas, sustainability’s evolving definition and the story and evolution of sustainability in the academic field.
Jim Hanna
Director of Environmental Impact, Starbucks
Jim Hanna joined Starbucks Coffee Company in November 2005, leading initiatives to minimize the company’s environmental footprint through green building, energy conservation, international procurement, waste minimization and collaboration with partner corporations and NGOs. Prior to Starbucks, he served as Director of Environmental Affairs for Xanterra Parks &amp; Resorts at Yellowstone National Park. There Jim oversaw Xanterra’s many progressive environmental initiatives in its operations as the primary concessionaire in the park, including an ISO 14001-certified Environmental Management System. A native of Olympia, Washington, Jim earned a BS in Environmental Sciences from Washington State University and is a U.S. Green Building Council LEED-accredited professional.<br><br>Take a look at Starbucks’ <a href="http://www.starbucks.com/responsibility/global-report">2011 Global Responsibility Report.</a>.
Peter Senge
Senior Lecturer, Organization Studies, MIT Sloan
Peter M. Senge, Ph.D. is a Senior Lecturer at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He is also Founding Chair of SoL, the Society for Organizational Learning, a global community of corporations, researchers, and consultants dedicated to the "interdependent development of people and their institutions."

Peter is the author of the widely acclaimed book, The Fifth Discipline: The Art and Practice of the Learning Organization (1990, revised edition published 2006) and, with colleagues Charlotte Roberts, Rick Ross, Bryan Smith and Art Kleiner, co-author of The Fifth Discipline Fieldbook: Strategies and Tools for Building a Learning Organization (1994) and a fieldbookThe Dance of Change: The Challenges to Sustaining Momentum in Learning Organizations (March, 1999), also co-authored by George Roth. His most recent book, The Necessary Revolution: How individuals and organizations are working together to create a sustainable world, was co-authored with Bryan Smith (Author), Sara Schley (Author), Joe Laur (Author), and Nina Kruschwitz (Author).
09:45
Networking Break
10:05
Agriculture and Innovation
This session will bring together key voices–including farmers, industry, public policy, and academics—from across the US dairy supply chain. Participants will take part in a facilitated, interactive dialogue with the audience about innovative approaches to fostering sustainability in a competitive sector, and will be asked to address both the successes and real challenges of re-thinking sustainability and constructing a future for the New England dairy sector. It will be a space to celebrate progress, and consider the roadmap ahead.
Lynee Bohan
Vice President of Public Relations and Government Affairs, HP Hood LLC
Tim Griffin
Associate Professor, Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy, Tufts University
Asta Schutte
Research Assistant, Tufts University; Agricultural Resource Training Coordinator, New Entry Sustainable Farming Project
Hilde Steffey
Program Director, FarmAid
Ross Thurber
Vermont dairy farmer, Organic Valley
10:05
Life Cycle Strategies
As firms respond to stakeholder concerns about sustainability, they often find that their greatest environmental and socioeconomic impacts are in parts of their value chain outside their direct control. Distant decisions about farming practices, factory labor conditions, and household consumer behavior can create substantial risks and opportunities for businesses in the middle of the chain. Smart companies interested in securing supply, reducing costs, staying ahead of regulation, and enhancing brand and reputation must develop new capabilities: to "see" the larger value-creating systems they are part of creating and understand value chain impacts; to collaboratively engage value chain partners in mutual learning and continuous improvement, especially those who hold different mental models and goals; and to build shared visions of healthy and sustainable value chains and strategically support pre-competitive efforts at systemic change. Without intentional strategies for building diverse leadership networks based on these core capabilities, transformative strategic intentions will never crystallize and get translated into new practices and results.
Randy Kirchain
Associate Professor, MIT Department of Materials Science and Engineering
10:05
Climate Interactive
Climate Interactive developed the C-ROADS simulation to be used with international climate negotiations. The United States Department of State has used the C-ROADS simulator to understand the climate impacts of various country-level proposals and to share that understanding with other parties to the UNFCCC (for example, Deputy Special Envoy Jonathan Pershing presented C-ROADS analysis at the April '09 UNFCCC meeting in Bonn). Participants in this sessions will be split into groups to simulate an actual international climate negotiation. The session will span two breakout time slots and will be run by Professor John Sterman, a developer of the C-ROADS simulation and the author of the book Business Dynamics: Systems Thinking and Modeling for a Complex World.
John Sterman
Jay W. Forrester Professor of Management, MIT Sloan School of Management; Director, MIT's System Dynamics Group
10:05
Role Simulation
Oftentimes when working with other parties disputes arise. These can result from different goals, interests or even styles of dealing with other parties. In this session attendees will negotiate with one another on economic and environmental issues to understand their own dispute resolution styles, how to develop creative solutions, and how to think about tradeoffs. The session will be led by Professor Larry Susskind, a thought leader in the field of negotiation and mediation.
Larry Susskind
Ford Professor of Urban & Environmental Planning, MIT Department of Urban Studies and Planning; Director of the Public Disputes Program & Visiting Professor, Harvard Law School
10:05
Systems Thinking 101
System dynamics is a methodology for studying and managing complex feedback systems, such as one finds in business and other social systems. In fact it has been used to address practically every sort of feedback system. While the word system has been applied to all sorts of situations, feedback is the differentiating descriptor here. Feedback refers to the situation of X affecting Y and Y in turn affecting X perhaps through a chain of causes and effects. One cannot study the link between X and Y and, independently, the link between Y and X and predict how the system will behave. Only the study of the whole system as a feedback system will lead to correct results. (Source: System Dynamics Society) In this session we will give you an overview of systems dynamics, the methodology to use it and discuss some key examples of how system dynamics can improve decision-making around environmental and social issues.
John Lyneis
John Lyneis, PhD candidate in System Dynamics Group, MIT Sloan School of Management
11:35
Lunch
11:55
Afternoon Keynote
Gary Hirshberg
CE-Yo, Stonyfield Farm
Much of the 20th century's social and economic development was built on mythological foundations—for instance:
- The idea that the earth is a subsidiary of our economies–there for the taking and dumping
- The idea that the earth is infinitely resilient to withstand humans' abuses
Even the very fundamental allowance in our economic theories for "externalities" means that often no one is held accountable for the direct consequences of economic activities that do not appear on income statements or balance sheets.

Another myth is that food can be cheap. The problem with this idea is that in fact we now know there are significant nutritional, environmental and social costs incurred in the production of so-called cheap food–we just don't pay them at the supermarket check-out. The net result of businesses and an overall economic system that are founded on myths is that economic success for one party or constituency is always at the expense of another. Someone or something always pays when one party wins.This presentation will examine one company's 28-year effort to address these myths head-on; to seek solutions that internalize externalities to the greatest extent possible and that create Win-Win-Win-Win formulae in which the conditions for all stakeholders—shareholders, employees, farmers, consumers, even livestock—can be enhanced. This is not only about how we can and must THINK differently, but also about proven ACTIONS and RESULTS that can encourage us all to embrace sustainability goals in all that we do.
Karin Ireton
Director of Sustainability Management, Standard Bank
Karin leads the sustainability programme for the Standard Bank, Africa’s largest financial services group, where she guides the incorporation of sustainability principles and thinking into the way the Group conducts business. Focus areas include responsible financing, climate change and energy, environmental and social risk and the communication of sustainability performance and issues to key stakeholders.<br><br>Prior to joining Standard Bank Karin held a similar role at mining giant, Anglo American. She has also previously served as a sustainable energy advisor at Eskom and Manager of the then Industrial Environmental Forum. Karin is active on numerous sustainability advisory boards and chairs the international Stakeholder Council for the Global Reporting Initiative and the IoD’s Sustainable Development Forum. Finally, she is a Trustee of the Endangered Wildlife Trust. Karin holds an MA in International Political Economy from the University of Leeds.
Kook-Hyun Moon
President, New Paradigm Institute
Kook-Hyun Moon is currently the President of New Paradigm Institute.  He was formerly the President and CEO of Yuhan-Kimberly. Yuhan-Kimberly was established as a joint venture between Kimberly-Clark and the Yuhan Corporation in 1970, and is today one of Kimberly-Clark’s largest and most successful subsidiary companies. Mr. Moon earned an MBA from Seoul National University and a BA in English and Business Administration from Hanguk Univ. of Foreign Studies.
12:40
Networking Break
13:00
Closed Loop 101
As more people learn about resource use and waste streams from media like "The Story of Stuff" and Cradle-to-Cradle, they will demand more environmentally friendly goods that use recycled materials and can be broken down to create new inputs for new goods. How does this happen on the ground? What level of coordination among different entities is required to make this happen? In this session we will begin to explore these questions with top-notch firms who are right in the middle of answering these questions.
Scott Chase
Regional & Major Account Resource Manager, Casella
Jim Hanna
Director of Environmental Affairs, Starbucks
John Lively
Director of Environment and Material Science, Preserve
Randi Mail
Recycling Director, City of Cambridge
13:00
Making Globalization Work For All
This session will focus on how to improve working conditions and labor standards in global supply chains. Based upon Richard Locke’s research on the supply chains of Nike, HP, Coca Cola and other global corporations, this session will explore how best one can combine corporate profitability and just labor standards. The connection between different aspects of sustainability (labor justice, environmental stewardship, waste reduction, etc.) will also be discussed.
Richard Locke
Deputy Dean and Alvin J. Siteman Professor of Entrepreneurship, MIT Sloan School of Management
13:00
Sustainability in the Built Environment
How are we developing green and sustainable buildings today? What are the financing and design challenges and how can we integrate them into successful developments? Hear from developers, lenders, and leaders on the public and private side about how development is moving forward while meeting the current challenges of incorporating sustainability in a financially strained world. Ask questions about the future of sustainability in the built environment, and hear where new opportunities may be arising in this field.
James Boyle
President and CEO, Sustainability Roundtable, Inc.
Brian (Tony) Ciochetti
Chairman and Director, MIT Center for Real Estate
John E. Fernández
Professor, MIT Department of Architecture
John E. Fernandez is a Professor and member of the Building Technology Program in the Department of Architecture. He has been a member of the faculty since 1999 teaching in the design studio and numerous technology courses including Integrated Building Systems, all department structures courses, construction and materials and various workshops.

His research has been focused on the materials and physical elements and components of the assemblies and systems of buildings. A culminating publication of his research of the past several years is the newly published book, "Material Architecture: emergent materials for innovative buildings and ecological construction." (2005. Architectural Press: Oxford).

Currently, Professor Fernandez is engaged in the articulation of concepts of the ecology of contemporary construction. This effort involves identifying the distinct consumption profile and resource requirement attributes of our existing anthropogenic stock of buildings while formulating design strategies that contribute to reuse and recycling of building materials and components. Accepting the essential tenets of the field of industrial ecology, Fernandez is involved in two primary initiatives intended to bring forth real change in the ways in which material and energy networks are configured toward the making of contemporary buildings.
Scot Horst
Senior Vice President for LEED, U.S. Green Building Council
As Senior Executive of the U.S. Green Building Council's LEED Program, Scot Horst significantly influences the global course of sustainable design and building performance. Scot brings genuine expertise to helping the built environment intersect with natural systems. His professional experience includes the private and nonprofit sectors as president of both 7group, a leading green building consultancy, and Athena Institute International, a nonprofit dedicated to the life cycle assessment of buildings. Before joining USGBC he chaired the LEED Steering Committee and championed the development of LEED v.3. He was awarded the USGBC Leadership Award for LEED in 2008. Scot sits on the board of the Sustainable Building Alliance in Paris, the Advisory Board of Cradle to Cradle, and the Buildings Retrofit and Finance Steering Committee of the World Economic Forum.
Jim Hunt
Chief of Environmental and Energy Services, City of Boston
Jim Hunt serves on Mayor Thomas Menino’s Cabinet as Chief for Environmental and Energy Services for the City of Boston. In this capacity, Jim Hunt is the Mayor’s lead advisor on environmental and energy policy and oversees several City agencies including the Inspectional Services Department, the Environment Department, Parks Planning, and Boston’s Recycling Program. Jim also serves as a Mayoral Appointee to the Board of Directors of the Massachusetts Water Resources Authority (MWRA) and as a Trustee on the Boston Groundwater Trust. Prior to joining the City, Jim Hunt served as Assistant Secretary for the Commonwealth’s Executive Office of Environmental Affairs (EOEA) and was responsible for administering the Massachusetts Environmental Policy Act (MEPA). Jim Hunt was recently appointed to the Commonwealth’s Climate Protection and Green Economy Advisory Committee, which will advise the Executive Office of Energy and Environment on statewide measures to reduce greenhouse gas emissions.
Jacob Knowles
Director of Sustainable Design, Bard, Rao & Athanas Consulting Engineers LLC
Jacob Knowles is the Director of Sustainable Design at BR+A Consulting Engineers. Here, he manages the sustainability and energy-efficiency agenda for BR+A’s major projects, including healthcare, research and large institutional work. His team of energy analysts and sustainability consultants engage the owner, architect, and in-house engineering team-members in an innovative process to maximize building performance. His work has supported achievement of LEED Gold and Platinum Certification, as well as the MA DOER High Performance Buildings Grant. Jacob has also presented at numerous engagements, including Build Boston, NESEA, and Labs21.
Deborah Morse
Director of Real Estate Development, Boston Housing Authority
Scott Wisdom
Associate Relationship Manager, U.S. Bank's Commercial Real Estate Group
13:00
A Reform Movement at a Crossroads
The Fair Trade foods and beverage category is now fairly well-established and represents over $1 billion in retail sales in the U.S. and is growing at about 20% annually. It has been embraced by small, mission-driven firms, iconic Fortune 500 brands, activists, faith-based groups, and every variety of retailer. It is unusual in the sustainability/CSR movement because its main tool is a certification and labeling system that is focused on the social welfare of the most vulnerable participants in a supply chain.
Rodney North
, Equal Exchange
14:30
Networking Break
14:45
Green Marketing
Many companies are embarking on internal sustainability initiatives ranging from operational improvements such as energy efficiency and waste reduction to changes in product design such as environmentally-friendly packaging and use of recyclable and non-toxic materials. Some companies have woven their sustainability initiatives into their customer-facing message. When does it make sense to market sustainability efforts beyond internal stakeholders such as investors and employees? When does it make sense to hold back that information? How do you ensure that customers do not perceive your marketing messaging as greenwashing? How can customers differentiate between greenwashing and green marketing? This session will focus on what marketers need to know about disclosing sustainability efforts to the general public.
Jim Black
Vice Chairman, Greenguard Environment Institute (GEI)
Michael Hopkins
Editor-in-Chief, MIT Sloan Management Review
Mike Sullivan
Business Development, IBM Big Green Innovations
David Wilcox
Founder, ReachScale
14:45
Ideavation
Sustainability may seem like a straightforward concept, but the concept of a sustainable world within the context of our current reality is hard to wrap our minds around. At times the problem is not how to overcome obstacles that prevent a more sustainable way of living, but imagining what a sustainable world will look like in the first place. We will need truly innovative solutions to shift our habitual dependence on old ways of Industrial Age life.

One approach to breakthrough innovations is open source systems. For example, free software distributed and continuously developed by online communities, information and data organized by a collective group, or competitions in which ideas and solutions are crowdsourced from the public. How can open source systems be used to solve the hard yet unavoidable problems we face in preserving our planet? More importantly, how can the open source approach lead to innovative solutions in sustainability and new ways of 21st Century life?
Eric von Hippel
Professor of Technological Innovation, MIT Sloan School of Management
Robert Laubacher
Research Associate, MIT Sloan School of Management
14:45
Individual Action
Leveraging individual behavior to address sustainability concerns is potentially the fastest and cheapest way to create lasting societal change. Case studies, particularly in the energy sector, have shown that by complementing technological, political and economic action with behavioral theory, organizations can create in deeper systemic transformations. To achieve this change, harnessing the power of individual action is crucial, but developing and distributing effective messaging to motivate action can be a daunting challenge. The interactions between individuals, messages, and media are many, complex, and in high competition for everyone's attention. Therefore, the drivers and motivators of any audience provides the fundamental building blocks of successful behavior change strategy.

This workshop will introduce participants to some of the primary drivers and motivators behind people's actions. Through a combination of small-group activities and larger discussions, the following questions will be addressed.
- How can behavior change strategy improve sustainability communications?
- What tools exist to understand and influence behavior change?
- How does behavior change fit into the larger picture of sustainable development?
Rebecca Dahl
Graduate student in Strategic Leadership towards Sustainability, Blekinge Institute of Technology
Steve Marshall
Graduate student in Strategic Leadership towards Sustainability, Blekinge Institute of Technology
Adam Siegel
Sustainability Consultant, Cause Consulting
14:45
Local Economy
Some say local is the new green. From a pure supply chain perspective, that may be true. However, local means much more, from community development and civic engagement to job creation and environmental stewardship. This panel consists of Cambridge/Somerville community stakeholders including a local business owner, a local politician, a local community organizer, and a local media representative. This discussion will address what it means to be local, why we should be local, and how local communities can promote sustainability.
David Day
Arts and Entertainment Editor, Boston's Weekly Dig
Rebekah Gewirtz
Ward 6 Alderman, City of Somerville
Joe Grafton
Executive Director, Somerville Local First
Christina Ingersoll
MBA Candidate, MIT Sloan School of Management
Michael Kanter
Co-owner and Chief Visionary Officer, Cambridge Naturals
14:45
ESG Investing
Many investors today are demanding much more from their investments than just financial return. Investors have become increasingly interested in maximizing social good without sacrificing portfolio diversification or financial performance. Investment strategies range from screening out companies that engage in questionable practices to proactively investing in companies that consistently promote environmental stewardship, social justice, and good corporate governance. According to Ceres, a national network of investors and environmental groups, long-term investors see sustainability performance as an indicator of strong management and long-term strategy for future growth. In other words, many investors are starting to see social investments as good business opportunities.

How do players in the social investment space effectively engage with key stakeholders such as sustainable companies, investors, competitors, social and environmental groups, local communities, and others benefiting from the investments? How do you increase transparency to ensure that the social investments are truly making a difference for all key stakeholders? In this session, we will explore these questions and have a discussion on how we, as a society, might prioritize our investments to maximize both positive social impact and financial return.
Karin Chamberlain
Index Manager, FTSE KLD Indexes (division of RiskMetrics Group)
Miguel Granier
Founder/Director, Invested Development
Kirk Hourdajian
Project Manager of Corporate Partnerships, Environmental Defense Fund
Alla Jezmir
Principal, Green Portfolio, Calvert Foundation
16:15
Coffee/Networking Break
16:45
Evening Keynote
Mindy Lubber
President, Ceres
Mindy S. Lubber is President of Ceres, the leading coalition of investors, environmental organizations and other public interest groups working with companies and investors to build sustainability into the capital markets and address sustainability challenges such as global climate change. She also directs the Investor Network on Climate Risk (INCR), a network of more than 80 institutional investors representing over $8 trillion in assets that coordinates U.S. investor responses to the financial risks and opportunities posed by climate change.
17:30
Reception
Friday 23 April 2010
08:00
Registration and Breakfast
08:45
Introduction
09:00
READ MORE »
Morning Keynote
09:45
Networking Break
10:05
READ MORE »
Agriculture and Innovation
READ MORE »
Life Cycle Strategies
READ MORE »
Climate Interactive
READ MORE »
Role Simulation
READ MORE »
Systems Thinking 101
11:35
Lunch
11:55
READ MORE »
Afternoon Keynote
12:40
Networking Break
13:00
READ MORE »
Closed Loop 101
READ MORE »
Making Globalization Work For All
READ MORE »
Sustainability in the Built Environment
READ MORE »
A Reform Movement at a Crossroads
14:30
Networking Break
14:45
READ MORE »
Green Marketing
READ MORE »
Ideavation
READ MORE »
Individual Action
READ MORE »
Local Economy
READ MORE »
ESG Investing
16:15
Coffee/Networking Break
16:45
READ MORE »
Evening Keynote
17:30
Reception


Session descriptions


Morning Keynote

Dr. John R. Ehrenfeld
FORMER EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR, International Society for Industrial Ecology
Interviewed by Andy Hoffmann, Professor of Sustainable Enterprise, University of Michigan

John Ehrenfeld is one of the leaders and pioneers of sustainability thinking in the world. In his entire career he always put down provocative ideas to push further the boundaries of this field – as shown in his latest book Sustainability by Design. In this interview by Professor Andrew Hoffman, you will learn more about John’s influential ideas, sustainability’s evolving definition and the story and evolution of sustainability in the academic field.
Jim Hanna
DIRECTOR OF ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT, Starbucks
Jim Hanna joined Starbucks Coffee Company in November 2005, leading initiatives to minimize the company’s environmental footprint through green building, energy conservation, international procurement, waste minimization and collaboration with partner corporations and NGOs. Prior to Starbucks, he served as Director of Environmental Affairs for Xanterra Parks &amp; Resorts at Yellowstone National Park. There Jim oversaw Xanterra’s many progressive environmental initiatives in its operations as the primary concessionaire in the park, including an ISO 14001-certified Environmental Management System. A native of Olympia, Washington, Jim earned a BS in Environmental Sciences from Washington State University and is a U.S. Green Building Council LEED-accredited professional.<br><br>Take a look at Starbucks’ <a href="http://www.starbucks.com/responsibility/global-report">2011 Global Responsibility Report.</a>.
Peter Senge
SENIOR LECTURER, Organization Studies, MIT Sloan
Peter M. Senge, Ph.D. is a Senior Lecturer at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He is also Founding Chair of SoL, the Society for Organizational Learning, a global community of corporations, researchers, and consultants dedicated to the "interdependent development of people and their institutions."

Peter is the author of the widely acclaimed book, The Fifth Discipline: The Art and Practice of the Learning Organization (1990, revised edition published 2006) and, with colleagues Charlotte Roberts, Rick Ross, Bryan Smith and Art Kleiner, co-author of The Fifth Discipline Fieldbook: Strategies and Tools for Building a Learning Organization (1994) and a fieldbookThe Dance of Change: The Challenges to Sustaining Momentum in Learning Organizations (March, 1999), also co-authored by George Roth. His most recent book, The Necessary Revolution: How individuals and organizations are working together to create a sustainable world, was co-authored with Bryan Smith (Author), Sara Schley (Author), Joe Laur (Author), and Nina Kruschwitz (Author).


Agriculture and Innovation

This session will bring together key voices–including farmers, industry, public policy, and academics—from across the US dairy supply chain. Participants will take part in a facilitated, interactive dialogue with the audience about innovative approaches to fostering sustainability in a competitive sector, and will be asked to address both the successes and real challenges of re-thinking sustainability and constructing a future for the New England dairy sector. It will be a space to celebrate progress, and consider the roadmap ahead.
Lynee Bohan
VICE PRESIDENT OF PUBLIC RELATIONS AND GOVERNMENT AFFAIRS, HP Hood LLC
Tim Griffin
ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR, Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy, Tufts University
Asta Schutte
RESEARCH ASSISTANT, Tufts University; Agricultural Resource Training Coordinator, New Entry Sustainable Farming Project
Hilde Steffey
PROGRAM DIRECTOR, FarmAid
Ross Thurber
VERMONT DAIRY FARMER, Organic Valley


Life Cycle Strategies

As firms respond to stakeholder concerns about sustainability, they often find that their greatest environmental and socioeconomic impacts are in parts of their value chain outside their direct control. Distant decisions about farming practices, factory labor conditions, and household consumer behavior can create substantial risks and opportunities for businesses in the middle of the chain. Smart companies interested in securing supply, reducing costs, staying ahead of regulation, and enhancing brand and reputation must develop new capabilities: to "see" the larger value-creating systems they are part of creating and understand value chain impacts; to collaboratively engage value chain partners in mutual learning and continuous improvement, especially those who hold different mental models and goals; and to build shared visions of healthy and sustainable value chains and strategically support pre-competitive efforts at systemic change. Without intentional strategies for building diverse leadership networks based on these core capabilities, transformative strategic intentions will never crystallize and get translated into new practices and results.
Randy Kirchain
ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR, MIT Department of Materials Science and Engineering


Climate Interactive

Climate Interactive developed the C-ROADS simulation to be used with international climate negotiations. The United States Department of State has used the C-ROADS simulator to understand the climate impacts of various country-level proposals and to share that understanding with other parties to the UNFCCC (for example, Deputy Special Envoy Jonathan Pershing presented C-ROADS analysis at the April '09 UNFCCC meeting in Bonn). Participants in this sessions will be split into groups to simulate an actual international climate negotiation. The session will span two breakout time slots and will be run by Professor John Sterman, a developer of the C-ROADS simulation and the author of the book Business Dynamics: Systems Thinking and Modeling for a Complex World.
John Sterman
JAY W. FORRESTER PROFESSOR OF MANAGEMENT, MIT Sloan School of Management; Director, MIT's System Dynamics Group


Role Simulation

Oftentimes when working with other parties disputes arise. These can result from different goals, interests or even styles of dealing with other parties. In this session attendees will negotiate with one another on economic and environmental issues to understand their own dispute resolution styles, how to develop creative solutions, and how to think about tradeoffs. The session will be led by Professor Larry Susskind, a thought leader in the field of negotiation and mediation.
Larry Susskind
FORD PROFESSOR OF URBAN & ENVIRONMENTAL PLANNING, MIT Department of Urban Studies and Planning; Director of the Public Disputes Program & Visiting Professor, Harvard Law School


Systems Thinking 101

System dynamics is a methodology for studying and managing complex feedback systems, such as one finds in business and other social systems. In fact it has been used to address practically every sort of feedback system. While the word system has been applied to all sorts of situations, feedback is the differentiating descriptor here. Feedback refers to the situation of X affecting Y and Y in turn affecting X perhaps through a chain of causes and effects. One cannot study the link between X and Y and, independently, the link between Y and X and predict how the system will behave. Only the study of the whole system as a feedback system will lead to correct results. (Source: System Dynamics Society) In this session we will give you an overview of systems dynamics, the methodology to use it and discuss some key examples of how system dynamics can improve decision-making around environmental and social issues.
John Lyneis
JOHN LYNEIS, PhD candidate in System Dynamics Group, MIT Sloan School of Management


Afternoon Keynote

Gary Hirshberg
CE-YO, Stonyfield Farm
Much of the 20th century's social and economic development was built on mythological foundations—for instance:
- The idea that the earth is a subsidiary of our economies–there for the taking and dumping
- The idea that the earth is infinitely resilient to withstand humans' abuses
Even the very fundamental allowance in our economic theories for "externalities" means that often no one is held accountable for the direct consequences of economic activities that do not appear on income statements or balance sheets.

Another myth is that food can be cheap. The problem with this idea is that in fact we now know there are significant nutritional, environmental and social costs incurred in the production of so-called cheap food–we just don't pay them at the supermarket check-out. The net result of businesses and an overall economic system that are founded on myths is that economic success for one party or constituency is always at the expense of another. Someone or something always pays when one party wins.This presentation will examine one company's 28-year effort to address these myths head-on; to seek solutions that internalize externalities to the greatest extent possible and that create Win-Win-Win-Win formulae in which the conditions for all stakeholders—shareholders, employees, farmers, consumers, even livestock—can be enhanced. This is not only about how we can and must THINK differently, but also about proven ACTIONS and RESULTS that can encourage us all to embrace sustainability goals in all that we do.
Karin Ireton
DIRECTOR OF SUSTAINABILITY MANAGEMENT, Standard Bank
Karin leads the sustainability programme for the Standard Bank, Africa’s largest financial services group, where she guides the incorporation of sustainability principles and thinking into the way the Group conducts business. Focus areas include responsible financing, climate change and energy, environmental and social risk and the communication of sustainability performance and issues to key stakeholders.<br><br>Prior to joining Standard Bank Karin held a similar role at mining giant, Anglo American. She has also previously served as a sustainable energy advisor at Eskom and Manager of the then Industrial Environmental Forum. Karin is active on numerous sustainability advisory boards and chairs the international Stakeholder Council for the Global Reporting Initiative and the IoD’s Sustainable Development Forum. Finally, she is a Trustee of the Endangered Wildlife Trust. Karin holds an MA in International Political Economy from the University of Leeds.
Kook-Hyun Moon
PRESIDENT, New Paradigm Institute
Kook-Hyun Moon is currently the President of New Paradigm Institute.  He was formerly the President and CEO of Yuhan-Kimberly. Yuhan-Kimberly was established as a joint venture between Kimberly-Clark and the Yuhan Corporation in 1970, and is today one of Kimberly-Clark’s largest and most successful subsidiary companies. Mr. Moon earned an MBA from Seoul National University and a BA in English and Business Administration from Hanguk Univ. of Foreign Studies.


Closed Loop 101

As more people learn about resource use and waste streams from media like "The Story of Stuff" and Cradle-to-Cradle, they will demand more environmentally friendly goods that use recycled materials and can be broken down to create new inputs for new goods. How does this happen on the ground? What level of coordination among different entities is required to make this happen? In this session we will begin to explore these questions with top-notch firms who are right in the middle of answering these questions.
Scott Chase
REGIONAL & MAJOR ACCOUNT RESOURCE MANAGER, Casella
Jim Hanna
DIRECTOR OF ENVIRONMENTAL AFFAIRS, Starbucks
John Lively
DIRECTOR OF ENVIRONMENT AND MATERIAL SCIENCE, Preserve
Randi Mail
RECYCLING DIRECTOR, City of Cambridge


Making Globalization Work For All

This session will focus on how to improve working conditions and labor standards in global supply chains. Based upon Richard Locke’s research on the supply chains of Nike, HP, Coca Cola and other global corporations, this session will explore how best one can combine corporate profitability and just labor standards. The connection between different aspects of sustainability (labor justice, environmental stewardship, waste reduction, etc.) will also be discussed.
Richard Locke
DEPUTY DEAN AND ALVIN J. SITEMAN PROFESSOR OF ENTREPRENEURSHIP, MIT Sloan School of Management


Sustainability in the Built Environment

How are we developing green and sustainable buildings today? What are the financing and design challenges and how can we integrate them into successful developments? Hear from developers, lenders, and leaders on the public and private side about how development is moving forward while meeting the current challenges of incorporating sustainability in a financially strained world. Ask questions about the future of sustainability in the built environment, and hear where new opportunities may be arising in this field.
James Boyle
PRESIDENT AND CEO, Sustainability Roundtable, Inc.
Brian (Tony) Ciochetti
CHAIRMAN AND DIRECTOR, MIT Center for Real Estate
John E. Fernández
PROFESSOR, MIT Department of Architecture
John E. Fernandez is a Professor and member of the Building Technology Program in the Department of Architecture. He has been a member of the faculty since 1999 teaching in the design studio and numerous technology courses including Integrated Building Systems, all department structures courses, construction and materials and various workshops.

His research has been focused on the materials and physical elements and components of the assemblies and systems of buildings. A culminating publication of his research of the past several years is the newly published book, "Material Architecture: emergent materials for innovative buildings and ecological construction." (2005. Architectural Press: Oxford).

Currently, Professor Fernandez is engaged in the articulation of concepts of the ecology of contemporary construction. This effort involves identifying the distinct consumption profile and resource requirement attributes of our existing anthropogenic stock of buildings while formulating design strategies that contribute to reuse and recycling of building materials and components. Accepting the essential tenets of the field of industrial ecology, Fernandez is involved in two primary initiatives intended to bring forth real change in the ways in which material and energy networks are configured toward the making of contemporary buildings.
Scot Horst
SENIOR VICE PRESIDENT FOR LEED, U.S. Green Building Council
As Senior Executive of the U.S. Green Building Council's LEED Program, Scot Horst significantly influences the global course of sustainable design and building performance. Scot brings genuine expertise to helping the built environment intersect with natural systems. His professional experience includes the private and nonprofit sectors as president of both 7group, a leading green building consultancy, and Athena Institute International, a nonprofit dedicated to the life cycle assessment of buildings. Before joining USGBC he chaired the LEED Steering Committee and championed the development of LEED v.3. He was awarded the USGBC Leadership Award for LEED in 2008. Scot sits on the board of the Sustainable Building Alliance in Paris, the Advisory Board of Cradle to Cradle, and the Buildings Retrofit and Finance Steering Committee of the World Economic Forum.
Jim Hunt
CHIEF OF ENVIRONMENTAL AND ENERGY SERVICES, City of Boston
Jim Hunt serves on Mayor Thomas Menino’s Cabinet as Chief for Environmental and Energy Services for the City of Boston. In this capacity, Jim Hunt is the Mayor’s lead advisor on environmental and energy policy and oversees several City agencies including the Inspectional Services Department, the Environment Department, Parks Planning, and Boston’s Recycling Program. Jim also serves as a Mayoral Appointee to the Board of Directors of the Massachusetts Water Resources Authority (MWRA) and as a Trustee on the Boston Groundwater Trust. Prior to joining the City, Jim Hunt served as Assistant Secretary for the Commonwealth’s Executive Office of Environmental Affairs (EOEA) and was responsible for administering the Massachusetts Environmental Policy Act (MEPA). Jim Hunt was recently appointed to the Commonwealth’s Climate Protection and Green Economy Advisory Committee, which will advise the Executive Office of Energy and Environment on statewide measures to reduce greenhouse gas emissions.
Jacob Knowles
DIRECTOR OF SUSTAINABLE DESIGN, Bard, Rao & Athanas Consulting Engineers LLC
Jacob Knowles is the Director of Sustainable Design at BR+A Consulting Engineers. Here, he manages the sustainability and energy-efficiency agenda for BR+A’s major projects, including healthcare, research and large institutional work. His team of energy analysts and sustainability consultants engage the owner, architect, and in-house engineering team-members in an innovative process to maximize building performance. His work has supported achievement of LEED Gold and Platinum Certification, as well as the MA DOER High Performance Buildings Grant. Jacob has also presented at numerous engagements, including Build Boston, NESEA, and Labs21.
Deborah Morse
DIRECTOR OF REAL ESTATE DEVELOPMENT, Boston Housing Authority
Scott Wisdom
ASSOCIATE RELATIONSHIP MANAGER, U.S. Bank's Commercial Real Estate Group


A Reform Movement at a Crossroads

The Fair Trade foods and beverage category is now fairly well-established and represents over $1 billion in retail sales in the U.S. and is growing at about 20% annually. It has been embraced by small, mission-driven firms, iconic Fortune 500 brands, activists, faith-based groups, and every variety of retailer. It is unusual in the sustainability/CSR movement because its main tool is a certification and labeling system that is focused on the social welfare of the most vulnerable participants in a supply chain.
Rodney North
, Equal Exchange


Green Marketing

Many companies are embarking on internal sustainability initiatives ranging from operational improvements such as energy efficiency and waste reduction to changes in product design such as environmentally-friendly packaging and use of recyclable and non-toxic materials. Some companies have woven their sustainability initiatives into their customer-facing message. When does it make sense to market sustainability efforts beyond internal stakeholders such as investors and employees? When does it make sense to hold back that information? How do you ensure that customers do not perceive your marketing messaging as greenwashing? How can customers differentiate between greenwashing and green marketing? This session will focus on what marketers need to know about disclosing sustainability efforts to the general public.
Jim Black
VICE CHAIRMAN, Greenguard Environment Institute (GEI)
Michael Hopkins
EDITOR-IN-CHIEF, MIT Sloan Management Review
Mike Sullivan
BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT, IBM Big Green Innovations
David Wilcox
FOUNDER, ReachScale


Ideavation

Sustainability may seem like a straightforward concept, but the concept of a sustainable world within the context of our current reality is hard to wrap our minds around. At times the problem is not how to overcome obstacles that prevent a more sustainable way of living, but imagining what a sustainable world will look like in the first place. We will need truly innovative solutions to shift our habitual dependence on old ways of Industrial Age life.

One approach to breakthrough innovations is open source systems. For example, free software distributed and continuously developed by online communities, information and data organized by a collective group, or competitions in which ideas and solutions are crowdsourced from the public. How can open source systems be used to solve the hard yet unavoidable problems we face in preserving our planet? More importantly, how can the open source approach lead to innovative solutions in sustainability and new ways of 21st Century life?
Eric von Hippel
PROFESSOR OF TECHNOLOGICAL INNOVATION, MIT Sloan School of Management
Robert Laubacher
RESEARCH ASSOCIATE, MIT Sloan School of Management


Individual Action

Leveraging individual behavior to address sustainability concerns is potentially the fastest and cheapest way to create lasting societal change. Case studies, particularly in the energy sector, have shown that by complementing technological, political and economic action with behavioral theory, organizations can create in deeper systemic transformations. To achieve this change, harnessing the power of individual action is crucial, but developing and distributing effective messaging to motivate action can be a daunting challenge. The interactions between individuals, messages, and media are many, complex, and in high competition for everyone's attention. Therefore, the drivers and motivators of any audience provides the fundamental building blocks of successful behavior change strategy.

This workshop will introduce participants to some of the primary drivers and motivators behind people's actions. Through a combination of small-group activities and larger discussions, the following questions will be addressed.
- How can behavior change strategy improve sustainability communications?
- What tools exist to understand and influence behavior change?
- How does behavior change fit into the larger picture of sustainable development?
Rebecca Dahl
GRADUATE STUDENT IN STRATEGIC LEADERSHIP TOWARDS SUSTAINABILITY, Blekinge Institute of Technology
Steve Marshall
GRADUATE STUDENT IN STRATEGIC LEADERSHIP TOWARDS SUSTAINABILITY, Blekinge Institute of Technology
Adam Siegel
SUSTAINABILITY CONSULTANT, Cause Consulting


Local Economy

Some say local is the new green. From a pure supply chain perspective, that may be true. However, local means much more, from community development and civic engagement to job creation and environmental stewardship. This panel consists of Cambridge/Somerville community stakeholders including a local business owner, a local politician, a local community organizer, and a local media representative. This discussion will address what it means to be local, why we should be local, and how local communities can promote sustainability.
David Day
ARTS AND ENTERTAINMENT EDITOR, Boston's Weekly Dig
Rebekah Gewirtz
WARD 6 ALDERMAN, City of Somerville
Joe Grafton
EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR, Somerville Local First
Christina Ingersoll
MBA CANDIDATE, MIT Sloan School of Management
Michael Kanter
CO-OWNER AND CHIEF VISIONARY OFFICER, Cambridge Naturals


ESG Investing

Many investors today are demanding much more from their investments than just financial return. Investors have become increasingly interested in maximizing social good without sacrificing portfolio diversification or financial performance. Investment strategies range from screening out companies that engage in questionable practices to proactively investing in companies that consistently promote environmental stewardship, social justice, and good corporate governance. According to Ceres, a national network of investors and environmental groups, long-term investors see sustainability performance as an indicator of strong management and long-term strategy for future growth. In other words, many investors are starting to see social investments as good business opportunities.

How do players in the social investment space effectively engage with key stakeholders such as sustainable companies, investors, competitors, social and environmental groups, local communities, and others benefiting from the investments? How do you increase transparency to ensure that the social investments are truly making a difference for all key stakeholders? In this session, we will explore these questions and have a discussion on how we, as a society, might prioritize our investments to maximize both positive social impact and financial return.
Karin Chamberlain
INDEX MANAGER, FTSE KLD Indexes (division of RiskMetrics Group)
Miguel Granier
FOUNDER/DIRECTOR, Invested Development
Kirk Hourdajian
PROJECT MANAGER OF CORPORATE PARTNERSHIPS, Environmental Defense Fund
Alla Jezmir
PRINCIPAL, Green Portfolio, Calvert Foundation


Evening Keynote

Mindy Lubber
PRESIDENT, Ceres
Mindy S. Lubber is President of Ceres, the leading coalition of investors, environmental organizations and other public interest groups working with companies and investors to build sustainability into the capital markets and address sustainability challenges such as global climate change. She also directs the Investor Network on Climate Risk (INCR), a network of more than 80 institutional investors representing over $8 trillion in assets that coordinates U.S. investor responses to the financial risks and opportunities posed by climate change.