Program

Below is the program from the 2013 MIT Sustainability Summit.

Saturday 27 April 2013
8:00 AM
Registration and Breakfast
9:00 AM
Opening Remarks
9:15 AM
Introductory Keynote

Location: MPR

John Sterman
Director, MIT System Dynamics Group
John D. Sterman is the Jay W. Forrester Professor of Management at the MIT Sloan School of Management and Director of MIT's System Dynamics Group. His research includes systems thinking and organizational learning, computer simulation of corporate strategy and public policy issues, and environmental sustainability. He is the author of many scholarly and popular articles on the challenges and opportunities facing organizations today, including the book Modeling for Organizational Learning, and the award-winning textbook Business Dynamics. Prof. Sterman's research centers on improving decision making in complex systems, including corporate strategy and operations, energy policy, public health, environmental sustainability, and climate change. He has pioneered the development of "management flight simulators" of corporate and economic systems. These flight simulators are now used by corporations, universities and governments around the world. His research ranges from the dynamics of organizational change and the implementation of sustainable improvement programs to climate change and the implementation of policies to promote a sustainable world. Prof. Sterman has twice been awarded the Jay W. Forrester Prize for the best published work in system dynamics, won an IBM Faculty Award, won the Accenture Award for the best paper of the year published in the California Management Review, has seven times won awards for teaching excellence, and was named one of the MIT Sloan School's "Outstanding Faculty" by the Business Week Guide to the Best Business Schools. He has been featured on public television's News Hour, National Public Radio's Marketplace, CBC television, Fortune, the Financial Times, Business Week, and other media for his research and innovative use of interactive simulations in management education and policymaking.
9:45 AM
Featured Morning Keynote

Location: MPR

This year's MIT Sustainability Summit morning keynote will delivered by Rick Ridgeway, VP of Environmental Affairs at Patagonia. Rick will discuss Patagonia's work to reduce the environmental and social impact of apparel and footwear products around the world. He will speak about the company's role as a founding member of the Sustainable Apparel Coalition as well as discuss Patagonia's Common Threads Initiative, which aims to push consumers to reduce, repair, reuse, and as a last resort, recycle goods and products. We invite you to join us to learn more about how Patagonia is taking action toward a more sustainable future.
Rick Ridgeway
Vice President of Environmental Affairs, Patagonia
Rick Ridgeway is Patagonia’s Vice President of Environmental Affairs where he oversees vanguard environmental and sustainability initiatives including Freedom to Roam, Common Threads and the Footprint Chronicles. He also co-founded the Sustainable Apparel Coalition. In addition to business, Rick is recognized as a mountaineer and adventurer, making the first American ascent of K2. He has produced and directed several documentary films, written dozens of magazine articles and six books. National Geographic recently honored him with its "Lifetime Achievement in Adventure" award. Rick lives with his wife in Ojai, California, and they have three grown children.
10:45 AM
Coffee Break
11:00 AM
Making Green Products the Norm
This panel will explore the feasibility of widespread adoption of green products within various industries (primarily targeting consumer-facing industries). We will attempt to understand who the key stakeholders are in encouraging this shift towards green products and what the different roles / levels of interaction are currently between consumers, businesses, non-profits and governments / regulatory bodies.
Jon Dettling
Managing Director, United States, Quantis
Jon Dettling is the US Director for Quantis, where he provides a decade’s professional experience in leading applications of life cycle assessment, chemical management and environmental impact assessment within leading public and private sector groups. Mr. Dettling has been a member of working groups under the World Resource Institute’s Greenhouse Gas Protocol, of the Sustainability Consortium’s measurement sciences working group, on the Steering Team for the Global CEO Forum’s Project on Packaging, a reviewer for the International Journal of Life Cycle Assessment, a member of IEEE’s green engineering editorial board and member of the technical committee of the American Center for Life Cycle Assessment. He has worked with a diverse range of leaders in in public and private enterprise, including as such organizations as the World Business Council for Sustainable Development, the Environmental Defense Fund, Pfizer, Steelcase, CalRecycle, Kraft Foods, Intel and many others. He holds a Master’s degree from the University of Michigan in Environmental Health Sciences.
Michael Dupee
Vice President, Corporate Social Responsibility, Green Mountain Coffee Roasters
Michael leads GMCR’s sustainability efforts, including providing strategic direction and reporting publicly on its programs; managing GMCR’s portfolio of integrated sustainability initiatives and funded partner projects; and generating understanding of and recognition for GMCR’s sustainability work, internally and externally. Prior to this role, Michael was a Vice President at Goldman Sachs & Co., managing opportunistic investments in distressed financial assets. Michael holds Juris Doctor, cum laude, and Master of Business Administration degrees from Georgetown University and a B.A. in history, magna cum laude from Boston College.
Mark T. Petruzzi
Senior Vice President of Outreach and Strategic Relations, Green Seal
Mark leads Green Seal's engagement with purchasers, industry groups, trade associations and other external organizations that share Green Seal's goal of a more sustainable marketplace. Over the last 17 years, he has conducted research on the life cycle impacts of products and services, developed criteria to address key impacts, and evaluated products and services for compliance with Green Seal's standards in a wide range of product and service categories. Previously he directed Green Seal's Certification Program. He holds a B.S. in mechanical engineering and a M.S. in civil and environmental engineering from The George Washington University.
Rick Ridgeway
Vice President of Environmental Affairs, Patagonia
Rick Ridgeway is Patagonia’s Vice President of Environmental Affairs where he oversees vanguard environmental and sustainability initiatives including Freedom to Roam, Common Threads and the Footprint Chronicles. He also co-founded the Sustainable Apparel Coalition. In addition to business, Rick is recognized as a mountaineer and adventurer, making the first American ascent of K2. He has produced and directed several documentary films, written dozens of magazine articles and six books. National Geographic recently honored him with its "Lifetime Achievement in Adventure" award. Rick lives with his wife in Ojai, California, and they have three grown children.
11:00 AM
Achieving triple-bottom line returns from innovative land use
Land conservation ensures that multiple public values endure on any particular property or region. This is especially true in urban settings, where land is at a premium and the needs of the public are more immediate; livability, access to green space, public safety, and urban vitality are deeply intertwined. This panel is convened by the Trust for Public Land, a leader in land conservation and livable communities especially in urban environments. The panel will highlight how local groups are creating “triple bottom line” open spaces to meet social, economic, and environmental goals.
Margaret Dyson
Director of Historic Parks, Muddy River Restoration Project
Margaret Dyson is the Director of Historic Parks for the Boston Parks and Recreation Department. She oversees planning, design and construction activities in over 1,100 acres designated historic parks in the city. In addition to traditional parks projects, Ms. Dyson has worked on a variety of complex, highly regulated and multi-jurisdictional projects including landfill closures, stormwater compliance, transportation linkage, and water quality monitoring. She is currently working on the Muddy River Restoration Project, a unique effort by federal, state, and local governments to improve flood control and enhance the environment by restoring an historic urban waterway. Ms. Dyson has served as a founding member of the Massachusetts Environmental Collaborative, on the Board of Directors of Preservation Action and as a corporate trustee of The Trustees of Reservation.
William "Buzz" Constable
Executive Vice President, A. W. Perry, Inc.
Buzz Constable is a founding Principal of Transit Realty Associates (TRA) as well as Executive Vice President of A.W. Perry Inc., a Boston-based real estate firm more than a century old. His focus on land and land use includes development and management of a million square feet of commercial property, and serving on numerous elected and appointed local and state boards and committees, including those associated with using Transit Oriented Development (TOD) to promote redevelopment and to finance large transportation projects. He has served as an officer and member of Boston’s Metropolitan Area Planning Council (MAPC) for twenty-five years, including more than a decade as Chairman of the MA Association of Regional Planning Agencies. Buzz is involved in local, state and federal land conservation programs, including serving as Trustee of The Trustees of Reservations (TTOR) and the Environmental League of Massachusetts (ELM). He has degrees from Williams, Yale, Boston University, and has been a Loeb Fellow at Harvard.
Kevin Essington
State Director, Trust for Public Land
Kevin Essington is the state director for The Trust for Public land in Massachusetts and Rhode Island. He is responsible for the effective delivery of all land conservation services in support of The Trust for Public Land’s mission. The Massachusetts conservation program consists of nine staff members with project management, program leadership, lobbying, legal, administrative, marketing, and fundraising experience. Prior to this position Kevin worked for 10 years for The Nature Conservancy in Rhode Island and Connecticut as director of government relations and as a local conservation program director. As government relations director he was responsible for promoting sound policies and adequate funding for federal programs in Rhode Island especially for coastal and marine ecosystems. As a program director he oversaw the protection of nearly 7,000 acres in seven years in the largest block of forest between Boston and New York City. Prior to that he led the establishment of the Montezuma Land Conservancy in the Mesa Verde area of southewest Colorado and was the environmental review coordinator for the Colorado Natural Heritage Program at Colorado State University. He has a degree in history from the University of Michigan and a masters degree in environmental policy from the University of Denver. He lives in East Greenwich, Rhode Island with his family.
Glynn Llloyd
Co-Founder, City Growers
11:00 AM
Investment and finance for sustainability and responsibility: Evidence from the field
One popular way to promote sustainable behavior is by preferential investment in companies that demonstrate desirable values. Nonetheless, the total amount of money invested in funds of this character is vanishingly small compared to the total value of the markets. This panel will cast a critical eye on this venue of action, asking questions about the different available models, strategies for mainstreaming these values, and any effects that can be seen in resource use, environmental impact, labor rules, etc. due to the models. Are these effects changes that would not have happened without such investment?
Katie Grace
Program Manager, Initiative for Responsible Investment, Harvard Kennedy School
Katie Grace is Program Manager at the Initiative for Responsible Investment, where she oversees office management and conducts research on public policy and impact investment, sustainable cities investment, and place-based frameworks for community development. She has authored or co-authored a number of works at the IRI, including the recent "Impact at Scale: Policy Innovation for Institutional Investment with Social and Environmental Benefit." Prior to coming to the IRI at the Hauser Center, she worked as a research analyst at the Tellus Institute on projects including the identification of key sustainability performance indicators for a major oil and gas company, market definition for a nonprofit launching a single global sustainable standard for products and services, and case study analysis of the effects of university endowments on employment and the community. Katie graduated with honors from Williams College with a BA, cum laude, in Political Science and a Concentration in Leadership Studies.
Lisa Hiserodt
Program Director, Leaders in Energy Efficiency Financing, Sustainable Endowments Institute
Rebecca Levanthal
Director, Business Development Team, Social Finance
Rebecca Leventhal leads Social Finance’s criminal justice work on the Social Impact Bond Development team. Social Finance, a nonprofit dedicated to mobilizing investment capital to drive social change, structures innovative investment instruments that generate both a positive social impact and a financial return. The Social Impact Bond, which is core to the firm’s currents efforts, is a public private nonprofit partnership that has been recognized for its potential to provide financing solutions to some of our more persistent social problems. Prior to Social Finance, Rebecca held roles in the public and private sector, working in government, politics, finance, and the nonprofit field. Rebecca collaborated with the Mississippi State Legislature and other government and non-government actors implementing health reform in Mississippi. Previously, she served in the Office of General Counsel in the Office of Management in Budget where she responded to federal regulatory and appropriations questions and on the U.S. Department of State's Policy Planning Staff. Throughout the past three years, Rebecca has been an ambassador for President William Jefferson Clinton throughout the world and across the United States in support of his political, charitable, and personal work. In this role, she has liaised and negotiated with a host of individuals, including: high-level officials in foreign governments; international organizations; political campaigns; local and state governments; and non-governmental organizations. Before law school, she spent 15 months working for Hillary Clinton’s presidential campaign, where she cultivated relationships with local communities in over 30 states and created earned media opportunities for the candidate. Rebecca began her career at Merrill Lynch in the Municipal Finance department where she financed state and local government institutions and nonprofit facilities and later joined the Structured Finance department where she arranged secured transactions. Rebecca holds a JD from Harvard Law School and an AB in Social Studies from Harvard College.
Annie White
Manager, Research Products, Sustainalytics
Annie is a senior sustainability lead at Sustainalytics in Boston where she overseas operations, sustainability research projects and the internship program. Annie leads Sustainalytics’ annual publication of socially responsible companies in partnership with Maclean’s magazine along with Newsweek magazine’s annual Green Rankings. Prior to joining Sustainalytics, Annie worked on furthering sustainability initiatives with lululemon athletica and was an economic analyst with the International Food Policy Research Institute in Washington, D.C. Annie holds a BA from the University of Western Ontario and an MA in Environmental Economics from the University of Glasgow.
12:15 PM
Lunch
1:15 PM
Featured Afternoon Keynote
This year's MIT Sustainability Summit afternoon keynote will be delivered by Katherine Gajewski, Director of the Mayor's Office of Sustainability for the City of Philadelphia. She will speak about her office's efforts to implement the ambitious and far-reaching Greenworks Philadelphia plan, which targets improvements in energy efficiency, air quality and greenhouse gas emissions, green infrastructure, and green economy jobs, among others. She will speak about successes and challenges both in achieving the goals of the plan and in developing new relationships with stakeholders both inside and outside of government necessary for the plan to be successful.
Katherine Gajewski
Director of Sustainability, City of Philadelphia
Katherine Gajewski is the Director of Sustainability for the City of Philadelphia. She leads the Mayor’s Office of Sustainability and is responsible for coordinating the implementation of Greenworks Philadelphia, the City's comprehensive sustainability plan. In this role she works with city government partners and external stakeholders to advance progress across 15 targeted goals. Since the plan was launched by Mayor Nutter in 2009, Greenworks has received broad support within Philadelphia, has garnered national and international attention and has positioned Philadelphia as a leader in urban sustainability. Katherine also serves as the Director of EnergyWorks, a comprehensive energy solutions program for home and commercial building owners.
2:00 PM
Getting products to customers in an environmentally-conscious world
Our global economy is linked together by phenomenally large and complex multi-modal logistics chains, moving raw materials, finished products, and waste around the world with astounding reliability, speed, and environmental impact. In the United States, new models of delivery are bringing the near-instant gratification of brick-and-mortar shopping to the convenience of online retail. As consumers increasingly demand sustainable products and practices, how are manufacturers and retailers (both brick & mortar and online) altering their logistics operations in response while maintaining the service levels their customers expect? What roles do transport and supply chain logistics play in a sustainable future? And what role can sustainability play in transport and supply chain logistics decisions?
Daniel Aronson
Founder, SustainabilityOS
Daniel Aronson is the founder of SustainablityOS, which creates tools and resources to make sustainability activities 95% faster. Daniel has been researching, writing, and consulting on the environment, social responsibility, and innovation for over 20 years. During his consulting career, he has led sustainability strategy consulting for Deloitte and IBM and has worked with global sustainability and responsibility leaders in apparel, health care, telecommunications, high technology, and many other industries.

Daniel has been a guest lecturer at Harvard Business School's class on strategic corporate citizenship and MIT’s Sustainability Lab, and has also authored and been interviewed for numerous publications (examples include how sustainability drives innovation, the sustainable value chain practices that lead to success, and ‘hard wiring’ sustainability into organizations).

He has also:
 Conducted the first research that examined which sustainable value chain practices actually work, made it possible for cities to set science-based carbon targets in hours instead of months
 Created much more sophisticated frameworks for types of sustainability-related customer-product fit (two dozen) and risk (1,000 distinct ones)
 Quantified (for the first time) the effect of sustainability leadership on innovation
 Cataloged dozens of different sustainability techniques (and their pros and cons), from common (e.g., substitution) to rare (e.g., transport-to-trade).

He serves on two board committees of the Corporate Responsibility Officers Association and as a member of the Social Responsibility Advisory Board of the American Society for Quality, the US home for ISO 26000.

Daniel holds an MBA from the MIT Sloan School of Management, and a BA with High Honors from UC Berkeley. He lives in the New York City area.

Representative clients: Nike, Johnson & Johnson (ranked #3 by CR Magazine), Autodesk (named #1 by Climate Counts), Interface (#3 globally according to GlobeScan) and Philips (#1 in the DJSI’s ranking of Industrial Conglomerates).
Edgar Blanco
Research Director, MIT Center for Transportation & Logistics
Dr. Edgar Blanco is a Research Director at the MIT Center for Transportation & Logistics and is the Executive Director of the MIT SCALE Network in Latin America. His current research focus is the design of environmentally efficient supply chains. He also leads research initiatives on supply chain innovations in emerging markets, logistics operations in megacities and disruptive mobile technologies in value chains.

Dr. Blanco has over thirteen years of experience in designing and improving logistics and supply chain systems, including the application of operations research techniques, statistical methods, GIS technologies and software solutions to deliver significant savings in business operations.

Prior to joining MIT, he was leading the Inventory Optimization practice at Retek (now Oracle Retail). He received his Ph.D. from the School of Industrial and Systems Engineering at the Georgia Institute of Technology. His educational background includes a B.S. and M.S. in Industrial Engineering from Universidad de los Andes (Bogotá, Colombia) and a M.S. in Operations Research from the Georgia Institute of Technology.
Mark Buckley
Vice President, Environmental Affairs, Staples, Inc.
Mark Buckley is vice president of environmental affairs for Staples, Inc. He directs Staples environmental commitment and sustainable business practices to protect and preserve natural resources. He is responsible for driving the company’s environmental leadership in four major areas: the purchase and promotion of recycled content products; chain-wide recycling initiatives; energy conservation programs and renewable power procurement; and educational initiatives for customers and associates. As a key part of his role, Mark oversees a strategic business plan that supports goals outlined by Staples environmental paper procurement policy. The policy formalizes the company’s commitment to protecting forest resources through environmentally sound paper procurement practices. In doing so, Mark serves as an important liaison with suppliers, environmental groups, paper industry groups and consultants.

A 22-year Staples veteran, Mark was previously vice president of facilities management and purchasing at Staples. His responsibilities included directing company-wide recycling and energy conservation programs, starting in 1993. He has also served as a key member of Staples Environmental Action Group. Prior to joining Staples, Mark held several leadership positions in the field of environmental management for Star Market, Continental Baking, General Environmental Services Inc. and the U.S. Department of Interior/Aquaculture Project. He holds a bachelor’s degree in biology from St. Anselm’s College and is an active member of several environmental groups for the state of Massachusetts.
Jim Bruce
Vice President, UPS Corporate Public Affairs
Jim Bruce has served UPS in Washington, D.C. for four years as Special Counsel, and now Vice President, working on issues related to energy policy, alternative fuel vehicles, and sustainability. Jim is on the UPS Working Committee on Sustainability. Prior to joining UPS, Jim was a partner at Wiley, Rein, LLP in the Government Policy Group in Washington, D.C., assisting corporate clients on energy legislation and federal procurement law. Before that, he was the Senior Counsel to the U.S. Senate Committee on Energy and Natural Resources with 13 years service. He graduated from Princeton University with a B.S.E. (with Honors) and M.S.E. in aerospace mechanical engineering (Master’s thesis in automatic feedback control systems). He received his J.D. from George Washington University Law School. He is a member of the District of Columbia Bar and is a registered patent attorney. He was honorably discharged as a captain in the U.S. Army Transportation Corps.
2:00 PM
Innovative Partnerships for Urban Sustainability
As is commonly cited, the world has reached an urbanization tipping point. While cities take up approximately 2% of landmass worldwide they represent over half of global population, two-thirds of the world's energy usage, and over 70% of the world's carbon emissions. Due to these impacts and the on-the-ground experience of climate change, city leaders are leading the world to a more sustainable future. While national governments have been slow to navigate the difficulties of climate change politics, urban innovators form the public, academic, and private sectors are making material progress. In addition to bold new ideas, however, sustainable change at the urban scale requires innovative partnerships between agencies and actors. During this session, attendees will hear from both thinkers and doers at a variety of scales who have developed creative solutions to pressing sustainability challenges while utilizing innovative partnerships to achieve their success.
Katherine Gajewski
Director of Sustainability, City of Philadelphia
Katherine Gajewski is the Director of Sustainability for the City of Philadelphia. She leads the Mayor’s Office of Sustainability and is responsible for coordinating the implementation of Greenworks Philadelphia, the City's comprehensive sustainability plan. In this role she works with city government partners and external stakeholders to advance progress across 15 targeted goals. Since the plan was launched by Mayor Nutter in 2009, Greenworks has received broad support within Philadelphia, has garnered national and international attention and has positioned Philadelphia as a leader in urban sustainability. Katherine also serves as the Director of EnergyWorks, a comprehensive energy solutions program for home and commercial building owners.
Caroline Howe
Director, Civic Consumption Program, Groundswell
Caroline Howe is the Director of Groundswell's Civic Consumption program, uniting organizations that drive higher environmental and social performance throughout the supply chain through aggregation of community demand. Groundswell has been demonstrating this model through their work leveraging the shared purchasing power of community groups to transform markets for electricity and energy efficiency from the bottom up. Caroline works with Groundswell to build the field of civic consumption, by convening other practitioners, collecting best practices, and identifying new ways to share the tools of civic consumption in new fields. She is also a Legatum Fellow in Entrepreneurship and Development at MIT, focused on solutions for waste management that leverage the power of communities, social entrepreneurs, and new recycling technologies.
Nigel Jacob
Co-Chair, Mayor's Office of New Urban Mechanics
With an extensive background in collaborative, citizen-facing technology projects, Nigel Jacob co-founded the Office of New Urban Mechanics -- a civic innovation incubator within Boston's City Hall. Nigel also serves as Mayor Menino's advisor on emerging technologies. In both of these roles, Nigel works to develop new models of innovation for cities in the 21st century. Prior to joining the City of Boston in 2006, Nigel worked for and launched a series of technology start-ups in the Boston area. Nigel is also a fellow at the Center for the Advancement Public Action at Bennington College. Nigel has received a number of awards for his ground breaking work in Boston, including being named a Public Official of the year in 2011 by Governing Magazine and the Tribeca Disruptive Innovation award for 2012.
Christoph Reinhart
Associate Professor in Building Technology, MIT
Christoph Reinhart is an Associate Professor in Building Technology at MIT where heads the Sustainable Design Lab. He works in the field of sustainable building design and environmental modeling and has particular expertise is in daylighting, passive climatization techniques and the influence of occupant behavior on building energy use. Before joining MIT in early 2012 he led the Sustainable Design Program at Harvard and was a staff scientist at the National Research Council of Canada. He holds a doctorate in architecture form the Technical University of Karlsruhe.
2:00 PM
Commitment to Action: How voluntary initiatives are changing the face of international sustainability
In the face of weakening international resolve for traditional top-down approaches to great global sustainability challenges such as climate change, bottom-up voluntary commitments may represent an increasingly important mode for stimulating action. The UN Conference on Sustainable Development (Rio+20) held in June 2012, for example, generated by some counts over $600 billion in new commitments toward sustainability, from governments, private sector, civil society and development banks. Other venues such as the Major Economies Forum have promise to stimulate real action on climate change by the world’s largest emitters. Panelists will discuss some of the major voluntary commitment models, outcomes of Rio+20, as well as mechanisms to track and generate more progress from all actors.
David Berry
Partner, Flagship Ventures, Inc.
David Berry joined Flagship in 2005 where he focuses on innovating, entrepreneuring, and investing in new ventures in life sciences and sustainability. He is a founder of Flagship portfolio companies LS9, Joule Unlimited, Eleven Biotherapeutics, Seres Health, Pronutria, among others. David was founding CEO of Joule and Pronutria. He was also a Board member of Flagship portfolio company CGI Pharmaceuticals (acquired by Gilead in 2010), and currently serves on the boards of Joule, Eleven, Seres and Pronutria. David previously completed his combined MD-PhD from Harvard Medical School and the MIT Biological Engineering Division in just over 5 years.

He has been recognized with over 50 awards and honors as an innovator including receiving the prestigious Lemelson-MIT Student Prize for invention and innovation, being named the Innovator of the Year by Technology Review, and being selected by the US State Department as 1 of 12 Innovators Helping to Reshape Realty. He also speaks across the globe on topics including innovation, sustainability, biotechnology, and entrepreneurship, including at the National Academies, for the Prince of Girona Foundation, and at Google Solve for X. David previously served on the MIT Corporation, its Board of Trustees, and currently serves on the boards of multiple not-for-profits in education and the arts, and has been appointed to the United Nations Sustainable Development Solution Network Leadership Council.
Jacob Scherr
Director, Global Strategy and Advocacy, Natural Resources Defense Council
S. Jacob Scherr is the director of global strategy and advocacy for NRDC in its Washington, D.C. office. Mr. Scherr has responsibility for overseeing international activities throughout the organization, including preparations for the Rio+20 “Earth Summit. During his career with NRDC since 1976, Mr. Scherr has served as director of the organization's international program, director of its BioGems initiative, and a senior attorney. He has worked extensively on a broad range of international environmental and nuclear issues. Mr. Scherr is a member of the boards of the Center for Global Development and the Herbert Scoville, Jr. Peace Fellowship. Mr. Scherr is a 1970 graduate of Wesleyan University in Middletown, Connecticut. In 1974, he received his J.D. with highest honors from the University of Maryland Law School in 1974.
Henrik Selin
Associate Professor, Department of International Relations, Boston University
Henrik Selin conducts research and teaches classes on global and regional politics and policy making on environment and sustainable development. His book Global Governance of Hazardous Chemicals: Challenges of Multilevel Management was recently published by MIT Press. Selin is the faculty coordinator for the IR & Environmental Policy program. He is also a Core Faculty member of the Center for Energy & Environmental Studies, Boston University, and an Affiliated Researcher with the Center for Climate Science and Policy Research, Linköping University. Prior to his current faculty position, Selin was a Wallenberg Research Fellow in Environment and Sustainability in the Environmental Policy and Planning Group, Department of Urban Studies and Planning, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (2001–04), an Associate with the Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, John F. Kennedy School of Government, Harvard University (2001–03), and an Associate with the Center for International Development, John F. Kennedy School of Government, Harvard University (2003–04).
3:15 PM
Coffee Break
3:30 PM
Doing More with What We Have: Business Opportunities in Excess Capacity and Collaborative Consumption
With the success of businesses such as Netflix and Zipcar the business model for collaborative consumption – organized systems of lending, sharing, bartering, and swapping instead of direct purchase - has been proven successful, but what other opportunities for application may be out there? This panel discusses the collaborative consumption movement, and features speakers utilizing this model to drive value to their customers while simultaneously maximizing the utility of both durable and less-tangible goods. Additionally, this panel presents a special focus on the challenges of establishing a new business within the collaborative consumption area, including experiences from our panelists, and the techniques they used to overcome those challenges.
Luka Carfagna
Sociology Department, Boston College
Lindsey "Luka" Carfagna is a doctoral student in the Sociology Department at Boston College, holds an M.A. in the Social Sciences from the University of Chicago, and double majored in Economics and Sociology at the University of Vermont, where she competed on the soccer and track teams. She works as a research assistant for Juliet Schor as part of the MacArthur Foundation’s Connected Learning Research Network and is currently studying open learning. She also helps Juliet Schor organize Summer Institutes in New Economics for PhD students looking to enter the emerging field. Luka’s research interests are in economic sociology and the sociology of education with specific focuses on cultural capital in digital spaces as well as how institutional and organizational mechanisms facilitate the reproduction of inequality. On the side, she contracts as a researcher for a few small consulting groups and is proficient in qualitative and quantitative research design, implementation, analysis, and reporting.
Ryan C. C. Chin
Managing Director and Research Scientist, MIT City Science Initiative
Dr. Ryan C.C. Chin is the managing director of the City Science Initiative at the MIT Media Lab. His research focuses on developing new urban systems for a post-oil, connected world. He earned his Ph.D. at the MIT Media Lab in 2012 by creating Mobility-on-Demand (MoD) Systems – a network of one-way shared-use lightweight electric vehicles (LEVs) enabled by electric charging infrastructure and smart fleet management systems. Under Dr. Chin’s leadership, the Smart Cities research group, developed a series of LEVs for MoD systems in collaboration with industry including the CityCar (with GM), RoboScooter (with SYM), and the GreenWheel Electric Bicycle.

Dr. Chin’s research led to the group’s first major publication, Reinventing the Automobile: Personal Urban Mobility for the 21st Century written by William J. Mitchell (his advisor), Chris Borroni-Bird (GM), and Lawrence Burns (GM) published by MIT Press in January of 2010. Dr. Chin also has led MIT’s collaboration with Hiriko, a new electric car manufacturer based in Spain, to develop a commercial version of the CityCar – A foldable, sharable, modular, electric two-passenger vehicle that utilizes four modular in-wheel electric motors with integrated steering and suspension (called Robot Wheels) – due for market release in the summer of 2013. Dr. Chin’s Ph.D. thesis entitled “Smart Customization: Making Evidence-Based Environmental Decisions” focused on the ability to improve the sustainability of products by utilizing Mass Customization strategies. Chin has been a keynote speaker and panelist at conferences like MIT’s Emerging Technologies Conference (EmTech), TEDx, SIGGRAPH, Convergence, China Planning Network (CPN), MIT World, and Gridweek. Dr. Chin at MIT earned a Master of Science in Media Arts and Sciences (2004), and a Master of Architecture (2000), and Bachelor’s degrees in Civil Engineering (1997) and Architecture (1997) from the Catholic University of America.
Mark Chase
Parking and Transportation Demand Consultant, Livable Streets Alliance
Mark has over fifteen years of Transportation planning experience in the public, private and non-profit sectors. His employment and consulting background includes work in transportation demand management initiatives including car-sharing programs, bicycle facilities planning, shuttle systems operations and parking management. Mark is a social entrepreneur who has been involved with the launch of several for-profit and non-profit enterprises. He was part of the senior management team that launched the innovative car-sharing program Zipcar and social networking car-pool site GoLoco. He co-founded Central Bike Services, a bicycle facility installation and maintenance company based in Boston. Mark is actively involved with car-parking reform as key component of sustainable transportation systems. Currently Mark undertakes contract consulting work for Nelson Nygaard Consulting Associates in New York City. He is an adviser and technical expert for the Livable Streets Alliance.
Antje Danielson
Co-Founder, Zipcar, Inc.
Antje Danielson is the Co-Founder of Zipcar where she shaped the vision, technology, operational procedures, and early business relations of the company. Zipcar is the world's leading car-sharing service with members throughout North American and Europe. As a leader in urban transportation, Zipcar offers vehicles to savvy city residents and businesses looking for an alternative to the hassles of owning a car.

Antje currently works at Tufts University where she directs the Institute of the Environment. Her area of expertise is climate change mitigation and environmental behavioral change. She serves on a number of advisory boards of companies and non-profit organizations. She has led interdisciplinary teams working on environmental issues since 1998 as a researcher, entrepreneur, and implementation practitioner.

Dr. Danielson was born and raised in Berlin Germany, where she received her Ph.D. in Geochemistry from the Freie Universität Berlin. She has worked and studied in many countries including South Africa, Italy, the UK, Canada, and the US. She enjoys gardening, sailing, and spending time with her children.
3:30 PM
Developing an Inclusive and Sustainable Waste Management Sector in Massachusetts
Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection (MassDEP) is in the process of implementing a ban on commercial and institutional entities sending food waste to landfills. There are several benefit on the landfills and farming industry by the implementation of this ban, but there are needs to be able to make this program work properly. The objective of this panel is to focus on the facts and challenges of implementing this waste ban as well as the steps being taken to create a "closed loop food waste management system" in Massachusetts.
John Fischer
Branch Chief, Waste Planning and Commercial Waste Reduction, Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection (MassDEP)
John Fischer is Branch Chief for Commercial Waste Reduction and Waste Planning at the Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection (MassDEP). In this position, he coordinates MassDEP’s programs to advance waste reduction, recycling, and composting by businesses and institutions in Massachusetts. John also oversees development and implementation of Massachusetts’ Solid Waste Master Plan, solid waste and recycling data, the Solid Waste Advisory Committee, and disaster debris planning. John has worked at MassDEP since 1998, including several years managing MassDEP’s implementation of the Toxics Use Reduction Act. Prior to joining MassDEP, John worked on solid waste and recycling policy issues as Assistant Director of Waste Policy at the Massachusetts Executive Office of Environmental Affairs. John holds a Bachelor’s degree in Human Ecology from Connecticut College and a Master’s in City Planning, focusing on Environmental Policy and Planning, from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.
Zoë Neale
Director of Business Development, Save That Stuff, Inc.
Zoë Neale has spent the bulk of her career as financial professional working as an equity mutual fund manager. Throughout her career, she was always involved in socially responsible investing and being a strong advocate for the environment. Three years ago, she became involved with Save That Stuff Organics in their efforts to develop an urban anaerobic digester and since then has remained deeply involved in all aspects of the organics market. By applying her understanding of business models to the challenges and opportunities associated with separating, hauling and processing organics, she has a unique perspective on the drivers of a successful enterprise in this emerging area.
Sabrina Pashtan
Sustainability Coordinator, Boston University Dining Services
Sabrina Pashtan is the sustainability coordinator for Boston University Dining Services. Since joining the team in 2010, she has developed a sustainability program which includes a comprehensive waste diversion and reduction program, guidelines for sustainable food procurement, and energy and water conservation initiatives. She also manages the BU Farmers Market, works with students on special events, sustainability education and marketing and community outreach and worked with the Green Restaurant Association to certify a food court, residential dining hall, bakery and restaurant as 3-star and 4-star Certified Green Restaurants®. Sabrina holds a BA in international studies from the University of Illinois-Urbana/Champaign and a culinary arts degree from La Escuela de Cocina Luis Irizar in San Sebastian, Spain.
David Pierotti
Government Affairs Specialist, Harvest Power
David Pierotti is the Government Affairs Specialist for Harvest Power. Since joining Harvest in 2010, David has been actively involved in securing over $10m in grants for various renewable energy projects. He has also participated in policy matters related to organic waste, particularly here in Massachusetts. Previously, David spent three years as a Legislative Aide in the Mass. State House focusing on constituent issues. He is currently completing a Masters degree at the Harvard Extension school for Sustainability and Environmental Management.
3:30 PM
Energy retrofits: Improving energy performance of existing building stock
For every new LEED platinum office building and net zero energy house, there are hundreds or thousands of fifteen, fifty, and hundred year old buildings that make up a vast majority of built space in cities. No sustainable future, therefore, can be achieved without dealing with this built stock of energy guzzlers. This panel features the new models for attacking this problem.
Richard J. Costello
President, Acela Energy group
Mr. Costello is the President of Acela Energy Group, an energy consulting group specializing in energy procurement, load management, as well as, energy conservation training, auditing, and on-site wind & solar generation projects. Rich has extensive experience in the fields of load management, utility services, energy conservation, as well as, power, natural gas, and tariff related negotiations and agreements.

Rich is a registered professional engineer and was previously the Power Supply Manager for the Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority, as well as, a Senior Engineer in the Load Management Department of Boston Edison. He holds a M.S. in Engineering Management from Western New England College and a B.S. in Mechanical Engineering from Northeastern University. Mr. Costello also conducts Energy Seminars nationwide for the Association of Energy Engineers. Rich was the National President of the Association for the Year 2000, and received the 2003 Energy Professional of the Year Award from the organization. In 2006, Richard was inducted into the Energy Managers Hall of Fame.
Joseph P. DeManche
Executive Vice President, Engineering and Operations, Ameresco, Inc.
Mr. DeManche has served as Ameresco’s executive vice president, engineering and operations since 2002. He has more than 30 years of experience in providing energy engineering, design, construction, operations and maintenance services for a full range of commercial, institutional, industrial and utility clients. He has overseen the design, construction, and operations for hundreds of millions of dollars in shared savings and performance contracts for large‐scale energy efficiency upgrade projects.

Mr. DeManche’s diverse experience includes preparation of energy master plans, new construction design reviews, and quality assurance reviews. He is accomplished in the strategic planning of corporate energy programs which enhance financial performance through the integration of energy productivity improvements, energy source substitutions, and energy procurement strategies. Mr. DeManche joined the company as a result of our acquisition of DukeSolutions Inc., where he most recently served as executive vice president in charge of all commercial operations. Mr. DeManche was previously the chief operating officer of Energy Investment, Inc. – a predecessor company of DukeSolutions.

Mr. DeManche earned a Master of Architecture degree from Harvard University and a B.S. from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He is also a registered Professional Engineer in many states.
Bernard Lynch
City Manager, City of Lowell
Bernard F. Lynch assumed the role of City Manager in August of 2006. As City Manager, Mr. Lynch oversees an annual operating and capital budget of $295 million that serves a community of 108,000 residents. Mr. Lynch supervises the activities of all City departments which include more than three thousand employees.

Prior to leading the City of Lowell, Mr. Lynch served as the Town Manager for the town of Chelmsford for seventeen years. As Chelmsford Town Manager, Mr. Lynch was responsible for financial management; operating and capital budget preparation and review; human resource management; procurement; direction of town departments; coordination of elected and appointed boards and committees, grant writing and long term planning.

Some of his major accomplishments in Chelmsford included establishing and implementing financial management policies, a long-term financial plan and an award winning budgeting system. Financial reserves were increased from $340,000 to $8,000,000 from 1992-2003, while property taxes were held below the limits of Proposition 2 1/2. In addition, Mr. Lynch Established the town’s first consolidated public works department, public facilities department, finance department and community development office.

Prior to his position as Chelmsford City Manager, Mr. Lynch served as Chelmsford’s Executive Secretary. His experience in municipal government is vast. He has served as an independent consultant to municipalities, as the Executive Director for the Methuen Neighborhood Development Corporation and as a Policy Analyst for the Massachusetts Housing and Finance Agency
Harvey Michaels
Director, MIT Energy Efficiency Strategy Project
Harvey Michaels teaches energy efficiency with focus on strategy innovation, and directs the MIT Energy Efficiency Strategy Project, which includes business/policy studies of utility, community, and smart grid-enabled efficiency deployment models. He is affiliated with the MIT Programs in Environmental Policy and Planning, as well as Housing, Communities, and Economic Development. Harvey also participates in the MIT Energy Initiative and the Campus Energy Task Force.

From 1997 to 2007, Harvey led Nexus Energy Software (now Aclara Software) which builds utility efficiency and customer service Web sites, as well as Meter Data Management systems. Before founding Nexus, Harvey was president of XENERGY (now part of Kema Consulting and Con Edison Solutions), which specialized in efficiency resource studies and analysis systems. Harvey serves on the Boards of Conservation Services Group and E-Meter Corporation, and was a founding member of the New England Clean Energy Council, Northeast Energy Efficiency Council (Vice President), and Association of Energy Services Professionals.
Gabe Shapiro
Vice President of Outreach Programs, Next Step Living, Inc.
Prior to NSL, Gabe spent four years as the Director of Finance of Citizen Schools, an innovative national nonprofit that provides after school programming to middle school students in low-income communities. Gabe managed all financial operations of the $13 million dollar organization including, organizational and departmental budgeting, accounting, and federal grant reporting. Gabe designed accounting and reporting procedures for and oversaw the management of mutli-million dollar federal AmeriCorps grants.
3:30 PM
Individual Action: What actually makes a difference?
In popular discussions of sustainability, personal environmental footprints are often targeted for reduction. But is this really the best venue to address our society’s resource addiction? And if it is, what types of changes can actually make the proverbial difference? In this panel, we engage experts in the environmental impacts of various activities of daily life to discuss and debate the relative impacts of changing diet, alternative working patterns, responsible product consumption, purchasing offsets, and others.
Chris Durkin
Director of Membership and Community Relations, Harvest Co-op Market
Harvest Co-op Market is a community owned cooperative food market with over 4,000 members in the Boston and Cambridge area. Started over 40 years ago in 1971, Harvest has three full service markets open to the public in Cambridge and Jamaica Plain. Harvest features organic and commercial produce, groceries, deli, cheese, and local craft breads, meat and seafood as well as beer and wine.

Chris Durkin is the Director of Membership and Community Relations at Harvest. He has been with Harvest over 20 years, serving among other jobs as a floor manager and store manager. Chris came to Harvest from Bread and Circus after they were bought out by their current owners. He serves on the Steering Committee of Cambridge Local First, is assisting the start of Jamaica Plain Local First, and is on the Board of Directors of the Central Square Business Association.
Amanda Graham
Director, MIT Energy Initiative Education Office
Amanda Graham is the director of education for the MIT Energy Initiative at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. She works closely with faculty, students and staff to guide the development and implementation of educational programs in energy and environment for undergraduate and graduate students and the MIT community. Graham coordinated the development and launch of MIT’s Energy Studies Minor for undergraduates, the Institute’s first campus-wide multidisciplinary academic program, and currently oversees its operations and governance. Graham is a member of MIT’s Campus Energy Task Force and a long-time collaborator with MIT operational staff and Cambridge planners on project-based learning opportunities engaging students in practical, local problems in energy and environment. She earned her Ph.D. in environmental communication (2001) and her M.S. in forestry social sciences (1996) from the University of Washington and her B.A. (1989) from Williams College in social and environmental policy.
Susan Hunt Stevens
Founder/CEO, Practically Green, Inc.
Susan Hunt Stevens is the Founder/CEO of Practically Green, the leading technology provider of sustainability engagement programs to global companies. She is a recognized expert in the use of social and game mechanics to drive positive behavior change. Previously, Stevens spent nine years at The New York Times Company, most recently as the senior vice president/GM of Boston.com. She received her MBA from The Amos Tuck School of Business at Dartmouth College, a BA from Wesleyan University, and a graduate certificate in sustainable design from the Boston Architectural College. Stevens currently sits on the boards of the Center for Women & Enterprise and Xconomy.com.
Sharon Wall
Regional Commissioner, FAS New England Region
Sharon Wall was selected by GSA’s Administrator in December of 2010 to lead the agency’s Telework Program Management Office following the signing by President Obama of the Telework Enhancement Act of 2010. Building upon her successful role and numerous accomplishments on behalf of GSA, she was asked by FAS Leadership to lead the Workplace Strategic initiative in collaboration with PBS to bring enterprise solutions to Federal Agencies. The primary goal is to assist agencies to transform their workplaces and their workforces building upon GSA’s successes and lessons learned. She is recognized as a subject matter expert on the subject and is sought as a guest speaker. Under Wall’s leadership, GSA was awarded GTRA’s award for Telework and Workforce transformation and the Telework Exchange’s award for Leadership in Telework.

Sharon Wall is the Regional Commissioner for New England and has served in this position since April of 2004. She is responsible for the transformation of Region 1 FAS to a high performing results oriented organization. The New England Region consistently is rated number 1 in Customer Satisfaction across all elements of nationally conducted surveys for Assisted Acquisition Service. Ms. Wall has been recognized for outstanding leadership of the Federal Acquisition Service of GSA by the Region’s Administrators.

From 2002 to 2004, Sharon was the Chief Technology Officer for Long Term Care Partners, (LTCP) LLC A joint partnership between John Hancock Financial Services, Inc and Metropolitan Life Insurance Company. She was responsible for the overall strategic technology direction for LTCP where she managed a team of IT professionals and contractors in the operational support of applications, systems, network and infrastructure required to fulfill the mission of the Federal Long Term Care Insurance Program managed by the Office of Personnel Management on behalf of both the civilian agencies and the Department of Defense. The program has more than 20 million eligible members.

From 1987 to 2002, Ms. Wall was the General Director of Global Network Services for John Hancock where she was responsible for the operation and strategic direction for John Hancock’s Information Technology infrastructure including the entire enterprise network environment. She is a past recipient of the John Hancock Corporate Award, the highest award conveyed by the company for innovation.

Sharon is a graduate of Northeastern University and attended Duke University’s, Fuqua School of Business, Executive program.

Sharon is the recipient of the StrategIT Award for Excellence in Leadership and Technological Achievement, Social Security’s Outstanding Public Service Award and the GSA Meritorious Service Award.
4:45 PM
Closing Remarks
6:00 PM
Evening Reception: Capturing the Earth in Motion -- The Art and Science of Environmental Photography
James Balog
Acclaimed Photographer and Founder, the Extreme Ice Survey
For three decades, James Balog has been a leader in photographing and interpreting the natural environment. To reveal the impact of climate change, James founded the Extreme Ice Survey (EIS), the most wide-ranging, ground-based, photographic study of glaciers ever conducted. The project is featured in the highly acclaimed 2012 documentary film, Chasing Ice.

James has been recognized with numerous awards including the Heinz Award. He has been widely published and is the author of eight books. His most recent, ICE: Portraits of Vanishing Glaciers , was released in the fall of 2012.
Sunday 28 April 2013
9:30 AM
Registration and Coffee
10:00 AM
Opening remarks & workshop pitches
10:30 AM
BioLite Stove
BioLite develops and manufactures advanced energy products that make cooking with wood as clean safe and easy as modern fuels while also providing electricity to charge cell phones and LED lights off-grid. We feel a strong sense of responsibility not just to develop products that work well but also to create businesses that make a positive contribution to the global community.
10:30 AM
Building Solutions for the New Economy in Our Neighborhoods I
New Economy @ MIT, in partnership with the New Economics Institute, is organizing a day-long workshop and hackathon to create practical tools and projects for advancing more sustainable and fair economic models in our communities.

Do you have an idea for a project that could transform how we produce, consume, or share together? Are you working to build the new economy in your neighborhood and in need of tools (apps, mapping tools, software tools, visualizations, etc...) in order to solve a problem you're facing or take your work to the next level?

Are you a programmer, developer, designer, engineer or creative maker interested in applying your know-how to the kinds of challenges facing community groups, city planners, and MIT grad students working to build more sustainable and fair economies on our campus, in our neighborhoods and cities?

Then this is for you!
10:30 AM
Sustainability: Foresight for 2030 and Beyond
The Institute for Alternative Futures (IAF) is a leader in the creation of preferred futures. This workshop will guide participants through futures methods and concepts, using our scenarios and forecasts in issues like vulnerability, food security and access, geoengineering, and others. An interactive group exercise will challenge your foresight capabilities and help you consider how your innovations, products, and organizations can contribute to and thrive within alternative futures of sustainability in 2030.
10:30 AM
The Cup Game
In this hands-on workshop, participants will role-play in a sustainability-focused simulated negotiation, The Cup Game. Participants will assume the roles of representatives of organizations negotiating to increase the sustainability of their value chain. Specifically, this value chain seeks a more productive end of life for used paper coffee cups. However, individual business within this supply chain have interests that might not be easily included in the agreement for the proposed changes.
10:30 AM
Clover Food Lab
Our food philosophy is driven by simplicity. I’d rather have you shocked by how delicious our turnip soup tastes than impress you with an exotic ingredient or fancy technique or flowery menu description. This workshop will focus on sustainable cooking and food sourcing in the Boston area.
12:30 PM
Lunch
1:30 PM
Building Solutions for the New Economy in Our Neighborhoods II
New Economy @ MIT, in partnership with the New Economics Institute, is organizing a day-long workshop and hackathon to create practical tools and projects for advancing more sustainable and fair economic models in our communities.

Do you have an idea for a project that could transform how we produce, consume, or share together? Are you working to build the new economy in your neighborhood and in need of tools (apps, mapping tools, software tools, visualizations, etc...) in order to solve a problem you're facing or take your work to the next level?

Are you a programmer, developer, designer, engineer or creative maker interested in applying your know-how to the kinds of challenges facing community groups, city planners, and MIT grad students working to build more sustainable and fair economies on our campus, in our neighborhoods and cities?

Then this is for you!
1:30 PM
Accessing Green Technologies in Rural India
Essmart bridges the gap between essential technology manufacturers and households that need their products by creating a marketplace for these products in local retail shops. We demonstrate a catalogue of products at the community level, distribute to local retail shops, and facilitate manufacturers’ warranties. We started operations in Pollachi, Tamil Nadu, India, and we invite you to join us as we deliver the goods.
1:30 PM
Authentic Sustainability Conversations
The flourishing of human and other life on earth forever. Sounds like a good idea, doesn’t it? It is a possibility that catches our attention, and inspires us amid the intense challenges of unsustainability in our economy and society. And at the same time, it makes us uneasy, like “is that really possible? How can we possibly get there?” What is the pathway? We might feel particularly skeptical if we’re in the muck as innovators and advocates, trying to convince people to “get on the bus” and facing all kinds of resistance and defense of the status quo.

We’ve got some bad news and some good news. The bad news is that the doubt, resistance and defensiveness we encounter are our own fault. As much as we might think the enemy is a "they" – the 1%, the fossil fuel companies, the politicians, the climate deniers – we can be our own worst enemy. When people think of us as “environmental whackos” it may be… because we are! We lunge forward with our passion and dedication and we tumble into pitfalls of activism – self-righteousness, ideology, blame, and despair. How’s that for flourishing? The good news is that we think there are pathways around those pitfalls. These are habits of living, speaking, relating, organizing, and innovating that massively increase our effectiveness, take us beyond preaching and whining to “the choir,” and allow us to have a lot of fun in the process. But we’ve got to figure them out together.

So this is a conversation. It is hosted by two young advocates for sustainability who are willing to poke fun at themselves, and inviting others to join in the fun. We’ll share the pitfalls and pathways we’ve identified, share our stories, and invite you to share yours. We believe the result of this conversation can be profound - a transformation of the sustainability movement, making it a context for the flourishing of our lives on the way to the flourishing of all life.
1:30 PM
Encouraging behavior change
Workshop to solve specific problems around encouraging peers to change behavior in common locations like dorms, offices, etc. Further details to be announced.
1:30 PM
Filling the gap in urban mobility
The existing suite of mobility services still presents a car-dominant face. In this workshop you will be asked to propose a new mobility service that would most decrease carbon dioxide, traffic or make moving as fun as an amusement park ride in Boston or your own city. We will then hone the ideas to consider financing issues, mental models that might get in the way of implementation and synergistic effects this set of new solutions might have if deployed together. To kick the session off you will learn about three transportation projects as well as receive a short overview of today's mobility ecosystem. These are 10^5, a prize for an open-interfaces and modular vehicle, Mobi, a start-up working to create a mesh network of modes and a new research group looking at the adaptive nature of transportation and energy infrastructure. All backgrounds are encouraged to participate.
3:30 PM
Closing presentations and remarks
Saturday 27 April 2013
8:00 AM
Registration and Breakfast

Location: WG

9:00 AM
Opening Remarks

Location: MPR

9:15 AM

Introductory Keynote

Location: MPR

READ MORE »
9:45 AM

Featured Morning Keynote

Location: MPR

READ MORE »
10:45 AM
Coffee Break

Location: WG

11:00 AM

Making Green Products the Norm

READ MORE »

Achieving triple-bottom line returns from innovative land use

READ MORE »

Investment and finance for sustainability and responsibility: Evidence from the field

READ MORE »
12:15 PM
Lunch
1:15 PM

Featured Afternoon Keynote

READ MORE »
2:00 PM

Getting products to customers in an environmentally-conscious world

READ MORE »

Innovative Partnerships for Urban Sustainability

READ MORE »

Commitment to Action: How voluntary initiatives are changing the face of international sustainability

READ MORE »
3:15 PM
Coffee Break
3:30 PM

Doing More with What We Have: Business Opportunities in Excess Capacity and Collaborative Consumption

READ MORE »

Developing an Inclusive and Sustainable Waste Management Sector in Massachusetts

READ MORE »

Energy retrofits: Improving energy performance of existing building stock

READ MORE »

Individual Action: What actually makes a difference?

READ MORE »
4:45 PM
Closing Remarks
6:00 PM

Evening Reception: Capturing the Earth in Motion -- The Art and Science of Environmental Photography

READ MORE »
Sunday 28 April 2013
9:30 AM
Registration and Coffee
10:00 AM
Opening remarks & workshop pitches
10:30 AM

BioLite Stove

READ MORE »

Building Solutions for the New Economy in Our Neighborhoods I

READ MORE »

Sustainability: Foresight for 2030 and Beyond

READ MORE »

The Cup Game

READ MORE »

Clover Food Lab

READ MORE »
12:30 PM
Lunch
1:30 PM

Building Solutions for the New Economy in Our Neighborhoods II

READ MORE »

Accessing Green Technologies in Rural India

READ MORE »

Authentic Sustainability Conversations

READ MORE »

Encouraging behavior change

READ MORE »

Filling the gap in urban mobility

READ MORE »
3:30 PM
Closing presentations and remarks


Session descriptions


Introductory Keynote

Location: MPR

John Sterman
DIRECTOR, MIT System Dynamics Group
John D. Sterman is the Jay W. Forrester Professor of Management at the MIT Sloan School of Management and Director of MIT's System Dynamics Group. His research includes systems thinking and organizational learning, computer simulation of corporate strategy and public policy issues, and environmental sustainability. He is the author of many scholarly and popular articles on the challenges and opportunities facing organizations today, including the book Modeling for Organizational Learning, and the award-winning textbook Business Dynamics. Prof. Sterman's research centers on improving decision making in complex systems, including corporate strategy and operations, energy policy, public health, environmental sustainability, and climate change. He has pioneered the development of "management flight simulators" of corporate and economic systems. These flight simulators are now used by corporations, universities and governments around the world. His research ranges from the dynamics of organizational change and the implementation of sustainable improvement programs to climate change and the implementation of policies to promote a sustainable world. Prof. Sterman has twice been awarded the Jay W. Forrester Prize for the best published work in system dynamics, won an IBM Faculty Award, won the Accenture Award for the best paper of the year published in the California Management Review, has seven times won awards for teaching excellence, and was named one of the MIT Sloan School's "Outstanding Faculty" by the Business Week Guide to the Best Business Schools. He has been featured on public television's News Hour, National Public Radio's Marketplace, CBC television, Fortune, the Financial Times, Business Week, and other media for his research and innovative use of interactive simulations in management education and policymaking.


Featured Morning Keynote

Location: MPR

This year's MIT Sustainability Summit morning keynote will delivered by Rick Ridgeway, VP of Environmental Affairs at Patagonia. Rick will discuss Patagonia's work to reduce the environmental and social impact of apparel and footwear products around the world. He will speak about the company's role as a founding member of the Sustainable Apparel Coalition as well as discuss Patagonia's Common Threads Initiative, which aims to push consumers to reduce, repair, reuse, and as a last resort, recycle goods and products. We invite you to join us to learn more about how Patagonia is taking action toward a more sustainable future.

Rick Ridgeway
VICE PRESIDENT OF ENVIRONMENTAL AFFAIRS, Patagonia
Rick Ridgeway is Patagonia’s Vice President of Environmental Affairs where he oversees vanguard environmental and sustainability initiatives including Freedom to Roam, Common Threads and the Footprint Chronicles. He also co-founded the Sustainable Apparel Coalition. In addition to business, Rick is recognized as a mountaineer and adventurer, making the first American ascent of K2. He has produced and directed several documentary films, written dozens of magazine articles and six books. National Geographic recently honored him with its "Lifetime Achievement in Adventure" award. Rick lives with his wife in Ojai, California, and they have three grown children.


Making Green Products the Norm

This panel will explore the feasibility of widespread adoption of green products within various industries (primarily targeting consumer-facing industries). We will attempt to understand who the key stakeholders are in encouraging this shift towards green products and what the different roles / levels of interaction are currently between consumers, businesses, non-profits and governments / regulatory bodies.

Jon Dettling
MANAGING DIRECTOR, United States, Quantis
Jon Dettling is the US Director for Quantis, where he provides a decade’s professional experience in leading applications of life cycle assessment, chemical management and environmental impact assessment within leading public and private sector groups. Mr. Dettling has been a member of working groups under the World Resource Institute’s Greenhouse Gas Protocol, of the Sustainability Consortium’s measurement sciences working group, on the Steering Team for the Global CEO Forum’s Project on Packaging, a reviewer for the International Journal of Life Cycle Assessment, a member of IEEE’s green engineering editorial board and member of the technical committee of the American Center for Life Cycle Assessment. He has worked with a diverse range of leaders in in public and private enterprise, including as such organizations as the World Business Council for Sustainable Development, the Environmental Defense Fund, Pfizer, Steelcase, CalRecycle, Kraft Foods, Intel and many others. He holds a Master’s degree from the University of Michigan in Environmental Health Sciences.


Michael Dupee
VICE PRESIDENT, Corporate Social Responsibility, Green Mountain Coffee Roasters
Michael leads GMCR’s sustainability efforts, including providing strategic direction and reporting publicly on its programs; managing GMCR’s portfolio of integrated sustainability initiatives and funded partner projects; and generating understanding of and recognition for GMCR’s sustainability work, internally and externally. Prior to this role, Michael was a Vice President at Goldman Sachs & Co., managing opportunistic investments in distressed financial assets. Michael holds Juris Doctor, cum laude, and Master of Business Administration degrees from Georgetown University and a B.A. in history, magna cum laude from Boston College.


Mark T. Petruzzi
SENIOR VICE PRESIDENT OF OUTREACH AND STRATEGIC RELATIONS, Green Seal
Mark leads Green Seal's engagement with purchasers, industry groups, trade associations and other external organizations that share Green Seal's goal of a more sustainable marketplace. Over the last 17 years, he has conducted research on the life cycle impacts of products and services, developed criteria to address key impacts, and evaluated products and services for compliance with Green Seal's standards in a wide range of product and service categories. Previously he directed Green Seal's Certification Program. He holds a B.S. in mechanical engineering and a M.S. in civil and environmental engineering from The George Washington University.


Rick Ridgeway
VICE PRESIDENT OF ENVIRONMENTAL AFFAIRS, Patagonia
Rick Ridgeway is Patagonia’s Vice President of Environmental Affairs where he oversees vanguard environmental and sustainability initiatives including Freedom to Roam, Common Threads and the Footprint Chronicles. He also co-founded the Sustainable Apparel Coalition. In addition to business, Rick is recognized as a mountaineer and adventurer, making the first American ascent of K2. He has produced and directed several documentary films, written dozens of magazine articles and six books. National Geographic recently honored him with its "Lifetime Achievement in Adventure" award. Rick lives with his wife in Ojai, California, and they have three grown children.


Achieving triple-bottom line returns from innovative land use

Land conservation ensures that multiple public values endure on any particular property or region. This is especially true in urban settings, where land is at a premium and the needs of the public are more immediate; livability, access to green space, public safety, and urban vitality are deeply intertwined. This panel is convened by the Trust for Public Land, a leader in land conservation and livable communities especially in urban environments. The panel will highlight how local groups are creating “triple bottom line” open spaces to meet social, economic, and environmental goals.

Margaret Dyson
DIRECTOR OF HISTORIC PARKS, Muddy River Restoration Project
Margaret Dyson is the Director of Historic Parks for the Boston Parks and Recreation Department. She oversees planning, design and construction activities in over 1,100 acres designated historic parks in the city. In addition to traditional parks projects, Ms. Dyson has worked on a variety of complex, highly regulated and multi-jurisdictional projects including landfill closures, stormwater compliance, transportation linkage, and water quality monitoring. She is currently working on the Muddy River Restoration Project, a unique effort by federal, state, and local governments to improve flood control and enhance the environment by restoring an historic urban waterway. Ms. Dyson has served as a founding member of the Massachusetts Environmental Collaborative, on the Board of Directors of Preservation Action and as a corporate trustee of The Trustees of Reservation.


William "Buzz" Constable
EXECUTIVE VICE PRESIDENT, A. W. Perry, Inc.
Buzz Constable is a founding Principal of Transit Realty Associates (TRA) as well as Executive Vice President of A.W. Perry Inc., a Boston-based real estate firm more than a century old. His focus on land and land use includes development and management of a million square feet of commercial property, and serving on numerous elected and appointed local and state boards and committees, including those associated with using Transit Oriented Development (TOD) to promote redevelopment and to finance large transportation projects. He has served as an officer and member of Boston’s Metropolitan Area Planning Council (MAPC) for twenty-five years, including more than a decade as Chairman of the MA Association of Regional Planning Agencies. Buzz is involved in local, state and federal land conservation programs, including serving as Trustee of The Trustees of Reservations (TTOR) and the Environmental League of Massachusetts (ELM). He has degrees from Williams, Yale, Boston University, and has been a Loeb Fellow at Harvard.


Kevin Essington
STATE DIRECTOR, Trust for Public Land
Kevin Essington is the state director for The Trust for Public land in Massachusetts and Rhode Island. He is responsible for the effective delivery of all land conservation services in support of The Trust for Public Land’s mission. The Massachusetts conservation program consists of nine staff members with project management, program leadership, lobbying, legal, administrative, marketing, and fundraising experience. Prior to this position Kevin worked for 10 years for The Nature Conservancy in Rhode Island and Connecticut as director of government relations and as a local conservation program director. As government relations director he was responsible for promoting sound policies and adequate funding for federal programs in Rhode Island especially for coastal and marine ecosystems. As a program director he oversaw the protection of nearly 7,000 acres in seven years in the largest block of forest between Boston and New York City. Prior to that he led the establishment of the Montezuma Land Conservancy in the Mesa Verde area of southewest Colorado and was the environmental review coordinator for the Colorado Natural Heritage Program at Colorado State University. He has a degree in history from the University of Michigan and a masters degree in environmental policy from the University of Denver. He lives in East Greenwich, Rhode Island with his family.


Glynn Llloyd
CO-FOUNDER, City Growers


Investment and finance for sustainability and responsibility: Evidence from the field

One popular way to promote sustainable behavior is by preferential investment in companies that demonstrate desirable values. Nonetheless, the total amount of money invested in funds of this character is vanishingly small compared to the total value of the markets. This panel will cast a critical eye on this venue of action, asking questions about the different available models, strategies for mainstreaming these values, and any effects that can be seen in resource use, environmental impact, labor rules, etc. due to the models. Are these effects changes that would not have happened without such investment?

Katie Grace
PROGRAM MANAGER, Initiative for Responsible Investment, Harvard Kennedy School
Katie Grace is Program Manager at the Initiative for Responsible Investment, where she oversees office management and conducts research on public policy and impact investment, sustainable cities investment, and place-based frameworks for community development. She has authored or co-authored a number of works at the IRI, including the recent "Impact at Scale: Policy Innovation for Institutional Investment with Social and Environmental Benefit." Prior to coming to the IRI at the Hauser Center, she worked as a research analyst at the Tellus Institute on projects including the identification of key sustainability performance indicators for a major oil and gas company, market definition for a nonprofit launching a single global sustainable standard for products and services, and case study analysis of the effects of university endowments on employment and the community. Katie graduated with honors from Williams College with a BA, cum laude, in Political Science and a Concentration in Leadership Studies.


Lisa Hiserodt
PROGRAM DIRECTOR, Leaders in Energy Efficiency Financing, Sustainable Endowments Institute


Rebecca Levanthal
DIRECTOR, Business Development Team, Social Finance
Rebecca Leventhal leads Social Finance’s criminal justice work on the Social Impact Bond Development team. Social Finance, a nonprofit dedicated to mobilizing investment capital to drive social change, structures innovative investment instruments that generate both a positive social impact and a financial return. The Social Impact Bond, which is core to the firm’s currents efforts, is a public private nonprofit partnership that has been recognized for its potential to provide financing solutions to some of our more persistent social problems. Prior to Social Finance, Rebecca held roles in the public and private sector, working in government, politics, finance, and the nonprofit field. Rebecca collaborated with the Mississippi State Legislature and other government and non-government actors implementing health reform in Mississippi. Previously, she served in the Office of General Counsel in the Office of Management in Budget where she responded to federal regulatory and appropriations questions and on the U.S. Department of State's Policy Planning Staff. Throughout the past three years, Rebecca has been an ambassador for President William Jefferson Clinton throughout the world and across the United States in support of his political, charitable, and personal work. In this role, she has liaised and negotiated with a host of individuals, including: high-level officials in foreign governments; international organizations; political campaigns; local and state governments; and non-governmental organizations. Before law school, she spent 15 months working for Hillary Clinton’s presidential campaign, where she cultivated relationships with local communities in over 30 states and created earned media opportunities for the candidate. Rebecca began her career at Merrill Lynch in the Municipal Finance department where she financed state and local government institutions and nonprofit facilities and later joined the Structured Finance department where she arranged secured transactions. Rebecca holds a JD from Harvard Law School and an AB in Social Studies from Harvard College.


Annie White
MANAGER, Research Products, Sustainalytics
Annie is a senior sustainability lead at Sustainalytics in Boston where she overseas operations, sustainability research projects and the internship program. Annie leads Sustainalytics’ annual publication of socially responsible companies in partnership with Maclean’s magazine along with Newsweek magazine’s annual Green Rankings. Prior to joining Sustainalytics, Annie worked on furthering sustainability initiatives with lululemon athletica and was an economic analyst with the International Food Policy Research Institute in Washington, D.C. Annie holds a BA from the University of Western Ontario and an MA in Environmental Economics from the University of Glasgow.


Featured Afternoon Keynote

This year's MIT Sustainability Summit afternoon keynote will be delivered by Katherine Gajewski, Director of the Mayor's Office of Sustainability for the City of Philadelphia. She will speak about her office's efforts to implement the ambitious and far-reaching Greenworks Philadelphia plan, which targets improvements in energy efficiency, air quality and greenhouse gas emissions, green infrastructure, and green economy jobs, among others. She will speak about successes and challenges both in achieving the goals of the plan and in developing new relationships with stakeholders both inside and outside of government necessary for the plan to be successful.

Katherine Gajewski
DIRECTOR OF SUSTAINABILITY, City of Philadelphia
Katherine Gajewski is the Director of Sustainability for the City of Philadelphia. She leads the Mayor’s Office of Sustainability and is responsible for coordinating the implementation of Greenworks Philadelphia, the City's comprehensive sustainability plan. In this role she works with city government partners and external stakeholders to advance progress across 15 targeted goals. Since the plan was launched by Mayor Nutter in 2009, Greenworks has received broad support within Philadelphia, has garnered national and international attention and has positioned Philadelphia as a leader in urban sustainability. Katherine also serves as the Director of EnergyWorks, a comprehensive energy solutions program for home and commercial building owners.


Getting products to customers in an environmentally-conscious world

Our global economy is linked together by phenomenally large and complex multi-modal logistics chains, moving raw materials, finished products, and waste around the world with astounding reliability, speed, and environmental impact. In the United States, new models of delivery are bringing the near-instant gratification of brick-and-mortar shopping to the convenience of online retail. As consumers increasingly demand sustainable products and practices, how are manufacturers and retailers (both brick & mortar and online) altering their logistics operations in response while maintaining the service levels their customers expect? What roles do transport and supply chain logistics play in a sustainable future? And what role can sustainability play in transport and supply chain logistics decisions?

Daniel Aronson
FOUNDER, SustainabilityOS
Daniel Aronson is the founder of SustainablityOS, which creates tools and resources to make sustainability activities 95% faster. Daniel has been researching, writing, and consulting on the environment, social responsibility, and innovation for over 20 years. During his consulting career, he has led sustainability strategy consulting for Deloitte and IBM and has worked with global sustainability and responsibility leaders in apparel, health care, telecommunications, high technology, and many other industries.

Daniel has been a guest lecturer at Harvard Business School's class on strategic corporate citizenship and MIT’s Sustainability Lab, and has also authored and been interviewed for numerous publications (examples include how sustainability drives innovation, the sustainable value chain practices that lead to success, and ‘hard wiring’ sustainability into organizations).

He has also:
 Conducted the first research that examined which sustainable value chain practices actually work, made it possible for cities to set science-based carbon targets in hours instead of months
 Created much more sophisticated frameworks for types of sustainability-related customer-product fit (two dozen) and risk (1,000 distinct ones)
 Quantified (for the first time) the effect of sustainability leadership on innovation
 Cataloged dozens of different sustainability techniques (and their pros and cons), from common (e.g., substitution) to rare (e.g., transport-to-trade).

He serves on two board committees of the Corporate Responsibility Officers Association and as a member of the Social Responsibility Advisory Board of the American Society for Quality, the US home for ISO 26000.

Daniel holds an MBA from the MIT Sloan School of Management, and a BA with High Honors from UC Berkeley. He lives in the New York City area.

Representative clients: Nike, Johnson & Johnson (ranked #3 by CR Magazine), Autodesk (named #1 by Climate Counts), Interface (#3 globally according to GlobeScan) and Philips (#1 in the DJSI’s ranking of Industrial Conglomerates).


Edgar Blanco
RESEARCH DIRECTOR, MIT Center for Transportation & Logistics
Dr. Edgar Blanco is a Research Director at the MIT Center for Transportation & Logistics and is the Executive Director of the MIT SCALE Network in Latin America. His current research focus is the design of environmentally efficient supply chains. He also leads research initiatives on supply chain innovations in emerging markets, logistics operations in megacities and disruptive mobile technologies in value chains.

Dr. Blanco has over thirteen years of experience in designing and improving logistics and supply chain systems, including the application of operations research techniques, statistical methods, GIS technologies and software solutions to deliver significant savings in business operations.

Prior to joining MIT, he was leading the Inventory Optimization practice at Retek (now Oracle Retail). He received his Ph.D. from the School of Industrial and Systems Engineering at the Georgia Institute of Technology. His educational background includes a B.S. and M.S. in Industrial Engineering from Universidad de los Andes (Bogotá, Colombia) and a M.S. in Operations Research from the Georgia Institute of Technology.


Mark Buckley
VICE PRESIDENT, Environmental Affairs, Staples, Inc.
Mark Buckley is vice president of environmental affairs for Staples, Inc. He directs Staples environmental commitment and sustainable business practices to protect and preserve natural resources. He is responsible for driving the company’s environmental leadership in four major areas: the purchase and promotion of recycled content products; chain-wide recycling initiatives; energy conservation programs and renewable power procurement; and educational initiatives for customers and associates. As a key part of his role, Mark oversees a strategic business plan that supports goals outlined by Staples environmental paper procurement policy. The policy formalizes the company’s commitment to protecting forest resources through environmentally sound paper procurement practices. In doing so, Mark serves as an important liaison with suppliers, environmental groups, paper industry groups and consultants.

A 22-year Staples veteran, Mark was previously vice president of facilities management and purchasing at Staples. His responsibilities included directing company-wide recycling and energy conservation programs, starting in 1993. He has also served as a key member of Staples Environmental Action Group. Prior to joining Staples, Mark held several leadership positions in the field of environmental management for Star Market, Continental Baking, General Environmental Services Inc. and the U.S. Department of Interior/Aquaculture Project. He holds a bachelor’s degree in biology from St. Anselm’s College and is an active member of several environmental groups for the state of Massachusetts.


Jim Bruce
VICE PRESIDENT, UPS Corporate Public Affairs
Jim Bruce has served UPS in Washington, D.C. for four years as Special Counsel, and now Vice President, working on issues related to energy policy, alternative fuel vehicles, and sustainability. Jim is on the UPS Working Committee on Sustainability. Prior to joining UPS, Jim was a partner at Wiley, Rein, LLP in the Government Policy Group in Washington, D.C., assisting corporate clients on energy legislation and federal procurement law. Before that, he was the Senior Counsel to the U.S. Senate Committee on Energy and Natural Resources with 13 years service. He graduated from Princeton University with a B.S.E. (with Honors) and M.S.E. in aerospace mechanical engineering (Master’s thesis in automatic feedback control systems). He received his J.D. from George Washington University Law School. He is a member of the District of Columbia Bar and is a registered patent attorney. He was honorably discharged as a captain in the U.S. Army Transportation Corps.


Innovative Partnerships for Urban Sustainability

As is commonly cited, the world has reached an urbanization tipping point. While cities take up approximately 2% of landmass worldwide they represent over half of global population, two-thirds of the world's energy usage, and over 70% of the world's carbon emissions. Due to these impacts and the on-the-ground experience of climate change, city leaders are leading the world to a more sustainable future. While national governments have been slow to navigate the difficulties of climate change politics, urban innovators form the public, academic, and private sectors are making material progress. In addition to bold new ideas, however, sustainable change at the urban scale requires innovative partnerships between agencies and actors. During this session, attendees will hear from both thinkers and doers at a variety of scales who have developed creative solutions to pressing sustainability challenges while utilizing innovative partnerships to achieve their success.

Katherine Gajewski
DIRECTOR OF SUSTAINABILITY, City of Philadelphia
Katherine Gajewski is the Director of Sustainability for the City of Philadelphia. She leads the Mayor’s Office of Sustainability and is responsible for coordinating the implementation of Greenworks Philadelphia, the City's comprehensive sustainability plan. In this role she works with city government partners and external stakeholders to advance progress across 15 targeted goals. Since the plan was launched by Mayor Nutter in 2009, Greenworks has received broad support within Philadelphia, has garnered national and international attention and has positioned Philadelphia as a leader in urban sustainability. Katherine also serves as the Director of EnergyWorks, a comprehensive energy solutions program for home and commercial building owners.


Caroline Howe
DIRECTOR, Civic Consumption Program, Groundswell
Caroline Howe is the Director of Groundswell's Civic Consumption program, uniting organizations that drive higher environmental and social performance throughout the supply chain through aggregation of community demand. Groundswell has been demonstrating this model through their work leveraging the shared purchasing power of community groups to transform markets for electricity and energy efficiency from the bottom up. Caroline works with Groundswell to build the field of civic consumption, by convening other practitioners, collecting best practices, and identifying new ways to share the tools of civic consumption in new fields. She is also a Legatum Fellow in Entrepreneurship and Development at MIT, focused on solutions for waste management that leverage the power of communities, social entrepreneurs, and new recycling technologies.


Nigel Jacob
CO-CHAIR, Mayor's Office of New Urban Mechanics
With an extensive background in collaborative, citizen-facing technology projects, Nigel Jacob co-founded the Office of New Urban Mechanics -- a civic innovation incubator within Boston's City Hall. Nigel also serves as Mayor Menino's advisor on emerging technologies. In both of these roles, Nigel works to develop new models of innovation for cities in the 21st century. Prior to joining the City of Boston in 2006, Nigel worked for and launched a series of technology start-ups in the Boston area. Nigel is also a fellow at the Center for the Advancement Public Action at Bennington College. Nigel has received a number of awards for his ground breaking work in Boston, including being named a Public Official of the year in 2011 by Governing Magazine and the Tribeca Disruptive Innovation award for 2012.


Christoph Reinhart
ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR IN BUILDING TECHNOLOGY, MIT
Christoph Reinhart is an Associate Professor in Building Technology at MIT where heads the Sustainable Design Lab. He works in the field of sustainable building design and environmental modeling and has particular expertise is in daylighting, passive climatization techniques and the influence of occupant behavior on building energy use. Before joining MIT in early 2012 he led the Sustainable Design Program at Harvard and was a staff scientist at the National Research Council of Canada. He holds a doctorate in architecture form the Technical University of Karlsruhe.


Commitment to Action: How voluntary initiatives are changing the face of international sustainability

In the face of weakening international resolve for traditional top-down approaches to great global sustainability challenges such as climate change, bottom-up voluntary commitments may represent an increasingly important mode for stimulating action. The UN Conference on Sustainable Development (Rio+20) held in June 2012, for example, generated by some counts over $600 billion in new commitments toward sustainability, from governments, private sector, civil society and development banks. Other venues such as the Major Economies Forum have promise to stimulate real action on climate change by the world’s largest emitters. Panelists will discuss some of the major voluntary commitment models, outcomes of Rio+20, as well as mechanisms to track and generate more progress from all actors.

David Berry
PARTNER, Flagship Ventures, Inc.
David Berry joined Flagship in 2005 where he focuses on innovating, entrepreneuring, and investing in new ventures in life sciences and sustainability. He is a founder of Flagship portfolio companies LS9, Joule Unlimited, Eleven Biotherapeutics, Seres Health, Pronutria, among others. David was founding CEO of Joule and Pronutria. He was also a Board member of Flagship portfolio company CGI Pharmaceuticals (acquired by Gilead in 2010), and currently serves on the boards of Joule, Eleven, Seres and Pronutria. David previously completed his combined MD-PhD from Harvard Medical School and the MIT Biological Engineering Division in just over 5 years.

He has been recognized with over 50 awards and honors as an innovator including receiving the prestigious Lemelson-MIT Student Prize for invention and innovation, being named the Innovator of the Year by Technology Review, and being selected by the US State Department as 1 of 12 Innovators Helping to Reshape Realty. He also speaks across the globe on topics including innovation, sustainability, biotechnology, and entrepreneurship, including at the National Academies, for the Prince of Girona Foundation, and at Google Solve for X. David previously served on the MIT Corporation, its Board of Trustees, and currently serves on the boards of multiple not-for-profits in education and the arts, and has been appointed to the United Nations Sustainable Development Solution Network Leadership Council.


Jacob Scherr
DIRECTOR, Global Strategy and Advocacy, Natural Resources Defense Council
S. Jacob Scherr is the director of global strategy and advocacy for NRDC in its Washington, D.C. office. Mr. Scherr has responsibility for overseeing international activities throughout the organization, including preparations for the Rio+20 “Earth Summit. During his career with NRDC since 1976, Mr. Scherr has served as director of the organization's international program, director of its BioGems initiative, and a senior attorney. He has worked extensively on a broad range of international environmental and nuclear issues. Mr. Scherr is a member of the boards of the Center for Global Development and the Herbert Scoville, Jr. Peace Fellowship. Mr. Scherr is a 1970 graduate of Wesleyan University in Middletown, Connecticut. In 1974, he received his J.D. with highest honors from the University of Maryland Law School in 1974.


Henrik Selin
ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR, Department of International Relations, Boston University
Henrik Selin conducts research and teaches classes on global and regional politics and policy making on environment and sustainable development. His book Global Governance of Hazardous Chemicals: Challenges of Multilevel Management was recently published by MIT Press. Selin is the faculty coordinator for the IR & Environmental Policy program. He is also a Core Faculty member of the Center for Energy & Environmental Studies, Boston University, and an Affiliated Researcher with the Center for Climate Science and Policy Research, Linköping University. Prior to his current faculty position, Selin was a Wallenberg Research Fellow in Environment and Sustainability in the Environmental Policy and Planning Group, Department of Urban Studies and Planning, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (2001–04), an Associate with the Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, John F. Kennedy School of Government, Harvard University (2001–03), and an Associate with the Center for International Development, John F. Kennedy School of Government, Harvard University (2003–04).


Doing More with What We Have: Business Opportunities in Excess Capacity and Collaborative Consumption

With the success of businesses such as Netflix and Zipcar the business model for collaborative consumption – organized systems of lending, sharing, bartering, and swapping instead of direct purchase - has been proven successful, but what other opportunities for application may be out there? This panel discusses the collaborative consumption movement, and features speakers utilizing this model to drive value to their customers while simultaneously maximizing the utility of both durable and less-tangible goods. Additionally, this panel presents a special focus on the challenges of establishing a new business within the collaborative consumption area, including experiences from our panelists, and the techniques they used to overcome those challenges.

Luka Carfagna
SOCIOLOGY DEPARTMENT, Boston College
Lindsey "Luka" Carfagna is a doctoral student in the Sociology Department at Boston College, holds an M.A. in the Social Sciences from the University of Chicago, and double majored in Economics and Sociology at the University of Vermont, where she competed on the soccer and track teams. She works as a research assistant for Juliet Schor as part of the MacArthur Foundation’s Connected Learning Research Network and is currently studying open learning. She also helps Juliet Schor organize Summer Institutes in New Economics for PhD students looking to enter the emerging field. Luka’s research interests are in economic sociology and the sociology of education with specific focuses on cultural capital in digital spaces as well as how institutional and organizational mechanisms facilitate the reproduction of inequality. On the side, she contracts as a researcher for a few small consulting groups and is proficient in qualitative and quantitative research design, implementation, analysis, and reporting.


Ryan C. C. Chin
MANAGING DIRECTOR AND RESEARCH SCIENTIST, MIT City Science Initiative
Dr. Ryan C.C. Chin is the managing director of the City Science Initiative at the MIT Media Lab. His research focuses on developing new urban systems for a post-oil, connected world. He earned his Ph.D. at the MIT Media Lab in 2012 by creating Mobility-on-Demand (MoD) Systems – a network of one-way shared-use lightweight electric vehicles (LEVs) enabled by electric charging infrastructure and smart fleet management systems. Under Dr. Chin’s leadership, the Smart Cities research group, developed a series of LEVs for MoD systems in collaboration with industry including the CityCar (with GM), RoboScooter (with SYM), and the GreenWheel Electric Bicycle.

Dr. Chin’s research led to the group’s first major publication, Reinventing the Automobile: Personal Urban Mobility for the 21st Century written by William J. Mitchell (his advisor), Chris Borroni-Bird (GM), and Lawrence Burns (GM) published by MIT Press in January of 2010. Dr. Chin also has led MIT’s collaboration with Hiriko, a new electric car manufacturer based in Spain, to develop a commercial version of the CityCar – A foldable, sharable, modular, electric two-passenger vehicle that utilizes four modular in-wheel electric motors with integrated steering and suspension (called Robot Wheels) – due for market release in the summer of 2013. Dr. Chin’s Ph.D. thesis entitled “Smart Customization: Making Evidence-Based Environmental Decisions” focused on the ability to improve the sustainability of products by utilizing Mass Customization strategies. Chin has been a keynote speaker and panelist at conferences like MIT’s Emerging Technologies Conference (EmTech), TEDx, SIGGRAPH, Convergence, China Planning Network (CPN), MIT World, and Gridweek. Dr. Chin at MIT earned a Master of Science in Media Arts and Sciences (2004), and a Master of Architecture (2000), and Bachelor’s degrees in Civil Engineering (1997) and Architecture (1997) from the Catholic University of America.


Mark Chase
PARKING AND TRANSPORTATION DEMAND CONSULTANT, Livable Streets Alliance
Mark has over fifteen years of Transportation planning experience in the public, private and non-profit sectors. His employment and consulting background includes work in transportation demand management initiatives including car-sharing programs, bicycle facilities planning, shuttle systems operations and parking management. Mark is a social entrepreneur who has been involved with the launch of several for-profit and non-profit enterprises. He was part of the senior management team that launched the innovative car-sharing program Zipcar and social networking car-pool site GoLoco. He co-founded Central Bike Services, a bicycle facility installation and maintenance company based in Boston. Mark is actively involved with car-parking reform as key component of sustainable transportation systems. Currently Mark undertakes contract consulting work for Nelson Nygaard Consulting Associates in New York City. He is an adviser and technical expert for the Livable Streets Alliance.


Antje Danielson
CO-FOUNDER, Zipcar, Inc.
Antje Danielson is the Co-Founder of Zipcar where she shaped the vision, technology, operational procedures, and early business relations of the company. Zipcar is the world's leading car-sharing service with members throughout North American and Europe. As a leader in urban transportation, Zipcar offers vehicles to savvy city residents and businesses looking for an alternative to the hassles of owning a car.

Antje currently works at Tufts University where she directs the Institute of the Environment. Her area of expertise is climate change mitigation and environmental behavioral change. She serves on a number of advisory boards of companies and non-profit organizations. She has led interdisciplinary teams working on environmental issues since 1998 as a researcher, entrepreneur, and implementation practitioner.

Dr. Danielson was born and raised in Berlin Germany, where she received her Ph.D. in Geochemistry from the Freie Universität Berlin. She has worked and studied in many countries including South Africa, Italy, the UK, Canada, and the US. She enjoys gardening, sailing, and spending time with her children.


Developing an Inclusive and Sustainable Waste Management Sector in Massachusetts

Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection (MassDEP) is in the process of implementing a ban on commercial and institutional entities sending food waste to landfills. There are several benefit on the landfills and farming industry by the implementation of this ban, but there are needs to be able to make this program work properly. The objective of this panel is to focus on the facts and challenges of implementing this waste ban as well as the steps being taken to create a "closed loop food waste management system" in Massachusetts.

John Fischer
BRANCH CHIEF, Waste Planning and Commercial Waste Reduction, Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection (MassDEP)
John Fischer is Branch Chief for Commercial Waste Reduction and Waste Planning at the Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection (MassDEP). In this position, he coordinates MassDEP’s programs to advance waste reduction, recycling, and composting by businesses and institutions in Massachusetts. John also oversees development and implementation of Massachusetts’ Solid Waste Master Plan, solid waste and recycling data, the Solid Waste Advisory Committee, and disaster debris planning. John has worked at MassDEP since 1998, including several years managing MassDEP’s implementation of the Toxics Use Reduction Act. Prior to joining MassDEP, John worked on solid waste and recycling policy issues as Assistant Director of Waste Policy at the Massachusetts Executive Office of Environmental Affairs. John holds a Bachelor’s degree in Human Ecology from Connecticut College and a Master’s in City Planning, focusing on Environmental Policy and Planning, from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.


Zoë Neale
DIRECTOR OF BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT, Save That Stuff, Inc.
Zoë Neale has spent the bulk of her career as financial professional working as an equity mutual fund manager. Throughout her career, she was always involved in socially responsible investing and being a strong advocate for the environment. Three years ago, she became involved with Save That Stuff Organics in their efforts to develop an urban anaerobic digester and since then has remained deeply involved in all aspects of the organics market. By applying her understanding of business models to the challenges and opportunities associated with separating, hauling and processing organics, she has a unique perspective on the drivers of a successful enterprise in this emerging area.


Sabrina Pashtan
SUSTAINABILITY COORDINATOR, Boston University Dining Services
Sabrina Pashtan is the sustainability coordinator for Boston University Dining Services. Since joining the team in 2010, she has developed a sustainability program which includes a comprehensive waste diversion and reduction program, guidelines for sustainable food procurement, and energy and water conservation initiatives. She also manages the BU Farmers Market, works with students on special events, sustainability education and marketing and community outreach and worked with the Green Restaurant Association to certify a food court, residential dining hall, bakery and restaurant as 3-star and 4-star Certified Green Restaurants®. Sabrina holds a BA in international studies from the University of Illinois-Urbana/Champaign and a culinary arts degree from La Escuela de Cocina Luis Irizar in San Sebastian, Spain.


David Pierotti
GOVERNMENT AFFAIRS SPECIALIST, Harvest Power
David Pierotti is the Government Affairs Specialist for Harvest Power. Since joining Harvest in 2010, David has been actively involved in securing over $10m in grants for various renewable energy projects. He has also participated in policy matters related to organic waste, particularly here in Massachusetts. Previously, David spent three years as a Legislative Aide in the Mass. State House focusing on constituent issues. He is currently completing a Masters degree at the Harvard Extension school for Sustainability and Environmental Management.


Energy retrofits: Improving energy performance of existing building stock

For every new LEED platinum office building and net zero energy house, there are hundreds or thousands of fifteen, fifty, and hundred year old buildings that make up a vast majority of built space in cities. No sustainable future, therefore, can be achieved without dealing with this built stock of energy guzzlers. This panel features the new models for attacking this problem.

Richard J. Costello
PRESIDENT, Acela Energy group
Mr. Costello is the President of Acela Energy Group, an energy consulting group specializing in energy procurement, load management, as well as, energy conservation training, auditing, and on-site wind & solar generation projects. Rich has extensive experience in the fields of load management, utility services, energy conservation, as well as, power, natural gas, and tariff related negotiations and agreements.

Rich is a registered professional engineer and was previously the Power Supply Manager for the Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority, as well as, a Senior Engineer in the Load Management Department of Boston Edison. He holds a M.S. in Engineering Management from Western New England College and a B.S. in Mechanical Engineering from Northeastern University. Mr. Costello also conducts Energy Seminars nationwide for the Association of Energy Engineers. Rich was the National President of the Association for the Year 2000, and received the 2003 Energy Professional of the Year Award from the organization. In 2006, Richard was inducted into the Energy Managers Hall of Fame.


Joseph P. DeManche
EXECUTIVE VICE PRESIDENT, Engineering and Operations, Ameresco, Inc.
Mr. DeManche has served as Ameresco’s executive vice president, engineering and operations since 2002. He has more than 30 years of experience in providing energy engineering, design, construction, operations and maintenance services for a full range of commercial, institutional, industrial and utility clients. He has overseen the design, construction, and operations for hundreds of millions of dollars in shared savings and performance contracts for large‐scale energy efficiency upgrade projects.

Mr. DeManche’s diverse experience includes preparation of energy master plans, new construction design reviews, and quality assurance reviews. He is accomplished in the strategic planning of corporate energy programs which enhance financial performance through the integration of energy productivity improvements, energy source substitutions, and energy procurement strategies. Mr. DeManche joined the company as a result of our acquisition of DukeSolutions Inc., where he most recently served as executive vice president in charge of all commercial operations. Mr. DeManche was previously the chief operating officer of Energy Investment, Inc. – a predecessor company of DukeSolutions.

Mr. DeManche earned a Master of Architecture degree from Harvard University and a B.S. from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He is also a registered Professional Engineer in many states.


Bernard Lynch
CITY MANAGER, City of Lowell
Bernard F. Lynch assumed the role of City Manager in August of 2006. As City Manager, Mr. Lynch oversees an annual operating and capital budget of $295 million that serves a community of 108,000 residents. Mr. Lynch supervises the activities of all City departments which include more than three thousand employees.

Prior to leading the City of Lowell, Mr. Lynch served as the Town Manager for the town of Chelmsford for seventeen years. As Chelmsford Town Manager, Mr. Lynch was responsible for financial management; operating and capital budget preparation and review; human resource management; procurement; direction of town departments; coordination of elected and appointed boards and committees, grant writing and long term planning.

Some of his major accomplishments in Chelmsford included establishing and implementing financial management policies, a long-term financial plan and an award winning budgeting system. Financial reserves were increased from $340,000 to $8,000,000 from 1992-2003, while property taxes were held below the limits of Proposition 2 1/2. In addition, Mr. Lynch Established the town’s first consolidated public works department, public facilities department, finance department and community development office.

Prior to his position as Chelmsford City Manager, Mr. Lynch served as Chelmsford’s Executive Secretary. His experience in municipal government is vast. He has served as an independent consultant to municipalities, as the Executive Director for the Methuen Neighborhood Development Corporation and as a Policy Analyst for the Massachusetts Housing and Finance Agency


Harvey Michaels
DIRECTOR, MIT Energy Efficiency Strategy Project
Harvey Michaels teaches energy efficiency with focus on strategy innovation, and directs the MIT Energy Efficiency Strategy Project, which includes business/policy studies of utility, community, and smart grid-enabled efficiency deployment models. He is affiliated with the MIT Programs in Environmental Policy and Planning, as well as Housing, Communities, and Economic Development. Harvey also participates in the MIT Energy Initiative and the Campus Energy Task Force.

From 1997 to 2007, Harvey led Nexus Energy Software (now Aclara Software) which builds utility efficiency and customer service Web sites, as well as Meter Data Management systems. Before founding Nexus, Harvey was president of XENERGY (now part of Kema Consulting and Con Edison Solutions), which specialized in efficiency resource studies and analysis systems. Harvey serves on the Boards of Conservation Services Group and E-Meter Corporation, and was a founding member of the New England Clean Energy Council, Northeast Energy Efficiency Council (Vice President), and Association of Energy Services Professionals.


Gabe Shapiro
VICE PRESIDENT OF OUTREACH PROGRAMS, Next Step Living, Inc.
Prior to NSL, Gabe spent four years as the Director of Finance of Citizen Schools, an innovative national nonprofit that provides after school programming to middle school students in low-income communities. Gabe managed all financial operations of the $13 million dollar organization including, organizational and departmental budgeting, accounting, and federal grant reporting. Gabe designed accounting and reporting procedures for and oversaw the management of mutli-million dollar federal AmeriCorps grants.


Individual Action: What actually makes a difference?

In popular discussions of sustainability, personal environmental footprints are often targeted for reduction. But is this really the best venue to address our society’s resource addiction? And if it is, what types of changes can actually make the proverbial difference? In this panel, we engage experts in the environmental impacts of various activities of daily life to discuss and debate the relative impacts of changing diet, alternative working patterns, responsible product consumption, purchasing offsets, and others.

Chris Durkin
DIRECTOR OF MEMBERSHIP AND COMMUNITY RELATIONS, Harvest Co-op Market
Harvest Co-op Market is a community owned cooperative food market with over 4,000 members in the Boston and Cambridge area. Started over 40 years ago in 1971, Harvest has three full service markets open to the public in Cambridge and Jamaica Plain. Harvest features organic and commercial produce, groceries, deli, cheese, and local craft breads, meat and seafood as well as beer and wine.

Chris Durkin is the Director of Membership and Community Relations at Harvest. He has been with Harvest over 20 years, serving among other jobs as a floor manager and store manager. Chris came to Harvest from Bread and Circus after they were bought out by their current owners. He serves on the Steering Committee of Cambridge Local First, is assisting the start of Jamaica Plain Local First, and is on the Board of Directors of the Central Square Business Association.


Amanda Graham
DIRECTOR, MIT Energy Initiative Education Office
Amanda Graham is the director of education for the MIT Energy Initiative at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. She works closely with faculty, students and staff to guide the development and implementation of educational programs in energy and environment for undergraduate and graduate students and the MIT community. Graham coordinated the development and launch of MIT’s Energy Studies Minor for undergraduates, the Institute’s first campus-wide multidisciplinary academic program, and currently oversees its operations and governance. Graham is a member of MIT’s Campus Energy Task Force and a long-time collaborator with MIT operational staff and Cambridge planners on project-based learning opportunities engaging students in practical, local problems in energy and environment. She earned her Ph.D. in environmental communication (2001) and her M.S. in forestry social sciences (1996) from the University of Washington and her B.A. (1989) from Williams College in social and environmental policy.


Susan Hunt Stevens
FOUNDER/CEO, Practically Green, Inc.
Susan Hunt Stevens is the Founder/CEO of Practically Green, the leading technology provider of sustainability engagement programs to global companies. She is a recognized expert in the use of social and game mechanics to drive positive behavior change. Previously, Stevens spent nine years at The New York Times Company, most recently as the senior vice president/GM of Boston.com. She received her MBA from The Amos Tuck School of Business at Dartmouth College, a BA from Wesleyan University, and a graduate certificate in sustainable design from the Boston Architectural College. Stevens currently sits on the boards of the Center for Women & Enterprise and Xconomy.com.


Sharon Wall
REGIONAL COMMISSIONER, FAS New England Region
Sharon Wall was selected by GSA’s Administrator in December of 2010 to lead the agency’s Telework Program Management Office following the signing by President Obama of the Telework Enhancement Act of 2010. Building upon her successful role and numerous accomplishments on behalf of GSA, she was asked by FAS Leadership to lead the Workplace Strategic initiative in collaboration with PBS to bring enterprise solutions to Federal Agencies. The primary goal is to assist agencies to transform their workplaces and their workforces building upon GSA’s successes and lessons learned. She is recognized as a subject matter expert on the subject and is sought as a guest speaker. Under Wall’s leadership, GSA was awarded GTRA’s award for Telework and Workforce transformation and the Telework Exchange’s award for Leadership in Telework.

Sharon Wall is the Regional Commissioner for New England and has served in this position since April of 2004. She is responsible for the transformation of Region 1 FAS to a high performing results oriented organization. The New England Region consistently is rated number 1 in Customer Satisfaction across all elements of nationally conducted surveys for Assisted Acquisition Service. Ms. Wall has been recognized for outstanding leadership of the Federal Acquisition Service of GSA by the Region’s Administrators.

From 2002 to 2004, Sharon was the Chief Technology Officer for Long Term Care Partners, (LTCP) LLC A joint partnership between John Hancock Financial Services, Inc and Metropolitan Life Insurance Company. She was responsible for the overall strategic technology direction for LTCP where she managed a team of IT professionals and contractors in the operational support of applications, systems, network and infrastructure required to fulfill the mission of the Federal Long Term Care Insurance Program managed by the Office of Personnel Management on behalf of both the civilian agencies and the Department of Defense. The program has more than 20 million eligible members.

From 1987 to 2002, Ms. Wall was the General Director of Global Network Services for John Hancock where she was responsible for the operation and strategic direction for John Hancock’s Information Technology infrastructure including the entire enterprise network environment. She is a past recipient of the John Hancock Corporate Award, the highest award conveyed by the company for innovation.

Sharon is a graduate of Northeastern University and attended Duke University’s, Fuqua School of Business, Executive program.

Sharon is the recipient of the StrategIT Award for Excellence in Leadership and Technological Achievement, Social Security’s Outstanding Public Service Award and the GSA Meritorious Service Award.


Evening Reception: Capturing the Earth in Motion -- The Art and Science of Environmental Photography

James Balog
ACCLAIMED PHOTOGRAPHER AND FOUNDER, the Extreme Ice Survey
For three decades, James Balog has been a leader in photographing and interpreting the natural environment. To reveal the impact of climate change, James founded the Extreme Ice Survey (EIS), the most wide-ranging, ground-based, photographic study of glaciers ever conducted. The project is featured in the highly acclaimed 2012 documentary film, Chasing Ice.

James has been recognized with numerous awards including the Heinz Award. He has been widely published and is the author of eight books. His most recent, ICE: Portraits of Vanishing Glaciers , was released in the fall of 2012.


BioLite Stove

BioLite develops and manufactures advanced energy products that make cooking with wood as clean safe and easy as modern fuels while also providing electricity to charge cell phones and LED lights off-grid. We feel a strong sense of responsibility not just to develop products that work well but also to create businesses that make a positive contribution to the global community.

Building Solutions for the New Economy in Our Neighborhoods I

New Economy @ MIT, in partnership with the New Economics Institute, is organizing a day-long workshop and hackathon to create practical tools and projects for advancing more sustainable and fair economic models in our communities.

Do you have an idea for a project that could transform how we produce, consume, or share together? Are you working to build the new economy in your neighborhood and in need of tools (apps, mapping tools, software tools, visualizations, etc...) in order to solve a problem you're facing or take your work to the next level?

Are you a programmer, developer, designer, engineer or creative maker interested in applying your know-how to the kinds of challenges facing community groups, city planners, and MIT grad students working to build more sustainable and fair economies on our campus, in our neighborhoods and cities?

Then this is for you!

Sustainability: Foresight for 2030 and Beyond

The Institute for Alternative Futures (IAF) is a leader in the creation of preferred futures. This workshop will guide participants through futures methods and concepts, using our scenarios and forecasts in issues like vulnerability, food security and access, geoengineering, and others. An interactive group exercise will challenge your foresight capabilities and help you consider how your innovations, products, and organizations can contribute to and thrive within alternative futures of sustainability in 2030.

The Cup Game

In this hands-on workshop, participants will role-play in a sustainability-focused simulated negotiation, The Cup Game. Participants will assume the roles of representatives of organizations negotiating to increase the sustainability of their value chain. Specifically, this value chain seeks a more productive end of life for used paper coffee cups. However, individual business within this supply chain have interests that might not be easily included in the agreement for the proposed changes.

Clover Food Lab

Our food philosophy is driven by simplicity. I’d rather have you shocked by how delicious our turnip soup tastes than impress you with an exotic ingredient or fancy technique or flowery menu description. This workshop will focus on sustainable cooking and food sourcing in the Boston area.

Building Solutions for the New Economy in Our Neighborhoods II

New Economy @ MIT, in partnership with the New Economics Institute, is organizing a day-long workshop and hackathon to create practical tools and projects for advancing more sustainable and fair economic models in our communities.

Do you have an idea for a project that could transform how we produce, consume, or share together? Are you working to build the new economy in your neighborhood and in need of tools (apps, mapping tools, software tools, visualizations, etc...) in order to solve a problem you're facing or take your work to the next level?

Are you a programmer, developer, designer, engineer or creative maker interested in applying your know-how to the kinds of challenges facing community groups, city planners, and MIT grad students working to build more sustainable and fair economies on our campus, in our neighborhoods and cities?

Then this is for you!

Accessing Green Technologies in Rural India

Essmart bridges the gap between essential technology manufacturers and households that need their products by creating a marketplace for these products in local retail shops. We demonstrate a catalogue of products at the community level, distribute to local retail shops, and facilitate manufacturers’ warranties. We started operations in Pollachi, Tamil Nadu, India, and we invite you to join us as we deliver the goods.

Authentic Sustainability Conversations

The flourishing of human and other life on earth forever. Sounds like a good idea, doesn’t it? It is a possibility that catches our attention, and inspires us amid the intense challenges of unsustainability in our economy and society. And at the same time, it makes us uneasy, like “is that really possible? How can we possibly get there?” What is the pathway? We might feel particularly skeptical if we’re in the muck as innovators and advocates, trying to convince people to “get on the bus” and facing all kinds of resistance and defense of the status quo.

We’ve got some bad news and some good news. The bad news is that the doubt, resistance and defensiveness we encounter are our own fault. As much as we might think the enemy is a "they" – the 1%, the fossil fuel companies, the politicians, the climate deniers – we can be our own worst enemy. When people think of us as “environmental whackos” it may be… because we are! We lunge forward with our passion and dedication and we tumble into pitfalls of activism – self-righteousness, ideology, blame, and despair. How’s that for flourishing? The good news is that we think there are pathways around those pitfalls. These are habits of living, speaking, relating, organizing, and innovating that massively increase our effectiveness, take us beyond preaching and whining to “the choir,” and allow us to have a lot of fun in the process. But we’ve got to figure them out together.

So this is a conversation. It is hosted by two young advocates for sustainability who are willing to poke fun at themselves, and inviting others to join in the fun. We’ll share the pitfalls and pathways we’ve identified, share our stories, and invite you to share yours. We believe the result of this conversation can be profound - a transformation of the sustainability movement, making it a context for the flourishing of our lives on the way to the flourishing of all life.

Encouraging behavior change

Workshop to solve specific problems around encouraging peers to change behavior in common locations like dorms, offices, etc. Further details to be announced.

Filling the gap in urban mobility

The existing suite of mobility services still presents a car-dominant face. In this workshop you will be asked to propose a new mobility service that would most decrease carbon dioxide, traffic or make moving as fun as an amusement park ride in Boston or your own city. We will then hone the ideas to consider financing issues, mental models that might get in the way of implementation and synergistic effects this set of new solutions might have if deployed together. To kick the session off you will learn about three transportation projects as well as receive a short overview of today's mobility ecosystem. These are 10^5, a prize for an open-interfaces and modular vehicle, Mobi, a start-up working to create a mesh network of modes and a new research group looking at the adaptive nature of transportation and energy infrastructure. All backgrounds are encouraged to participate.