Program

Friday 22 April 2011
08:45
Registration
09:30
Welcome Address
09:45
Morning Keynote
10:30
Break
10:45
Bending the Water Cost Curve: Innovations to Avert Water Crisis
Inspired by the famous "water cost curves" in the 2030 Water Resources Group's "Charting Our Water Future" report, this panel will highlight businesses that are capitalizing on opportunities to mitigate future water supply-demand imbalances. Panelists will discuss the solutions their firms have developed to reduce agricultural, industrial or municipal water demand and/or increasing water supply.
Marc Bracken
VP and General Manager, Echologics
With more than 18 years of experience in acoustical and vibration engineering, Marc Bracken is vice president and general manager of Toronto-based Echologics, a leader in the development of acoustic technologies that can detect underground leaks and assess the condition of water pipes without breaking ground. Since starting Echologics, Marc has led the company in taking new technologies to the market, overseeing the Research and Development that has advanced signal processing, sensor and hardware design of leak detection systems. Of particular focus, has been the development of a new acoustical correlation technology for leak detection in large diameter trunk mains, and advancement of a new pipe wall thickness assessment technology. Marc has presented numerous technical papers on leak detection and water pipe condition assessment. Marc received Bachelor and Master degrees in mechanical engineering from the University of Toronto.
John Briscoe
Gordon McKay Prof. of the Practice of Environmental Engineering, SEAS, Harvard University
John Briscoe is a Professor of the Practice of Environmental Engineering and Health at Harvard University. John's career has focused on the issues of water and economic development. He has worked: as an engineer in the water agencies of South Africa and Mozambique; as an epidemiologist at the Cholera Research Center in Bangladesh; as a professor of water resources at the University of North Carolina; and, for the past 20 years in a variety of policy and operational positions in the World Bank. Most recently he has served as the Bank’s Senior Water Advisor and the Country Director for Brazil. He received his Ph.D. in Environmental Engineering at Harvard University and his B.Sc. in Civil Engineering at the University of Cape Town, South Africa. In addition to the United States, Briscoe has lived in his native South Africa, Bangladesh, Mozambique, India and Brazil. He speaks English, Afrikaans, Bengali, Portuguese, and Spanish.
Jeff Fulgham
CSO, GE Water
Jeffrey J. Fulgham is the Chief Sustainability Officer and ecomagination Leader for GE Power & Water. In this role Jeff applies his 30 years of experience in the water industry to creating sustainable water solutions across GE’s global facilities and employees, driving sustainable water solutions to GE Water’s 50,000 global customers, and working through NGOs, partners and universities globally to create more sustainable communities.
Rob McGinnis
Co-Founder and CTO, Oasys Water
Dr. Rob McGinnis, is Co-Founder and Chief Technical Officer of Oasys. He is the inventor of the Oasys EOTM Desalination and Water Purification processes and co-inventor of the Oasys Osmotic Heat Engine and Osmotic Grid Storage systems, and is the primary author of more than a dozen patents in desalination, water purification, chemical separations, heat exchange, and membrane and module design. Dr. McGinnis’ work on osmotically driven membrane separation and power systems has been supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Naval Research, NAVSEA, Army TARDEC, Bureau of Reclamation, NASA, WaterCAMPWS, and the National Science Foundation. He earned his B.A. and his PhD in Environmental Engineering at Yale University.
Emilio Tenuta
Director of Corporate Responsibility and Branding, Nalco
Emilio Tenuta is currently Director of Corporate Sustainability and Branding for Nalco Company and has been with the company for 27 years. He is responsible for linking Nalco’s brand strategy with the sustainable solutions offered to more than 50,000 Nalco customers in over 130 countries. In the last two years he has forged strong partnerships with a number of NGO’s around managing water and energy risks in the industrial sector. Those organizations include World Wildlife Fund (WWF), Alliance for Water Stewardship (AWS) and World Economic Forum (WEF). He has more than 25 years of technical sales and marketing experience in various industries including Food and Beverage, Pharmaceutical, Primary Metals and Automotive. He holds a bachelor’s of science degree in chemistry from University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire and a master’s of business degree from Northwestern’s Kellogg School of Management.
10:45
Reviving New England's Fishing Economy
While fishing has played a critical role in New England's economy for centuries, overfishing has been depleting stocks of many important and tasty species of fish like cod and flounder, damaging coastal economies and marine ecosystems. Recently, sustainable fishing pioneers have improved the way fisheries are managed to allow fish stocks to rebuild and create a sustainable fishing economy for generations to come. Join representatives from both the fishing and environmental communities to discuss the problems of overfishing, why they are difficult to overcome, and how innovative solutions to fishery management are making a difference.
Jud Crawford
Science and Policy Manager, Northeast Fisheries Program, Pew Environmental Group
John D. Crawford, PhD. John is a biologist with the Pew Environment Group (PEG) where he manages science and policy matters for the group's Northeast fisheries campaigns. John came to the PEG in 2008 from his position as senior scientist for Conservation Law Foundation. He directed the Initiative on Marine Ecosystem Conservation for six years, managing an international collaboration with WWF-Canada and mapping marine areas of high value for protection of marine biodiversity in the Gulf of Maine region. John entered the environmental arena as a tenured professor at the University of Pennsylvania. His research focused on the behavior and physiology of fishes. He has published numerous peer reviewed papers and taught biology in several academic programs. He maintains his ties to academic science through an active affiliation with the Boston University Marine Program. John holds degrees from Duke University (BS), University of Pennsylvania (MS) and Cornell University (PhD). He is a native of New England where his first hand observation of ecological changes have fueled his passionate interest in marine conservation and the region's heritage.
Eric Hesse
Chairman, Cape Cod Commercial Hook Fishermen's Association
Glen Libby the chairman of the Midcoast Fisherman's Association, a non-profit group seeking to improve the lives of local fishermen. Currently a shrimp fisherman, Glen is part of a family of fishermen and was formerly a groundfisherman. Glen recently helped to organize the Port Clyde fishing cooperative, which allows fishermen to sell their catch directly to customers via a delivery subscription service and online sales. The fishermen use environmentally-friendly fishing gear and support sustainable fishing methods.
Glen Libby
Chairman, Midcoast Fishermen's Association
Glen Libby the chairman of the Midcoast Fisherman's Association, a non-profit group seeking to improve the lives of local fishermen. Currently a shrimp fisherman, Glen is part of a family of fishermen and was formerly a groundfisherman. Glen recently helped to organize the Port Clyde fishing cooperative, which allows fishermen to sell their catch directly to customers via a delivery subscription service and online sales. The fishermen use environmentally-friendly fishing gear and support sustainable fishing methods.
John Sterman
Director, MIT System Dynamics Group
John D. Sterman is the Jay W. Forrester Professor of Management at the MIT Sloan School of Management and Director of MIT's System Dynamics Group. His research includes systems thinking and organizational learning, computer simulation of corporate strategy and public policy issues, and environmental sustainability. He is the author of many scholarly and popular articles on the challenges and opportunities facing organizations today, including the book Modeling for Organizational Learning, and the award-winning textbook Business Dynamics. Prof. Sterman's research centers on improving decision making in complex systems, including corporate strategy and operations, energy policy, public health, environmental sustainability, and climate change. He has pioneered the development of "management flight simulators" of corporate and economic systems. These flight simulators are now used by corporations, universities and governments around the world. His research ranges from the dynamics of organizational change and the implementation of sustainable improvement programs to climate change and the implementation of policies to promote a sustainable world. Prof. Sterman has twice been awarded the Jay W. Forrester Prize for the best published work in system dynamics, won an IBM Faculty Award, won the Accenture Award for the best paper of the year published in the California Management Review, has seven times won awards for teaching excellence, and was named one of the MIT Sloan School's "Outstanding Faculty" by the Business Week Guide to the Best Business Schools. He has been featured on public television's News Hour, National Public Radio's Marketplace, CBC television, Fortune, the Financial Times, Business Week, and other media for his research and innovative use of interactive simulations in management education and policymaking.
10:45
Sustainability in the Built Environment: Integrating Transport Planning with Land Use and Building Design
For much of the post-World War II era, transport policy focused on 'the concrete commons' has resulted in land use patterns that are not only energy and space intensive, but also dependent on continued economic growth for their viability. Recently however, the convergence of the lingering impacts of recession, demographic shift, and increasing environmental awareness has provided an opportunity to develop new paradigms and strategies for urban development and land use planning that are economically resilient, environmentally sustainable, and socially equitable. How can and should transport policy be leveraged to promote such development patterns, given its inseparability from land use policy as demonstrated throughout the history of cities and regions in the United States and abroad?
Joe Coughlin
Director, MIT AgeLab; lecturer, Engineering Systems Division & Dept. of Urban studies and planning
Joseph F. Coughlin, founder and Director of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology AgeLab, teaches strategic management, planning and public policy in the Engineering Systems Division and the Department of Urban Studies & Planning at MIT. His research, which he features on his blog Disruptive Demographics, focuses on how the convergence of baby boomer expectations and technology will shape the future of public policy and drive innovation across global industries including the financial services, insurance, health, IT, telecommunications, automobile and retail sectors.
Yonah Freemark
Graduate Student, MIT Dept. of urban studies and planning and Editor, The Transport Politic
Yonah Freemark is currently a graduate student at the Department of Urban Studies and Planning of the MIT School of Architecture and Planning. An Urban Leaders Fellow sponsored by the Rockefeller Foundation, he writes for The Transport Politic, a blog on current issues in transport policy and planning, and the column Grassroutes for Next American City.
Diana Lind
Editor at Large, Next American City and Founder, New Cities Foundation
Diana Lind is the current editor at large for Next American City, for which she was also editor in chief from 2008 to 2010. During her tenure at Next American City, she started the URBANEXUS monthly event series, the Next American Vanguard fellowship program, the annual Open Cities conference and oversaw a doubling of the magazine's subscribers and ad pages. She remains the host of Metro Matters, a monthly podcast in collaboration with the Brookings Institution. Since receiving her B.A. in English from Cornell University and her M.F.A. in Creative Writing from Columbia University, she has been an instructor or lecturer at numerous universities including Columbia University, Drexel University, Rutgers University-Camden and the University of Windsor, and her work has been profiled in The New York Times, Monocle and PAPER among other publications. She was born in Manhattan in 1981.
Susanne Rasmussen
Director of Environmental and Transportation Planning, City of Cambridge
Susanne Rasmussen is director of the Environmental and Transportation Planning Division in the Cambridge Community Development Department and has more than 20 years of experience in the implementation of environmental policies and programs. She is responsible for the city's efforts to reduce greenhouse gas emissions through the Cities for Climate Protection program and for developing programs to engage residents and business in this effort. She oversees the development of new transportation policies and implementation of a variety of transportation programs and projects such as large multi-modal roadway projects, traffic calming, and transportation demand management. Prior to joining the City of Cambridge Ms. Rasmussen was a senior manager for a non-profit energy service company and a land use planner in a major metropolitan city. Ms. Rasmussen obtained a master's degree in City Planning from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1989 and a master's in Civil Engineering and Planning from the University of Aalborg in Denmark in 1987.
12:05
Lunch and Expo
13:05
Afternoon Keynote
13:50
Break
14:05
Building a Regional Food System
With obesity approaching epidemic status, millions of people living in food deserts with limited access to healthy and affordable food, and farmers struggling to make ends meet, the US food system is broken. This panel explores how shifting to a regional food system may be able to address some of the key problems with our current food system and ultimately improve public health. Participants will think critically about the challenges to implementing a regional food system and highlight a few innovative companies that are making great strides in regional sourcing, like Bon Appetit Management Compay and Chipotle.
Maisie Greenawalt
VP of Sustainability, Bon Appetit Management Company
Maisie Greenawalt oversees Bon Appétit Management Company’s culinary development and purchasing policy initiatives, and leads Bon Appétit’s marketing and communications efforts. Maisie has helped conceptualize and develop the Farm to Fork program, the Eat Local Challenge, and Low Carbon Diet Day. She has taken a leadership role in setting food procurement policies for Bon Appetit, driving policy to only purchase poultry raised without non-therapeutic antibiotics and Certified Humane and cage-free shell eggs. Maisie has recently been navigating the issue of farm worker rights and collaborated with CEO Fedele Bauccio to usher in a sweeping code of conduct for the company’s tomato suppliers as it relates to farm worker rights. Additionally, Maisie is president of the Bon Appétit Management Company Foundation, whose mission is to educate people about how their food choices affect the global environment and local economies.
Ken Kaplan
Associate Director and Co-Founder, MIT Collaborative Initiatives
Ken Kaplan serves as Associate Director of MIT Collaborative Initiatives. Earlier at MIT, Kaplan was a Principal Research Scientist in the Department of Architecture and Planning, and a member of the Research Laboratory of Electronics. There he led several design-integration projects, including the Surgical Room of the Future Project and an investigation of technology transfer from DOD to civilian healthcare applications.

Kaplan became an architect after an earlier career as a psychiatric social worker. These two professions give him a unique perspective on how systems and people work and interact. His experience includes architectural design, teaching, writing, and research; social work; and healthcare system design. Kaplan received his Masters in Psychiatric Social Work from New York University. After several years of social work research and practice, he earned a Masters in Architecture and a Masters in Historic Preservation from Columbia University, where he was awarded the Alpha Rho Chi medal for leadership. He has held professorships at the Graduate School of Architecture, Planning and Preservation at Columbia University, as well as the Graduate School of Design at Harvard University.
Fred Kirschenmann
President, Stone Barns Center for Food and Agriculture
Fred is the Distinguished Fellow at the Leopold Center for Sustainable Agriculture and the President of Stone Barn Center for Food and Agriculture. He also manages his family's 2,600-acre certified organic farm in south central North Dakota and helped found Farm Verified Organic, Inc., a private certification agency, and the Northern Plains Sustainable Agriculture Society. Fred is convening chair of a multi-state task force, Agriculture of the Middle, that focuses on research and markets for midsize American farms. The group also has established the Association of Family Farms to create standards and markets for these types of food. Fred has been appointed to several boards, including USDA's National Organic Standards Board, the North Central Region's Sustainable Agriculture Research and Education (SARE) administrative council, Henry A. Wallace Institute for Alternative Agriculture board of directors. He also served a three-year appointment on the National Commission on Industrial Farm Animal Production operated by the Johns Hopkins School of Public Health and funded by Pew Charitable Trusts. Fred has authored numerous articles and book chapters dealing with ethics and agriculture and holds degrees from Yankton College in South Dakota, Hartford Theological Seminary in Connecticut, and a Ph.D. in philosophy from the University of Chicago.
Bob Martin
Senior Officer, Pew Environmental Group
Bob Martin is a senior officer at the Pew Environment Group and previously was the Executive Director of the Pew Commission on Industrial Farm Animal Production, a two year study funded by The Pew Charitable Trusts by a grant to Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public. The charge to the Commission was to recommend solutions to the problems caused by concentrated animal feeding operations in the areas of public health, the environment, rural communities, and animal welfare. The Commission’s final report, Putting Meat on the Table: Industrial Farm Animal Production in America, was release on April 28, 2008.

Martin, a native of Kansas, grew up in South Dakota and is a Phi Beta Kappa graduate of the University of South Dakota. After graduation, he worked as a general assignment newspaper report in Pennsylvania and then for the Kansas Farmers Union. He has more than 30 years experience in public policy and politics at both the federal and state levels. Previously, he worked for former South Dakota Senators George McGovern, Jim Abourezk, Tom Daschle, and current Senator Tim Johnson. In addition, he worked for then Kansas Congressman Dan Glickman, as well as for members of the Kansas Senate Democratic Caucus.

Martin is married and he and his wife have a college age daughter.
14:05
All Linked Together: Sustainable Supply Chains
What do agriculture, biotechnology, and retail have in common? They all draw on natural resources to produce products, and they all dispose of waste on the same finite planet. What else? What crossover is there between disparate industries and what can they learn from each other? How do their definitions of sustainability lead them to implement sustainability initiatives in different ways? Companies in the same or similar sectors usually look to each other to learn about best practices. The purpose of the session is to showcase innovative organizations in varied sectors that support sustainable supply chains and to cross-pollinate best practices. The panel aims to challenge the participants to consider how it is that an industry's definition of sustainability drives its actions.
Barbra Batshalom
Founder and CEO, The Green Roundtable, Inc.
Barbra Batshalom is a serial social entrepreneur and a leader in the green building industry. With 20 years of experience in architecture, policy, consulting, strategy and business development, Barbra has consistently identified challenges and formulated business solutions that transform the market; doing well by doing good. In 1998 Barbra was the founder of The Green Roundtable, a not-just-for-profit company consulting to government, institutional and private clients in real estate. She created the NEXUS Green Building Resource Center, which became a model for franchise and the SPI Green Firm certification, evaluating the capabilities of private sector design and construction companies to deliver consistent, high quality sustainability services. Barbra is a compulsive systems-thinker with a unique talent to solve critical problems facing our world by integrating social, economic and environmental solutions.
Edgar Blanco
Research Director, MIT Center for Transportation & Logistics; Exec. Director, MIT SCALE Latin America
Dr. Edgar Blanco is a Research Director at the MIT Center for Transportation & Logistics and is the Executive Director of the MIT SCALE Network in Latin America. His current research focus is the design of environmentally efficient supply chains. He also leads research initiatives on supply chain innovations in emerging markets, disruptive mobile technologies in value chains and optimization of humanitarian operations. Dr. Blanco has over thirteen years of experience in designing and improving logistics and supply chain systems, including the application of operations research techniques, statistical methods, GIS technologies and software solutions to deliver significant savings in business operations. Prior to joining MIT, he was leading the Inventory Optimization practice at Retek (now Oracle Retail). He received his Ph.D. from the School of Industrial and Systems Engineering at the Georgia Institute of Technology. His educational background includes a B.S. and M.S. in Industrial Engineering from Universidad de los Andes (Bogotá, Colombia) and a M.S. in Operations Research from the Georgia Institute of Technology.
Deverl Maserang
Vice President, NA Product Supply & Logistics, Chiquita Brands International
Mr. Deverl Maserang is currently Vice President, NA Product Supply & Logistics for Chiquita Brands International, headquartered in Cincinnati, Ohio. Mr. Maserang is responsible for operations at all Chiquita U.S. Ports and Warehousing Distribution Centers, as well as Logistics Planning and the North America banana and salad Transportation Network. He recently assumed responsibility for all global supply chain operations for the Chiquita Fruit Ingredients Division in Central and South America. Prior to joining Chiquita, Mr. Maserang held a number of increasingly responsible positions at United Parcel Service, Pepsi Bottling Group, and various start-ups in the area of Industrial Engineering, Operations, and Supply Chain Management. A native of Texas, he joined Chiquita in 2003 post restructuring to assist in the transformation of the business. Mr. Maserang holds a degree from Texas Tech University, Lubbock, in Industrial Engineering.
James Salo
Senior Vice President, Strategy and Research, Trucost
James (Jamie) Salo is the Vice President, Strategy and Research of the environmental data firm Trucost. Trucost provides data and analysis on company emissions and natural resource usage and presents these in financial as well as quantity terms, providing the basis for an improved dialogue between companies, investors and other stakeholders. At Trucost, James has been the research lead in a number of large client and public environmental research projects for Trucost including the Carbon Counts Asia 2007 report released at Bali, produced for the International Finance Corporation (IFC) which examined the carbon footprints of over 90 mutual funds and the MSCI Asia ex-Japan index. James earned DPhil from Oxford University from the Oxford University Centre of the Environment (OUCE).
14:05
Closed Loop 102: Adopting a Zero-Waste Approach
Positive waste reduction efforts such as improved recycling programs and renewable material innovations indicate that trash is receiving greater widespread attention, but there is still much work to be done. Waste streams and material life cycles are a mystery to most, making the "out of sight, out of mind" mentality the common mode of thinking about trash. This highlights the need to explicate the complex cycles related to the effects of consumption, meaning where products come from and where they end up. Building on last year's "Closed Loop 101" discussion that questioned the feasibility of reaching zero waste, this year's panel will focus on turning the idea into practice. Distinguished professionals across disciplines ranging from media to the public sector will share key strategies, personal accounts, pivotal moments, and lessons learned on their path to adopting zero-waste approaches.
John Fischer
Branch Chief, Waste Planning and Commercial Waste Reduction (MassDEP)
John Fischer is Branch Chief for Commercial Waste Reduction and Waste Planning at the Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection (MassDEP). In this position, he oversees development and implementation of Massachusetts’ Solid Waste Master Plan, solid waste and recycling data, the Solid Waste Advisory Committee, and disaster debris planning. John also coordinates MassDEP’s programs to advance waste reduction, recycling, and composting by businesses and institutions in Massachusetts. John has worked at MassDEP since 1998, including several years managing MassDEP’s implementation of the Toxics Use Reduction Act. Prior to joining MassDEP, John worked on solid waste and recycling policy issues as Assistant Director of Waste Policy at the Massachusetts Executive Office of Environmental Affairs. John holds a Bachelor’s degree in Human Ecology from Connecticut College and a Master’s in City Planning, focusing on Environmental Policy and Planning, from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.
Randi Mail
Director of Recycling, Cambridge Dept. of Public Works
Since 2002, Randi Mail has been the Recycling Director for the City of Cambridge. Before working for Cambridge she worked for Green Gold, an economic development corporation based Buffalo which worked to establish the Western New York region as an hub for green commerce. Her passion for environmental solutions continues to inspire others to adopt sustainable behaviors and work together on larger projects.
Pablo Rey Mazón
Founder, Basurama
Pablo Rey Mazón has worked with Basurama (Trash-o-rama) since its foundation in 2001. Basurama is an association for the discussion, research and production on waste and reuse in every all formats and possible meanings. Basurama's activities range from workshops and multimedia production to interventions in public space and curatorial projects, always having trash as the common factor. Basurama has just finished Urban Solid Waste, a series of public art projects in Latin America in collaboration with AECID (Spanish Agency for International Development Cooperation) focused on waste, local agents and public space. Pablo's work in Basurama is mainly centered in processes associated with the metabolism of the cities in a territorial scale; the role of the informal sector in waste management systems; and the projects for the geolocation of waste as a resource. As a photographer he is now developing 6000km.org, a project that, through geotagged panorama photos, researches about the landscapes that the Spanish real estate crisis has left behind. In Basurama he has also developed spermola.org, a web for the free exchange of objects, as well as the project for the geolocation of waste material in the Ruhr Gebiet in Germany. He takes part in several independent research groups such as: Meipi, which develops the open source software meipi.org for participatory geo-blogging; Kulturometer.org, that researches cultural expenses in Madrid Region for the development of an analytic web visualization tool; Montera34, a web-design studio that develops organization and visualization tools. He has researched the links between Typography and Architecture and has been teacher of black and white photography.

Pablo Rey Mazón holds a Master in Architecture from the Escuela Técnica Superior de Arquitectura de Madrid and has also studied in the Technische Universität Dresden in Germany. He is now living in Boston and developing projects for Basurama in the US.
Libby McDonald
CoLab MIT, Documentary FilmmakeR AND AUTHOr
As Community Innovator Lab's Green Hub Global Program Associate Libby McDonald works in waste management and recycling in Central and South America. A writer and documentary filmmaker, she most recently published the book The Toxic Sandbox: The Truth About Environmental Toxins and Our Children's Health (Penguin, 2007) and was featured on more than 60 radio shows, talking about how environmental pollutants impact the social, cognitive, and physical development of our children. Libby has written, directed, and produced film and television for two decades. Film and TV credits include New School Order (Sundance Film Festival Official Entry & national PBS broadcast), The Forbidden Land (National PBS Broadcast), and Terror Town (funded by ITVS). An advocate for children, Libby launched and served as director of The Learning Community Charter School, a K-8 public school in Jersey City, New Jersey and Lakeside Preschool, a Waldorf-inspired school in the Adirondack Mountains.
Adam Mitchell
Partner, SaveThatStufF, Inc.
Mr. Mitchell began his recycling career in Boston in 1988. Mr. Mitchell spent the 1990's in New York City first as a consultant with the Sanitation Department, and later becoming a Vice President with Eastern Waste Services (EWS). Mr. Mitchell returned to Boston in 2000 to become a Partner at Save That Stuff, Inc., Mr. Mitchell has diversified the company's business line to include the collection of office paper, organic waste, and co-mingled containers. Mr. Mitchell is recognized regionally as an innovator in setting up sustainable waste recycling collection systems.
14:05
System Dynamics in Sustainability and Its Application to Climate Change Policies
System dynamics is a methodology for studying and managing complex feedback systems, such as one finds in business and other social systems (Source: System Dynamics Society). In this session we will give you an overview of this methodology, its relationship to sustainability issues and its applicability to define climate change policies through the C-ROADS "Common Platform" simulation. The C-ROADS is designed to help climate analysts improve their understanding of how various proposals to the UNFCCC will impact climate outcomes, is based on the biogeophysical and integrated assessment literature and includes representations of the carbon cycle, other GHGs, radiative forcing, global mean surface temperature, and sea level change.
Travis Franck
Postdoctoral Research Fellow, The Fletcher School/Tufts University
Dr. Travis Franck works at the not-for-profit Climate Interactive, whose mission is to provide a deeper understanding of climate and energy issues to decision-makers through the creation of interactive real-time decision support tools. As a Senior Scientist and Policy Analyst, he works with international stakeholders in the public and private sectors. Previously he has worked at the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) in Paris and has contributed to three UNFCCC COP meetings. An expert modeler and communicator, he has presented in many different forums, including World Bank, UNDP, engineering, and climate conferences. Travis received his PhD in Technology, Management & Policy at MIT, where he researched the impact of tropical storms and sea-level rise on coastal communities.
PJ Lamberson
Senior Lecturer, MIT Sloan School of Management
PJ Lamberson is a Senior Lecturer at the MIT Sloan School of Management and a Visiting Scholar at the Northwestern University Kellogg School of Management and the Northwestern University Institute on Complex Systems (NICO). He received his PhD in mathematics from Columbia University and was a postdoctoral Research Fellow at the Center for the Study of Complex Systems at the University of Michigan. His research examines complex systems in economics, management, political science, ecology, and public health.
15:25
Break
15:40
The Future of Footprinting
In this panel, business leaders will discuss how they are developing and utilizing cutting-edge tools and methodologies to footprint their carbon, water, and materials use throughout the operations chain. Panelists will also be asked to reflect on how footprinting might change in the years ahead: will/should footprinting metrics be standardized and mandated within industries? Should products sold to consumers be required to show their embedded footprint? How can business translate footprinting metrics into effective reductions in environmental impact?
Taha Balafrej
Director of Environment and Sustainability, OCP Group
Holder of a Ph.D. in Mathematics, Taha Balafrej was a professor at the University, before joining the cabinet of the Minister of Environment and urban planning for 3 years. In 2002 he was appointed Director in charge of partnership, communication and cooperation at the Dept. of Environment. In that position, he managed the fund of industrial pollution control and developed the environmental policy in capacity and awareness building. For six years, he has been the focal point of Morocco to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) and negotiated the environmental chapter of the Free-Trade Agreement between Morocco and the USA. He also was member of the Bureau of the UNFCCC for two years and founded the Moroccan Authority for the Clean Development Mechanism. Mr. Balafrej is the author of several articles in the press and made various presentations about Climate, Environment and Sustainable Development issues both at national and international level.
Gina Balunas
Sr. Director for Value Chain Compliance & Environmental Sustainability, Cisco Systems
Gina Balunas is the Senior Director for Value Chain Compliance & Environmental Sustainability at Cisco Systems. In her current role, Gina leads a team that is developing an industry-leading platform to ensure environmental sustainability as a key part of Cisco’s product lifecycle management process. Her team identifies, drives and captures benefits such as reduction and reuse of packaging, optimization of take-back , de-materialization, design for sustainability; and carbon-footprint reduction in the extended supply chain. The team’s objectives are to ensure that all Cisco products can be sourced, manufactured, sold and taken back in a compliant & environmentally responsible manner. Gina has 25 years in the supply chain industry. During her ten years at Cisco, Gina has played a critical role in driving supply chain strategy, sourcing, technology alignment, productivity and quality management. Over the past five years, she has held leadership positions in Global Supply Management . Prior to her career at Cisco, Gina spent five years at Benchmark Electronics, a global EMS company, where she held various executive management positions, including Vice President of Materials Management for the company’s Hudson, New Hampshire operation. While at Benchmark, she worked in the areas of procurement, materials management and operations. Gina has built her career in the Boston area and holds a degree in Economics and Computer Science from Framingham State University. Gina also sits on the MIT-LGO Operating Committee.
Jon Dettling
Director of US Operations, Quantis
Jon Dettling is the US Director for Quantis, an industry-leading consulting firm that specializes in helping companies measure, understand, manage and make known aspects of the environmental sustainability of their products, services and operations. He has a decade’s professional experience in leading applications of life cycle assessment, chemical management and environmental impact assessment. Mr. Dettling has been a member of working groups under the World Resource Institute’s Greenhouse Gas Protocol, of the Sustainability Consortium’s measurement sciences working group, on the Steering Team for the Global CEO Forum’s Project on Packaging, a reviewer for the International Journal of Life Cycle Assessment, and member of the technical committee of the American Center for Life Cycle Assessment. He has worked with a diverse range of leaders in in public and private enterprise, including as such organizations as the World Business Council for Sustainable Development, the Environmental Defense Fund, Pfizer, Steelcase, CalRecycle, Kraft Foods, Intel and many others. Mr. Dettling holds a Master’s degree from the University of Michigan’s School of Public Health in Environmental Health Sciences.
Karen Golmer
Director of Responsible Resource Solutions, Diversey
Karen Golmer is the Director of Responsible Resource Solutions for Diversey, Inc. Diversey is a leading expert in cleaning and sanitation for the food, beverage, commercial, institutional, lodging and laundry industries. Cleaning processes use a great deal of water and Diversey is serious about helping customers become more sustainable. The Responsible Resource Solutions team audits facilities’ to provide full water and energy profiles and recommends best practices to optimize processes, minimize resource use and reduce overall costs. A chemist with an MBA and more than 25 years experience with chemicals and equipment in industrial water and wastewater treatment, Karen has provided technical direction to start-up companies focused on water, including Clean Membranes, a local Boston company that recently received funding. Prior to Diversey, Karen led water treatment programs at various companies including GE Water and Process Technologies, Ecolab and Calgon Corporation, now part of NALCO.
Jeremy Gregory
Research Associate, MIT Materials Science Lab
Jeremy Gregory is a research scientist in the Materials Systems Laboratory and the Engineering Systems Division at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He studies the economic and environmental implications of engineering and system design decisions, particularly in the area of materials production and recovery systems. Research topics include electronics recycling, characterization of sustainable material systems, and product and firm environmental footprinting. He received his PhD and MS from MIT and BS from Montana State University-Bozeman, all in mechanical engineering.
15:40
Economic Case For Sustainability
Corporations are pursuing sustainability for a host of reasons: improving operations, reducing risk, accessing new customers, fulfilling a mission. For some, there is a real or perceived trade-off between sustainability and profitability, while for others, sustainability simply makes good business sense. How do companies make the economic case for sustainability, both internally and externally? To answer the latter, this session will consider the perspective of two influential groups: customers and investors. As these stakeholders are becoming more sophisticated, what proof are they demanding to back up sustainability claims, and how are companies communicating about their values and actions?
Amy Domini
Founder, Domini Social Index and Domini Social Investments
Amy Domini is Founder and CEO of Domini Social Investments. She is widely recognized as the leading voice for socially responsible investing. In 2005, Time magazine named her to the Time 100 list of the world’s most influential people, and in 2009 Time listed her as one of 25 “Responsibility Pioneers” who are changing the world. Also in 2005, President Clinton honored her at the inaugural meeting of the Clinton Global Initiative helping protect children and the environment. In 2006, she was awarded a Doctor of Business Administration, honoris causa degree from Northeastern University College of Law. In 2007, she was awarded a Doctor of Humane Letters, honoris causa by the Berkeley Divinity School at Yale.

Ms. Domini is the author of Socially Responsible Investing: Making a Difference and Making Money (Dearborn Trade, 2001) and The Challenges of Wealth (Dow Jones Irwin, 1988), and a coauthor of Investing for Good (Harper Collins, 1993), The Social Investment Almanac (Henry Holt, 1992), and Ethical Investing (Addison-Wesley, 1984). Ms. Domini holds a B.A. in international and comparative studies from Boston University, and holds the Chartered Financial Analyst designation.
Michael Jacobson
Director, Corporate Responsibility Office, Intel
Michael Jacobson is director of Intel’s Corporate Responsibility Office. In this role, he is responsible for leading Intel’s corporate responsibility strategy with stakeholders across the company. He has an experienced team of experts in corporate social responsibility, strategic alliances, marketing and communications, stakeholder management and reporting who are committed to building upon Intel’s performance as a leading corporate citizen.

Prior to this position Michael managed Intel’s Corporate Affairs team in California and Texas where he was responsible for leading corporate responsibility programs, philanthropic investments and public policy. Prior to Intel he served eight years in Washington DC where he served in senior positions in the executive branch and led economic development for Fort Worth, Texas. He is actively engaged in national and local community based organizations. Jacobson received his bachelor’s degree in Political Science from Baylor University. He resides in Folsom, CA with Kristen, his wife, and Jonathan, their 19 year old son who is attending Arizona State University.
Cary Krosinsky
Senior Vice President, TruCost
Based in the New York office, Cary acts as a senior representative for North America, advising financial and corporate clients. Prior to joining Trucost in June 2008, Cary was a member of CapitalBridge's Operations Committee, providing leadership on data and analytics. Whilst there, he worked in collaboration with Trucost on their award winning 2006 UK Trust Carbon Footprint study and the IFC sponsored Carbon Counts Asia 2007 report, the latter being issued at the December 2007 UN meetings in Bali. Cary is a member of the 70 person Expert Group that created the United Nations Principles for Responsible Investment (PRI), which has been committed to by over US$15 Trillion worth of asset managers and owners. He also co-edited and wrote the book ‘Sustainable Investing: The Art of Long Term Performance' with Nick Robins of HSBC, which features contributions from other leading practitioners.
Chris Park
Lead Principal, Sustainability & Climate Change Practice, Deloitte Consulting
Chris Park is a Principal in Deloitte’s Boston office and co-leads Deloitte’s Enterprise Sustainability practice. Chris joined Deloitte Consulting LLP’s Strategy & Operations practice in 1994. He is a registered architect by training, and in his consulting career, he has served clients in the life sciences, health care provider, manufacturing, higher education, financial services and retail industries. Chris is currently expanding Deloitte’s cross-functional service offerings around sustainability and corporate responsibility through the Enterprise Sustainability Integrated Market Offering (IMO), linking together traditional environmental, social responsibility and sustainability consulting under the umbrella of Deloitte’s FSSs. His primary focus in the sustainability arena is strategy, policy, performance management, operations and implementation planning.

Recognizing the increasing importance of improved social and environmental performance, Chris is defining elements of the “Wholly Sustainable Enterprise”. These services are intended to provide clients a structured approach and framework to drive business case and value initiatives that support sustainability, environmental and CSR activities. Chris has an MBA, MArch and BArch from the University of Michigan.
Jeff Shames
Senior Lecturer in Finance, MIT Sloan
Jeffrey Shames is the retired chairman of MFS Investment Management and the boards of trustees of the MFS Funds. He is Executive in Residence at the MIT Sloan School of Management and serves on the Institute's advisory council for the MIT Leadership Center. Shames joined MFS in 1983 as an industry analyst and was named a portfolio manager in 1985, Chief Equity Officer in 1987, President and a member of the board in 1993, and Chairman and Chief Executive Officer in 1998. In September 2002, he retired as CEO and retained the title of Chairman until his retirement in February 2004. He graduated from Wesleyan University in 1977 and the MIT Sloan School in 1983. In between college and graduate school, he served as a Peace Corps volunteer in Fiji and with the U.S. Department of Agriculture in Washington, D.C. He is a member of the Board of Trustees of the Berklee College of Music, the Board of Trustees of City Year, the Board of Trustees of the X Prize Foundation, and the Board of Directors of Elan PLC.
15:40
Beyond Microfinance
Microfinance has exploded into the public consciousness in recent years. With organizations such as Grameen Bank and Kiva becoming more mainstream, the next question sustainable finance academics and practitioners alike should be asking themselves is: what’s next? The purpose of the panel is to showcase innovative organizations and their business models that support financial sustainability beyond microfinance. The panel aims to challenge participants to think of ways to build on the successes of the microfinance model to bring creative and sustainable financial solutions to some of the world’s most pressing social problems.
Erica Dorn
Manager of Volunteer Partnerships, ACCION USA
Erica is the Manager of Volunteer Partnerships at ACCION. Her work is targeted at building up the capacity and awareness of ACCION by harnessing the capacity and leadership of volunteers and students. Her curiosity has brought her across the globe to master the Spanish language in South America, to study yoga and Buddhism in India, and to teach English to the Chilean Navy, and later to children in South Korea. In 2006, Erica founded a community organization based in Brooklyn that aided redevelopment in New Orleans; it was through this project that she found her passion for localized development initiatives. Following her interest in domestic microfinance she served as Kiva's first U.S. based fellow at ACCION USA in New York City. Erica holds a B.A. in Spanish and International Studies from Colorado State University. Find her on twitter @eldorn.
Kristin Kim
Founder, Sansori
Kristin founded Sansori because our times call for a reimagining of the American ideal – the idea that each person, regardless of one's color, gender, or class, has a gift to share and contribute toward the common good. She envisions a global model of education that lives up to this ideal, embracing all women and men around the world, breaking down barriers and transforming lives. Through Sansori, where students gain tools for financial, organizational, and inner sustainability and launch social enterprises, Kristin hopes to collaborate with others who are transforming the world. At Sansori, Kristin is integrating the best of both private and not-for-profit experiences she's had. She was president of AllLearn, an online educational venture among Oxford, Stanford, and Yale Universities, that served over 11,000 students from over 75 countries. As Director for New Initiatives for Harvard University's Kennedy School of Government, she was instrumental in developing the Women's Leadership Board. She also practiced law at Simpson Thacher & Bartlett's New York and London offices, and specialized in international capital market transactions. Kristin received her J.D. from Harvard Law School and her A.B. from Bryn Mawr College, cum laude, in Chinese Philosophy. She currently serves on the Board of RAIT Investment Trust (NYSE: RAS). She has also served on the Board of Trustees of Bryn Mawr College and many other non-profit boards.
Beth Richardson
Director of GIIRS, B Lab
At B Lab, Beth Richardson is overseeing the launch of GIIRS (the Global Impact Investing Ratings System). GIIRS is a ratings agency that provides companies and funds with social and environmental performance ratings. Beth has worked closely with social entrepreneurs and social enterprise throughout her career. Beth has held roles at Self-Help, a leading community development bank, Ashoka: Innovators for the Public, a non-profit that supports social entrepreneurs in more than 60 countries, and the Amy Biehl Foundation Trust in Cape Town, South Africa. Beth grew up outside of Boston and earned her bachelor's degree from Duke University and her MBA from Kenan-Flagler. Beth now lives in Carrboro, NC with her husband Steven.
Erik Wurster
Carbon Finance Manager, E+Co.
Erik co-founded E+Co's carbon offset program, a wholly-owned subsidiary called E+Carbon, Inc. In addition to overseeing the work of carbon finance staff, Erik develops carbon finance projects. In Mali and Ghana, Erik developed some of the world's first carbon finance projects involving household cook stove technology in accordance with the Gold Standard. In addition, Erik was instrumental in forging E+Co's carbon finance partnership with Goldman Sachs. Prior to joining E+Co, Erik worked as a consultant for the United Nations Development Programme's sustainable energy department and a Norway-based energy consulting company. Erik holds a Master's degree in Public Policy from Harvard's Kennedy School and a Bachelor of Arts in Environmental Science from the University of Colorado at Boulder.
17:00
Reception
Friday 22 April 2011
08:45
Registration
09:30
Welcome Address
09:45
Morning Keynote
10:30
Break
10:45
READ MORE »
Bending the Water Cost Curve: Innovations to Avert Water Crisis
READ MORE »
Reviving New England's Fishing Economy
READ MORE »
Sustainability in the Built Environment: Integrating Transport Planning with Land Use and Building Design
12:05
Lunch and Expo
13:05
Afternoon Keynote
13:50
Break
14:05
READ MORE »
Building a Regional Food System
READ MORE »
All Linked Together: Sustainable Supply Chains
READ MORE »
Closed Loop 102: Adopting a Zero-Waste Approach
READ MORE »
System Dynamics in Sustainability and Its Application to Climate Change Policies
15:25
Break
15:40
READ MORE »
The Future of Footprinting
READ MORE »
Economic Case For Sustainability
READ MORE »
Beyond Microfinance
17:00
Reception


Session descriptions


Bending the Water Cost Curve: Innovations to Avert Water Crisis

Inspired by the famous "water cost curves" in the 2030 Water Resources Group's "Charting Our Water Future" report, this panel will highlight businesses that are capitalizing on opportunities to mitigate future water supply-demand imbalances. Panelists will discuss the solutions their firms have developed to reduce agricultural, industrial or municipal water demand and/or increasing water supply.
Marc Bracken
VP AND GENERAL MANAGER, Echologics
With more than 18 years of experience in acoustical and vibration engineering, Marc Bracken is vice president and general manager of Toronto-based Echologics, a leader in the development of acoustic technologies that can detect underground leaks and assess the condition of water pipes without breaking ground. Since starting Echologics, Marc has led the company in taking new technologies to the market, overseeing the Research and Development that has advanced signal processing, sensor and hardware design of leak detection systems. Of particular focus, has been the development of a new acoustical correlation technology for leak detection in large diameter trunk mains, and advancement of a new pipe wall thickness assessment technology. Marc has presented numerous technical papers on leak detection and water pipe condition assessment. Marc received Bachelor and Master degrees in mechanical engineering from the University of Toronto.
John Briscoe
GORDON MCKAY PROF. OF THE PRACTICE OF ENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING, SEAS, Harvard University
John Briscoe is a Professor of the Practice of Environmental Engineering and Health at Harvard University. John's career has focused on the issues of water and economic development. He has worked: as an engineer in the water agencies of South Africa and Mozambique; as an epidemiologist at the Cholera Research Center in Bangladesh; as a professor of water resources at the University of North Carolina; and, for the past 20 years in a variety of policy and operational positions in the World Bank. Most recently he has served as the Bank’s Senior Water Advisor and the Country Director for Brazil. He received his Ph.D. in Environmental Engineering at Harvard University and his B.Sc. in Civil Engineering at the University of Cape Town, South Africa. In addition to the United States, Briscoe has lived in his native South Africa, Bangladesh, Mozambique, India and Brazil. He speaks English, Afrikaans, Bengali, Portuguese, and Spanish.
Jeff Fulgham
CSO, GE Water
Jeffrey J. Fulgham is the Chief Sustainability Officer and ecomagination Leader for GE Power & Water. In this role Jeff applies his 30 years of experience in the water industry to creating sustainable water solutions across GE’s global facilities and employees, driving sustainable water solutions to GE Water’s 50,000 global customers, and working through NGOs, partners and universities globally to create more sustainable communities.
Rob McGinnis
CO-FOUNDER AND CTO, Oasys Water
Dr. Rob McGinnis, is Co-Founder and Chief Technical Officer of Oasys. He is the inventor of the Oasys EOTM Desalination and Water Purification processes and co-inventor of the Oasys Osmotic Heat Engine and Osmotic Grid Storage systems, and is the primary author of more than a dozen patents in desalination, water purification, chemical separations, heat exchange, and membrane and module design. Dr. McGinnis’ work on osmotically driven membrane separation and power systems has been supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Naval Research, NAVSEA, Army TARDEC, Bureau of Reclamation, NASA, WaterCAMPWS, and the National Science Foundation. He earned his B.A. and his PhD in Environmental Engineering at Yale University.
Emilio Tenuta
DIRECTOR OF CORPORATE RESPONSIBILITY AND BRANDING, Nalco
Emilio Tenuta is currently Director of Corporate Sustainability and Branding for Nalco Company and has been with the company for 27 years. He is responsible for linking Nalco’s brand strategy with the sustainable solutions offered to more than 50,000 Nalco customers in over 130 countries. In the last two years he has forged strong partnerships with a number of NGO’s around managing water and energy risks in the industrial sector. Those organizations include World Wildlife Fund (WWF), Alliance for Water Stewardship (AWS) and World Economic Forum (WEF). He has more than 25 years of technical sales and marketing experience in various industries including Food and Beverage, Pharmaceutical, Primary Metals and Automotive. He holds a bachelor’s of science degree in chemistry from University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire and a master’s of business degree from Northwestern’s Kellogg School of Management.


Reviving New England's Fishing Economy

While fishing has played a critical role in New England's economy for centuries, overfishing has been depleting stocks of many important and tasty species of fish like cod and flounder, damaging coastal economies and marine ecosystems. Recently, sustainable fishing pioneers have improved the way fisheries are managed to allow fish stocks to rebuild and create a sustainable fishing economy for generations to come. Join representatives from both the fishing and environmental communities to discuss the problems of overfishing, why they are difficult to overcome, and how innovative solutions to fishery management are making a difference.
Jud Crawford
SCIENCE AND POLICY MANAGER, Northeast Fisheries Program, Pew Environmental Group
John D. Crawford, PhD. John is a biologist with the Pew Environment Group (PEG) where he manages science and policy matters for the group's Northeast fisheries campaigns. John came to the PEG in 2008 from his position as senior scientist for Conservation Law Foundation. He directed the Initiative on Marine Ecosystem Conservation for six years, managing an international collaboration with WWF-Canada and mapping marine areas of high value for protection of marine biodiversity in the Gulf of Maine region. John entered the environmental arena as a tenured professor at the University of Pennsylvania. His research focused on the behavior and physiology of fishes. He has published numerous peer reviewed papers and taught biology in several academic programs. He maintains his ties to academic science through an active affiliation with the Boston University Marine Program. John holds degrees from Duke University (BS), University of Pennsylvania (MS) and Cornell University (PhD). He is a native of New England where his first hand observation of ecological changes have fueled his passionate interest in marine conservation and the region's heritage.
Eric Hesse
CHAIRMAN, Cape Cod Commercial Hook Fishermen's Association
Glen Libby the chairman of the Midcoast Fisherman's Association, a non-profit group seeking to improve the lives of local fishermen. Currently a shrimp fisherman, Glen is part of a family of fishermen and was formerly a groundfisherman. Glen recently helped to organize the Port Clyde fishing cooperative, which allows fishermen to sell their catch directly to customers via a delivery subscription service and online sales. The fishermen use environmentally-friendly fishing gear and support sustainable fishing methods.
Glen Libby
CHAIRMAN, Midcoast Fishermen's Association
Glen Libby the chairman of the Midcoast Fisherman's Association, a non-profit group seeking to improve the lives of local fishermen. Currently a shrimp fisherman, Glen is part of a family of fishermen and was formerly a groundfisherman. Glen recently helped to organize the Port Clyde fishing cooperative, which allows fishermen to sell their catch directly to customers via a delivery subscription service and online sales. The fishermen use environmentally-friendly fishing gear and support sustainable fishing methods.
John Sterman
DIRECTOR, MIT System Dynamics Group
John D. Sterman is the Jay W. Forrester Professor of Management at the MIT Sloan School of Management and Director of MIT's System Dynamics Group. His research includes systems thinking and organizational learning, computer simulation of corporate strategy and public policy issues, and environmental sustainability. He is the author of many scholarly and popular articles on the challenges and opportunities facing organizations today, including the book Modeling for Organizational Learning, and the award-winning textbook Business Dynamics. Prof. Sterman's research centers on improving decision making in complex systems, including corporate strategy and operations, energy policy, public health, environmental sustainability, and climate change. He has pioneered the development of "management flight simulators" of corporate and economic systems. These flight simulators are now used by corporations, universities and governments around the world. His research ranges from the dynamics of organizational change and the implementation of sustainable improvement programs to climate change and the implementation of policies to promote a sustainable world. Prof. Sterman has twice been awarded the Jay W. Forrester Prize for the best published work in system dynamics, won an IBM Faculty Award, won the Accenture Award for the best paper of the year published in the California Management Review, has seven times won awards for teaching excellence, and was named one of the MIT Sloan School's "Outstanding Faculty" by the Business Week Guide to the Best Business Schools. He has been featured on public television's News Hour, National Public Radio's Marketplace, CBC television, Fortune, the Financial Times, Business Week, and other media for his research and innovative use of interactive simulations in management education and policymaking.


Sustainability in the Built Environment: Integrating Transport Planning with Land Use and Building Design

For much of the post-World War II era, transport policy focused on 'the concrete commons' has resulted in land use patterns that are not only energy and space intensive, but also dependent on continued economic growth for their viability. Recently however, the convergence of the lingering impacts of recession, demographic shift, and increasing environmental awareness has provided an opportunity to develop new paradigms and strategies for urban development and land use planning that are economically resilient, environmentally sustainable, and socially equitable. How can and should transport policy be leveraged to promote such development patterns, given its inseparability from land use policy as demonstrated throughout the history of cities and regions in the United States and abroad?
Joe Coughlin
DIRECTOR, MIT AgeLab; lecturer, Engineering Systems Division & Dept. of Urban studies and planning
Joseph F. Coughlin, founder and Director of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology AgeLab, teaches strategic management, planning and public policy in the Engineering Systems Division and the Department of Urban Studies & Planning at MIT. His research, which he features on his blog Disruptive Demographics, focuses on how the convergence of baby boomer expectations and technology will shape the future of public policy and drive innovation across global industries including the financial services, insurance, health, IT, telecommunications, automobile and retail sectors.
Yonah Freemark
GRADUATE STUDENT, MIT Dept. of urban studies and planning and Editor, The Transport Politic
Yonah Freemark is currently a graduate student at the Department of Urban Studies and Planning of the MIT School of Architecture and Planning. An Urban Leaders Fellow sponsored by the Rockefeller Foundation, he writes for The Transport Politic, a blog on current issues in transport policy and planning, and the column Grassroutes for Next American City.
Diana Lind
EDITOR AT LARGE, Next American City and Founder, New Cities Foundation
Diana Lind is the current editor at large for Next American City, for which she was also editor in chief from 2008 to 2010. During her tenure at Next American City, she started the URBANEXUS monthly event series, the Next American Vanguard fellowship program, the annual Open Cities conference and oversaw a doubling of the magazine's subscribers and ad pages. She remains the host of Metro Matters, a monthly podcast in collaboration with the Brookings Institution. Since receiving her B.A. in English from Cornell University and her M.F.A. in Creative Writing from Columbia University, she has been an instructor or lecturer at numerous universities including Columbia University, Drexel University, Rutgers University-Camden and the University of Windsor, and her work has been profiled in The New York Times, Monocle and PAPER among other publications. She was born in Manhattan in 1981.
Susanne Rasmussen
DIRECTOR OF ENVIRONMENTAL AND TRANSPORTATION PLANNING, City of Cambridge
Susanne Rasmussen is director of the Environmental and Transportation Planning Division in the Cambridge Community Development Department and has more than 20 years of experience in the implementation of environmental policies and programs. She is responsible for the city's efforts to reduce greenhouse gas emissions through the Cities for Climate Protection program and for developing programs to engage residents and business in this effort. She oversees the development of new transportation policies and implementation of a variety of transportation programs and projects such as large multi-modal roadway projects, traffic calming, and transportation demand management. Prior to joining the City of Cambridge Ms. Rasmussen was a senior manager for a non-profit energy service company and a land use planner in a major metropolitan city. Ms. Rasmussen obtained a master's degree in City Planning from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1989 and a master's in Civil Engineering and Planning from the University of Aalborg in Denmark in 1987.


Building a Regional Food System

With obesity approaching epidemic status, millions of people living in food deserts with limited access to healthy and affordable food, and farmers struggling to make ends meet, the US food system is broken. This panel explores how shifting to a regional food system may be able to address some of the key problems with our current food system and ultimately improve public health. Participants will think critically about the challenges to implementing a regional food system and highlight a few innovative companies that are making great strides in regional sourcing, like Bon Appetit Management Compay and Chipotle.
Maisie Greenawalt
VP OF SUSTAINABILITY, Bon Appetit Management Company
Maisie Greenawalt oversees Bon Appétit Management Company’s culinary development and purchasing policy initiatives, and leads Bon Appétit’s marketing and communications efforts. Maisie has helped conceptualize and develop the Farm to Fork program, the Eat Local Challenge, and Low Carbon Diet Day. She has taken a leadership role in setting food procurement policies for Bon Appetit, driving policy to only purchase poultry raised without non-therapeutic antibiotics and Certified Humane and cage-free shell eggs. Maisie has recently been navigating the issue of farm worker rights and collaborated with CEO Fedele Bauccio to usher in a sweeping code of conduct for the company’s tomato suppliers as it relates to farm worker rights. Additionally, Maisie is president of the Bon Appétit Management Company Foundation, whose mission is to educate people about how their food choices affect the global environment and local economies.
Ken Kaplan
ASSOCIATE DIRECTOR AND CO-FOUNDER, MIT Collaborative Initiatives
Ken Kaplan serves as Associate Director of MIT Collaborative Initiatives. Earlier at MIT, Kaplan was a Principal Research Scientist in the Department of Architecture and Planning, and a member of the Research Laboratory of Electronics. There he led several design-integration projects, including the Surgical Room of the Future Project and an investigation of technology transfer from DOD to civilian healthcare applications.

Kaplan became an architect after an earlier career as a psychiatric social worker. These two professions give him a unique perspective on how systems and people work and interact. His experience includes architectural design, teaching, writing, and research; social work; and healthcare system design. Kaplan received his Masters in Psychiatric Social Work from New York University. After several years of social work research and practice, he earned a Masters in Architecture and a Masters in Historic Preservation from Columbia University, where he was awarded the Alpha Rho Chi medal for leadership. He has held professorships at the Graduate School of Architecture, Planning and Preservation at Columbia University, as well as the Graduate School of Design at Harvard University.
Fred Kirschenmann
PRESIDENT, Stone Barns Center for Food and Agriculture
Fred is the Distinguished Fellow at the Leopold Center for Sustainable Agriculture and the President of Stone Barn Center for Food and Agriculture. He also manages his family's 2,600-acre certified organic farm in south central North Dakota and helped found Farm Verified Organic, Inc., a private certification agency, and the Northern Plains Sustainable Agriculture Society. Fred is convening chair of a multi-state task force, Agriculture of the Middle, that focuses on research and markets for midsize American farms. The group also has established the Association of Family Farms to create standards and markets for these types of food. Fred has been appointed to several boards, including USDA's National Organic Standards Board, the North Central Region's Sustainable Agriculture Research and Education (SARE) administrative council, Henry A. Wallace Institute for Alternative Agriculture board of directors. He also served a three-year appointment on the National Commission on Industrial Farm Animal Production operated by the Johns Hopkins School of Public Health and funded by Pew Charitable Trusts. Fred has authored numerous articles and book chapters dealing with ethics and agriculture and holds degrees from Yankton College in South Dakota, Hartford Theological Seminary in Connecticut, and a Ph.D. in philosophy from the University of Chicago.
Bob Martin
SENIOR OFFICER, Pew Environmental Group
Bob Martin is a senior officer at the Pew Environment Group and previously was the Executive Director of the Pew Commission on Industrial Farm Animal Production, a two year study funded by The Pew Charitable Trusts by a grant to Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public. The charge to the Commission was to recommend solutions to the problems caused by concentrated animal feeding operations in the areas of public health, the environment, rural communities, and animal welfare. The Commission’s final report, Putting Meat on the Table: Industrial Farm Animal Production in America, was release on April 28, 2008.

Martin, a native of Kansas, grew up in South Dakota and is a Phi Beta Kappa graduate of the University of South Dakota. After graduation, he worked as a general assignment newspaper report in Pennsylvania and then for the Kansas Farmers Union. He has more than 30 years experience in public policy and politics at both the federal and state levels. Previously, he worked for former South Dakota Senators George McGovern, Jim Abourezk, Tom Daschle, and current Senator Tim Johnson. In addition, he worked for then Kansas Congressman Dan Glickman, as well as for members of the Kansas Senate Democratic Caucus.

Martin is married and he and his wife have a college age daughter.


All Linked Together: Sustainable Supply Chains

What do agriculture, biotechnology, and retail have in common? They all draw on natural resources to produce products, and they all dispose of waste on the same finite planet. What else? What crossover is there between disparate industries and what can they learn from each other? How do their definitions of sustainability lead them to implement sustainability initiatives in different ways? Companies in the same or similar sectors usually look to each other to learn about best practices. The purpose of the session is to showcase innovative organizations in varied sectors that support sustainable supply chains and to cross-pollinate best practices. The panel aims to challenge the participants to consider how it is that an industry's definition of sustainability drives its actions.
Barbra Batshalom
FOUNDER AND CEO, The Green Roundtable, Inc.
Barbra Batshalom is a serial social entrepreneur and a leader in the green building industry. With 20 years of experience in architecture, policy, consulting, strategy and business development, Barbra has consistently identified challenges and formulated business solutions that transform the market; doing well by doing good. In 1998 Barbra was the founder of The Green Roundtable, a not-just-for-profit company consulting to government, institutional and private clients in real estate. She created the NEXUS Green Building Resource Center, which became a model for franchise and the SPI Green Firm certification, evaluating the capabilities of private sector design and construction companies to deliver consistent, high quality sustainability services. Barbra is a compulsive systems-thinker with a unique talent to solve critical problems facing our world by integrating social, economic and environmental solutions.
Edgar Blanco
RESEARCH DIRECTOR, MIT Center for Transportation & Logistics; Exec. Director, MIT SCALE Latin America
Dr. Edgar Blanco is a Research Director at the MIT Center for Transportation & Logistics and is the Executive Director of the MIT SCALE Network in Latin America. His current research focus is the design of environmentally efficient supply chains. He also leads research initiatives on supply chain innovations in emerging markets, disruptive mobile technologies in value chains and optimization of humanitarian operations. Dr. Blanco has over thirteen years of experience in designing and improving logistics and supply chain systems, including the application of operations research techniques, statistical methods, GIS technologies and software solutions to deliver significant savings in business operations. Prior to joining MIT, he was leading the Inventory Optimization practice at Retek (now Oracle Retail). He received his Ph.D. from the School of Industrial and Systems Engineering at the Georgia Institute of Technology. His educational background includes a B.S. and M.S. in Industrial Engineering from Universidad de los Andes (Bogotá, Colombia) and a M.S. in Operations Research from the Georgia Institute of Technology.
Deverl Maserang
VICE PRESIDENT, NA Product Supply & Logistics, Chiquita Brands International
Mr. Deverl Maserang is currently Vice President, NA Product Supply & Logistics for Chiquita Brands International, headquartered in Cincinnati, Ohio. Mr. Maserang is responsible for operations at all Chiquita U.S. Ports and Warehousing Distribution Centers, as well as Logistics Planning and the North America banana and salad Transportation Network. He recently assumed responsibility for all global supply chain operations for the Chiquita Fruit Ingredients Division in Central and South America. Prior to joining Chiquita, Mr. Maserang held a number of increasingly responsible positions at United Parcel Service, Pepsi Bottling Group, and various start-ups in the area of Industrial Engineering, Operations, and Supply Chain Management. A native of Texas, he joined Chiquita in 2003 post restructuring to assist in the transformation of the business. Mr. Maserang holds a degree from Texas Tech University, Lubbock, in Industrial Engineering.
James Salo
SENIOR VICE PRESIDENT, Strategy and Research, Trucost
James (Jamie) Salo is the Vice President, Strategy and Research of the environmental data firm Trucost. Trucost provides data and analysis on company emissions and natural resource usage and presents these in financial as well as quantity terms, providing the basis for an improved dialogue between companies, investors and other stakeholders. At Trucost, James has been the research lead in a number of large client and public environmental research projects for Trucost including the Carbon Counts Asia 2007 report released at Bali, produced for the International Finance Corporation (IFC) which examined the carbon footprints of over 90 mutual funds and the MSCI Asia ex-Japan index. James earned DPhil from Oxford University from the Oxford University Centre of the Environment (OUCE).


Closed Loop 102: Adopting a Zero-Waste Approach

Positive waste reduction efforts such as improved recycling programs and renewable material innovations indicate that trash is receiving greater widespread attention, but there is still much work to be done. Waste streams and material life cycles are a mystery to most, making the "out of sight, out of mind" mentality the common mode of thinking about trash. This highlights the need to explicate the complex cycles related to the effects of consumption, meaning where products come from and where they end up. Building on last year's "Closed Loop 101" discussion that questioned the feasibility of reaching zero waste, this year's panel will focus on turning the idea into practice. Distinguished professionals across disciplines ranging from media to the public sector will share key strategies, personal accounts, pivotal moments, and lessons learned on their path to adopting zero-waste approaches.
John Fischer
BRANCH CHIEF, Waste Planning and Commercial Waste Reduction (MassDEP)
John Fischer is Branch Chief for Commercial Waste Reduction and Waste Planning at the Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection (MassDEP). In this position, he oversees development and implementation of Massachusetts’ Solid Waste Master Plan, solid waste and recycling data, the Solid Waste Advisory Committee, and disaster debris planning. John also coordinates MassDEP’s programs to advance waste reduction, recycling, and composting by businesses and institutions in Massachusetts. John has worked at MassDEP since 1998, including several years managing MassDEP’s implementation of the Toxics Use Reduction Act. Prior to joining MassDEP, John worked on solid waste and recycling policy issues as Assistant Director of Waste Policy at the Massachusetts Executive Office of Environmental Affairs. John holds a Bachelor’s degree in Human Ecology from Connecticut College and a Master’s in City Planning, focusing on Environmental Policy and Planning, from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.
Randi Mail
DIRECTOR OF RECYCLING, Cambridge Dept. of Public Works
Since 2002, Randi Mail has been the Recycling Director for the City of Cambridge. Before working for Cambridge she worked for Green Gold, an economic development corporation based Buffalo which worked to establish the Western New York region as an hub for green commerce. Her passion for environmental solutions continues to inspire others to adopt sustainable behaviors and work together on larger projects.
Pablo Rey Mazón
FOUNDER, Basurama
Pablo Rey Mazón has worked with Basurama (Trash-o-rama) since its foundation in 2001. Basurama is an association for the discussion, research and production on waste and reuse in every all formats and possible meanings. Basurama's activities range from workshops and multimedia production to interventions in public space and curatorial projects, always having trash as the common factor. Basurama has just finished Urban Solid Waste, a series of public art projects in Latin America in collaboration with AECID (Spanish Agency for International Development Cooperation) focused on waste, local agents and public space. Pablo's work in Basurama is mainly centered in processes associated with the metabolism of the cities in a territorial scale; the role of the informal sector in waste management systems; and the projects for the geolocation of waste as a resource. As a photographer he is now developing 6000km.org, a project that, through geotagged panorama photos, researches about the landscapes that the Spanish real estate crisis has left behind. In Basurama he has also developed spermola.org, a web for the free exchange of objects, as well as the project for the geolocation of waste material in the Ruhr Gebiet in Germany. He takes part in several independent research groups such as: Meipi, which develops the open source software meipi.org for participatory geo-blogging; Kulturometer.org, that researches cultural expenses in Madrid Region for the development of an analytic web visualization tool; Montera34, a web-design studio that develops organization and visualization tools. He has researched the links between Typography and Architecture and has been teacher of black and white photography.

Pablo Rey Mazón holds a Master in Architecture from the Escuela Técnica Superior de Arquitectura de Madrid and has also studied in the Technische Universität Dresden in Germany. He is now living in Boston and developing projects for Basurama in the US.
Libby McDonald
COLAB MIT, Documentary FilmmakeR AND AUTHOr
As Community Innovator Lab's Green Hub Global Program Associate Libby McDonald works in waste management and recycling in Central and South America. A writer and documentary filmmaker, she most recently published the book The Toxic Sandbox: The Truth About Environmental Toxins and Our Children's Health (Penguin, 2007) and was featured on more than 60 radio shows, talking about how environmental pollutants impact the social, cognitive, and physical development of our children. Libby has written, directed, and produced film and television for two decades. Film and TV credits include New School Order (Sundance Film Festival Official Entry & national PBS broadcast), The Forbidden Land (National PBS Broadcast), and Terror Town (funded by ITVS). An advocate for children, Libby launched and served as director of The Learning Community Charter School, a K-8 public school in Jersey City, New Jersey and Lakeside Preschool, a Waldorf-inspired school in the Adirondack Mountains.
Adam Mitchell
PARTNER, SaveThatStufF, Inc.
Mr. Mitchell began his recycling career in Boston in 1988. Mr. Mitchell spent the 1990's in New York City first as a consultant with the Sanitation Department, and later becoming a Vice President with Eastern Waste Services (EWS). Mr. Mitchell returned to Boston in 2000 to become a Partner at Save That Stuff, Inc., Mr. Mitchell has diversified the company's business line to include the collection of office paper, organic waste, and co-mingled containers. Mr. Mitchell is recognized regionally as an innovator in setting up sustainable waste recycling collection systems.


System Dynamics in Sustainability and Its Application to Climate Change Policies

System dynamics is a methodology for studying and managing complex feedback systems, such as one finds in business and other social systems (Source: System Dynamics Society). In this session we will give you an overview of this methodology, its relationship to sustainability issues and its applicability to define climate change policies through the C-ROADS "Common Platform" simulation. The C-ROADS is designed to help climate analysts improve their understanding of how various proposals to the UNFCCC will impact climate outcomes, is based on the biogeophysical and integrated assessment literature and includes representations of the carbon cycle, other GHGs, radiative forcing, global mean surface temperature, and sea level change.
Travis Franck
POSTDOCTORAL RESEARCH FELLOW, The Fletcher School/Tufts University
Dr. Travis Franck works at the not-for-profit Climate Interactive, whose mission is to provide a deeper understanding of climate and energy issues to decision-makers through the creation of interactive real-time decision support tools. As a Senior Scientist and Policy Analyst, he works with international stakeholders in the public and private sectors. Previously he has worked at the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) in Paris and has contributed to three UNFCCC COP meetings. An expert modeler and communicator, he has presented in many different forums, including World Bank, UNDP, engineering, and climate conferences. Travis received his PhD in Technology, Management & Policy at MIT, where he researched the impact of tropical storms and sea-level rise on coastal communities.
PJ Lamberson
SENIOR LECTURER, MIT Sloan School of Management
PJ Lamberson is a Senior Lecturer at the MIT Sloan School of Management and a Visiting Scholar at the Northwestern University Kellogg School of Management and the Northwestern University Institute on Complex Systems (NICO). He received his PhD in mathematics from Columbia University and was a postdoctoral Research Fellow at the Center for the Study of Complex Systems at the University of Michigan. His research examines complex systems in economics, management, political science, ecology, and public health.


The Future of Footprinting

In this panel, business leaders will discuss how they are developing and utilizing cutting-edge tools and methodologies to footprint their carbon, water, and materials use throughout the operations chain. Panelists will also be asked to reflect on how footprinting might change in the years ahead: will/should footprinting metrics be standardized and mandated within industries? Should products sold to consumers be required to show their embedded footprint? How can business translate footprinting metrics into effective reductions in environmental impact?
Taha Balafrej
DIRECTOR OF ENVIRONMENT AND SUSTAINABILITY, OCP Group
Holder of a Ph.D. in Mathematics, Taha Balafrej was a professor at the University, before joining the cabinet of the Minister of Environment and urban planning for 3 years. In 2002 he was appointed Director in charge of partnership, communication and cooperation at the Dept. of Environment. In that position, he managed the fund of industrial pollution control and developed the environmental policy in capacity and awareness building. For six years, he has been the focal point of Morocco to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) and negotiated the environmental chapter of the Free-Trade Agreement between Morocco and the USA. He also was member of the Bureau of the UNFCCC for two years and founded the Moroccan Authority for the Clean Development Mechanism. Mr. Balafrej is the author of several articles in the press and made various presentations about Climate, Environment and Sustainable Development issues both at national and international level.
Gina Balunas
SR. DIRECTOR FOR VALUE CHAIN COMPLIANCE & ENVIRONMENTAL SUSTAINABILITY, Cisco Systems
Gina Balunas is the Senior Director for Value Chain Compliance & Environmental Sustainability at Cisco Systems. In her current role, Gina leads a team that is developing an industry-leading platform to ensure environmental sustainability as a key part of Cisco’s product lifecycle management process. Her team identifies, drives and captures benefits such as reduction and reuse of packaging, optimization of take-back , de-materialization, design for sustainability; and carbon-footprint reduction in the extended supply chain. The team’s objectives are to ensure that all Cisco products can be sourced, manufactured, sold and taken back in a compliant & environmentally responsible manner. Gina has 25 years in the supply chain industry. During her ten years at Cisco, Gina has played a critical role in driving supply chain strategy, sourcing, technology alignment, productivity and quality management. Over the past five years, she has held leadership positions in Global Supply Management . Prior to her career at Cisco, Gina spent five years at Benchmark Electronics, a global EMS company, where she held various executive management positions, including Vice President of Materials Management for the company’s Hudson, New Hampshire operation. While at Benchmark, she worked in the areas of procurement, materials management and operations. Gina has built her career in the Boston area and holds a degree in Economics and Computer Science from Framingham State University. Gina also sits on the MIT-LGO Operating Committee.
Jon Dettling
DIRECTOR OF US OPERATIONS, Quantis
Jon Dettling is the US Director for Quantis, an industry-leading consulting firm that specializes in helping companies measure, understand, manage and make known aspects of the environmental sustainability of their products, services and operations. He has a decade’s professional experience in leading applications of life cycle assessment, chemical management and environmental impact assessment. Mr. Dettling has been a member of working groups under the World Resource Institute’s Greenhouse Gas Protocol, of the Sustainability Consortium’s measurement sciences working group, on the Steering Team for the Global CEO Forum’s Project on Packaging, a reviewer for the International Journal of Life Cycle Assessment, and member of the technical committee of the American Center for Life Cycle Assessment. He has worked with a diverse range of leaders in in public and private enterprise, including as such organizations as the World Business Council for Sustainable Development, the Environmental Defense Fund, Pfizer, Steelcase, CalRecycle, Kraft Foods, Intel and many others. Mr. Dettling holds a Master’s degree from the University of Michigan’s School of Public Health in Environmental Health Sciences.
Karen Golmer
DIRECTOR OF RESPONSIBLE RESOURCE SOLUTIONS, Diversey
Karen Golmer is the Director of Responsible Resource Solutions for Diversey, Inc. Diversey is a leading expert in cleaning and sanitation for the food, beverage, commercial, institutional, lodging and laundry industries. Cleaning processes use a great deal of water and Diversey is serious about helping customers become more sustainable. The Responsible Resource Solutions team audits facilities’ to provide full water and energy profiles and recommends best practices to optimize processes, minimize resource use and reduce overall costs. A chemist with an MBA and more than 25 years experience with chemicals and equipment in industrial water and wastewater treatment, Karen has provided technical direction to start-up companies focused on water, including Clean Membranes, a local Boston company that recently received funding. Prior to Diversey, Karen led water treatment programs at various companies including GE Water and Process Technologies, Ecolab and Calgon Corporation, now part of NALCO.
Jeremy Gregory
RESEARCH ASSOCIATE, MIT Materials Science Lab
Jeremy Gregory is a research scientist in the Materials Systems Laboratory and the Engineering Systems Division at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He studies the economic and environmental implications of engineering and system design decisions, particularly in the area of materials production and recovery systems. Research topics include electronics recycling, characterization of sustainable material systems, and product and firm environmental footprinting. He received his PhD and MS from MIT and BS from Montana State University-Bozeman, all in mechanical engineering.


Economic Case For Sustainability

Corporations are pursuing sustainability for a host of reasons: improving operations, reducing risk, accessing new customers, fulfilling a mission. For some, there is a real or perceived trade-off between sustainability and profitability, while for others, sustainability simply makes good business sense. How do companies make the economic case for sustainability, both internally and externally? To answer the latter, this session will consider the perspective of two influential groups: customers and investors. As these stakeholders are becoming more sophisticated, what proof are they demanding to back up sustainability claims, and how are companies communicating about their values and actions?
Amy Domini
FOUNDER, Domini Social Index and Domini Social Investments
Amy Domini is Founder and CEO of Domini Social Investments. She is widely recognized as the leading voice for socially responsible investing. In 2005, Time magazine named her to the Time 100 list of the world’s most influential people, and in 2009 Time listed her as one of 25 “Responsibility Pioneers” who are changing the world. Also in 2005, President Clinton honored her at the inaugural meeting of the Clinton Global Initiative helping protect children and the environment. In 2006, she was awarded a Doctor of Business Administration, honoris causa degree from Northeastern University College of Law. In 2007, she was awarded a Doctor of Humane Letters, honoris causa by the Berkeley Divinity School at Yale.

Ms. Domini is the author of Socially Responsible Investing: Making a Difference and Making Money (Dearborn Trade, 2001) and The Challenges of Wealth (Dow Jones Irwin, 1988), and a coauthor of Investing for Good (Harper Collins, 1993), The Social Investment Almanac (Henry Holt, 1992), and Ethical Investing (Addison-Wesley, 1984). Ms. Domini holds a B.A. in international and comparative studies from Boston University, and holds the Chartered Financial Analyst designation.
Michael Jacobson
DIRECTOR, Corporate Responsibility Office, Intel
Michael Jacobson is director of Intel’s Corporate Responsibility Office. In this role, he is responsible for leading Intel’s corporate responsibility strategy with stakeholders across the company. He has an experienced team of experts in corporate social responsibility, strategic alliances, marketing and communications, stakeholder management and reporting who are committed to building upon Intel’s performance as a leading corporate citizen.

Prior to this position Michael managed Intel’s Corporate Affairs team in California and Texas where he was responsible for leading corporate responsibility programs, philanthropic investments and public policy. Prior to Intel he served eight years in Washington DC where he served in senior positions in the executive branch and led economic development for Fort Worth, Texas. He is actively engaged in national and local community based organizations. Jacobson received his bachelor’s degree in Political Science from Baylor University. He resides in Folsom, CA with Kristen, his wife, and Jonathan, their 19 year old son who is attending Arizona State University.
Cary Krosinsky
SENIOR VICE PRESIDENT, TruCost
Based in the New York office, Cary acts as a senior representative for North America, advising financial and corporate clients. Prior to joining Trucost in June 2008, Cary was a member of CapitalBridge's Operations Committee, providing leadership on data and analytics. Whilst there, he worked in collaboration with Trucost on their award winning 2006 UK Trust Carbon Footprint study and the IFC sponsored Carbon Counts Asia 2007 report, the latter being issued at the December 2007 UN meetings in Bali. Cary is a member of the 70 person Expert Group that created the United Nations Principles for Responsible Investment (PRI), which has been committed to by over US$15 Trillion worth of asset managers and owners. He also co-edited and wrote the book ‘Sustainable Investing: The Art of Long Term Performance' with Nick Robins of HSBC, which features contributions from other leading practitioners.
Chris Park
LEAD PRINCIPAL, Sustainability & Climate Change Practice, Deloitte Consulting
Chris Park is a Principal in Deloitte’s Boston office and co-leads Deloitte’s Enterprise Sustainability practice. Chris joined Deloitte Consulting LLP’s Strategy & Operations practice in 1994. He is a registered architect by training, and in his consulting career, he has served clients in the life sciences, health care provider, manufacturing, higher education, financial services and retail industries. Chris is currently expanding Deloitte’s cross-functional service offerings around sustainability and corporate responsibility through the Enterprise Sustainability Integrated Market Offering (IMO), linking together traditional environmental, social responsibility and sustainability consulting under the umbrella of Deloitte’s FSSs. His primary focus in the sustainability arena is strategy, policy, performance management, operations and implementation planning.

Recognizing the increasing importance of improved social and environmental performance, Chris is defining elements of the “Wholly Sustainable Enterprise”. These services are intended to provide clients a structured approach and framework to drive business case and value initiatives that support sustainability, environmental and CSR activities. Chris has an MBA, MArch and BArch from the University of Michigan.
Jeff Shames
SENIOR LECTURER IN FINANCE, MIT Sloan
Jeffrey Shames is the retired chairman of MFS Investment Management and the boards of trustees of the MFS Funds. He is Executive in Residence at the MIT Sloan School of Management and serves on the Institute's advisory council for the MIT Leadership Center. Shames joined MFS in 1983 as an industry analyst and was named a portfolio manager in 1985, Chief Equity Officer in 1987, President and a member of the board in 1993, and Chairman and Chief Executive Officer in 1998. In September 2002, he retired as CEO and retained the title of Chairman until his retirement in February 2004. He graduated from Wesleyan University in 1977 and the MIT Sloan School in 1983. In between college and graduate school, he served as a Peace Corps volunteer in Fiji and with the U.S. Department of Agriculture in Washington, D.C. He is a member of the Board of Trustees of the Berklee College of Music, the Board of Trustees of City Year, the Board of Trustees of the X Prize Foundation, and the Board of Directors of Elan PLC.


Beyond Microfinance

Microfinance has exploded into the public consciousness in recent years. With organizations such as Grameen Bank and Kiva becoming more mainstream, the next question sustainable finance academics and practitioners alike should be asking themselves is: what’s next? The purpose of the panel is to showcase innovative organizations and their business models that support financial sustainability beyond microfinance. The panel aims to challenge participants to think of ways to build on the successes of the microfinance model to bring creative and sustainable financial solutions to some of the world’s most pressing social problems.
Erica Dorn
MANAGER OF VOLUNTEER PARTNERSHIPS, ACCION USA
Erica is the Manager of Volunteer Partnerships at ACCION. Her work is targeted at building up the capacity and awareness of ACCION by harnessing the capacity and leadership of volunteers and students. Her curiosity has brought her across the globe to master the Spanish language in South America, to study yoga and Buddhism in India, and to teach English to the Chilean Navy, and later to children in South Korea. In 2006, Erica founded a community organization based in Brooklyn that aided redevelopment in New Orleans; it was through this project that she found her passion for localized development initiatives. Following her interest in domestic microfinance she served as Kiva's first U.S. based fellow at ACCION USA in New York City. Erica holds a B.A. in Spanish and International Studies from Colorado State University. Find her on twitter @eldorn.
Kristin Kim
FOUNDER, Sansori
Kristin founded Sansori because our times call for a reimagining of the American ideal – the idea that each person, regardless of one's color, gender, or class, has a gift to share and contribute toward the common good. She envisions a global model of education that lives up to this ideal, embracing all women and men around the world, breaking down barriers and transforming lives. Through Sansori, where students gain tools for financial, organizational, and inner sustainability and launch social enterprises, Kristin hopes to collaborate with others who are transforming the world. At Sansori, Kristin is integrating the best of both private and not-for-profit experiences she's had. She was president of AllLearn, an online educational venture among Oxford, Stanford, and Yale Universities, that served over 11,000 students from over 75 countries. As Director for New Initiatives for Harvard University's Kennedy School of Government, she was instrumental in developing the Women's Leadership Board. She also practiced law at Simpson Thacher & Bartlett's New York and London offices, and specialized in international capital market transactions. Kristin received her J.D. from Harvard Law School and her A.B. from Bryn Mawr College, cum laude, in Chinese Philosophy. She currently serves on the Board of RAIT Investment Trust (NYSE: RAS). She has also served on the Board of Trustees of Bryn Mawr College and many other non-profit boards.
Beth Richardson
DIRECTOR OF GIIRS, B Lab
At B Lab, Beth Richardson is overseeing the launch of GIIRS (the Global Impact Investing Ratings System). GIIRS is a ratings agency that provides companies and funds with social and environmental performance ratings. Beth has worked closely with social entrepreneurs and social enterprise throughout her career. Beth has held roles at Self-Help, a leading community development bank, Ashoka: Innovators for the Public, a non-profit that supports social entrepreneurs in more than 60 countries, and the Amy Biehl Foundation Trust in Cape Town, South Africa. Beth grew up outside of Boston and earned her bachelor's degree from Duke University and her MBA from Kenan-Flagler. Beth now lives in Carrboro, NC with her husband Steven.
Erik Wurster
CARBON FINANCE MANAGER, E+Co.
Erik co-founded E+Co's carbon offset program, a wholly-owned subsidiary called E+Carbon, Inc. In addition to overseeing the work of carbon finance staff, Erik develops carbon finance projects. In Mali and Ghana, Erik developed some of the world's first carbon finance projects involving household cook stove technology in accordance with the Gold Standard. In addition, Erik was instrumental in forging E+Co's carbon finance partnership with Goldman Sachs. Prior to joining E+Co, Erik worked as a consultant for the United Nations Development Programme's sustainable energy department and a Norway-based energy consulting company. Erik holds a Master's degree in Public Policy from Harvard's Kennedy School and a Bachelor of Arts in Environmental Science from the University of Colorado at Boulder.